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Anyone care to opine on the correct name for a chord?

Discussion in 'Tab & Music Forum' started by rgbedard, Jul 7, 2018.

  1. rocknrollrich

    rocknrollrich Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    47
    Jan 8, 2016
    philadelphia
    There is no key signature shown.
    The key signature tells us which notes get sharpped or flattened, so that the transcriber doesn't have to write out individual sharps and flats.

    If you are going by the guitar diagram, an F# is played.
    Id call it a Bm11
    Or
    D6add9

    But they would be "inversions" as with either of them, the root is not the bottom note.
     

  2. AxemanVR

    AxemanVR I appreciate, therefore I am... Strat-Talk Supporter

    Feb 8, 2014
    Minnesota USA
    '
    Thats assuming the chord has a root.

    What if the root is missing and that root is G?

    Then the base chord could be G-B-D-F#...

    '
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2018

  3. rocknrollrich

    rocknrollrich Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    47
    Jan 8, 2016
    philadelphia
    I can only "name" the chord by what I see. Obviously no G in there. So I don't think I follow you.
     

  4. heltershelton

    heltershelton ASKED TO LEAVE THE STAGE Strat-Talk Supporter

    Jun 5, 2013
    Not Florida
    what if all the notes were missing?
    what would we call it then.
    why even play?
    you know what.....to hell with guitars and amps and chords and scales.
    the best thing to do is not even play....,then we wont have these problems.:p
     

  5. AxemanVR

    AxemanVR I appreciate, therefore I am... Strat-Talk Supporter

    Feb 8, 2014
    Minnesota USA
    ''
    I wasn't trying to contradict you, but just wanted to interject another way to look at it...

    My point is that chords are, with very few exceptions, always used in a progression with other chords and that is sometimes the only practical way to really determine what a chord like this one is (i.e.: one that can be potentially named several different ways).

    So what is this chord?

    If it's used between two different A type chords (as mentioned earlier) then it's possibly something related to that. Perhaps a passing chord of sorts.

    But, when played alone, it can't be conveniently called this or that without knowing what context it's being used, especially, as you so observantly put it, there's no key to go by.

    So, in that case it could be a chord without a root... or a 3rd... or a 5th... etc...

    Ommisions are a valuable tool to help chords harmonize a progression more smoothly and just because a chord is missing the root, 3rd or 5th doesn't mean it can't perform the same function in that progression, since a person's brain can still "hear" that note even if it's missing - when used in a creative fashion...

    So what is this chord?

    At the very least, it seems to me that five different people just gave five different answers and they can't all be right (or wrong), so who's "more right"?

    I say, let's see the entire progression first before finally declaring exactly what it is once and for all...



    '
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2018
    rocknrollrich likes this.

  6. heltershelton

    heltershelton ASKED TO LEAVE THE STAGE Strat-Talk Supporter

    Jun 5, 2013
    Not Florida

  7. rgbedard

    rgbedard Strat-Talker Strat-Talk Supporter

    137
    Feb 3, 2018
    Santa Cruz, CA
    The absence of a key signature (despite my weak skills) and the Am suggest that it's in Am. There would be no correct addition of a key signature, (but it would have been more helpful if I had correctly sharped the F.) My bad.
     

  8. AxemanVR

    AxemanVR I appreciate, therefore I am... Strat-Talk Supporter

    Feb 8, 2014
    Minnesota USA
    Note: I revised my entire post here after realizing that @rgbedard was describing how a chord was fingered on the fretboard not the actual notes of that chord...

    That last chord is an Am7 chord:

    A - root
    C - m3rd
    E - 5th
    G - m7th

    '
    If we are only allowed to go by your short Am-Xchord-Am7 progression in the key of Am, then it's probably just some sort of altered A passing chord...

    A = root
    C or C# = 3rd (omitted)
    E = 5th
    G = 7th (omitted)
    B = 9th
    D = 11th
    F# = #13th

    I'd say an A11#13th chord in the Key of Am.

    ===================================
    Side Note: The "A11" chord name assumes the 7th and 9th are included - despite having no 7th in this case. Since there is no 3rd either, no Major or minor tonality is indicated, so it's simply left as A11 as well. Then, on top of all that the non-diatonic (not part of the Key of Am) "sharped 13" is added as an altered tone, thus: A11#13.
    ===================================

    On the other hand, if we are building a chord strictly on the notes available from your mystery chord alone (A-B-D-E-F#), then the Key of G (or Em) would seem to make more sense than Am, since G has only one sharp in its key signature (F#).

    The Key of Am (C Major) has no "accidentals" (no sharps or flats) in its key signature, so the F# puts the kibosh on that possibility.

    The Key of D Major does have an F# along with a C# that wasn't part of your mystery chord, so D could be a contender.

    The Key of A also has an F# and a C# along with a G# which is also not included in your mystery chord, so that key is just as likely too - perhaps more so considering the chords in your super short progression example.

    Of course this is all pure speculation since we don't know what the other missing notes are - plus - some of the notes on your mystery chord are presumably alterations anyway.

    But the acid test is how it works with other chords and after messing around I found that your chord seems to mix well with G, D and A...

    So I will stick to what I said earlier: We need to see the entire progression before we can come up with an educated guesstimate on where and how it fits in the known musical universe...


    '
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2018

  9. rgbedard

    rgbedard Strat-Talker Strat-Talk Supporter

    137
    Feb 3, 2018
    Santa Cruz, CA
    Against my better judgement, here is the context. [FYI: this is the very first thing I have recorded in Garage Band, I am completely focused on the mechanics. The guitar playing sucks, the meter is terrible, and the ideas are not fully developed. But you can hear it keeps coming home to A.] You asked for it AxemanVR, lol.

     
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  10. AxemanVR

    AxemanVR I appreciate, therefore I am... Strat-Talk Supporter

    Feb 8, 2014
    Minnesota USA
    '
    That's a pretty catchy little tune @rgbedard - play that funky music white boy!

    It's seems like I'm hearing a G Major chord somewhere in there too, but you're right, it does want to resolve back to Am.

    I like it!

    Now you need to expand on it and take it on a bit of a journey before returning back to the main riff.

    Good Luck!

    '
     
    rgbedard likes this.

  11. rgbedard

    rgbedard Strat-Talker Strat-Talk Supporter

    137
    Feb 3, 2018
    Santa Cruz, CA
    Lol, yeah, it's funky in more ways than one ... but thanks.

    I am a firm believer in music with a sense of humor.
     
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  12. StratPlus97

    StratPlus97 Strat-O-Master

    977
    Apr 7, 2016
    USA
    Or an E9sus w/ A bass
     

  13. StratPlus97

    StratPlus97 Strat-O-Master

    977
    Apr 7, 2016
    USA
    Even if it was a form of C, you wouldn’t need a a C note. It’s not the most important note
     

  14. amstratnut

    amstratnut Peace thru Music. Strat-Talk Supporter

    Dec 1, 2009
    My house.
    I just always go off bass note. I know about inversions but look for easiest explanation first.

    To say the root is not important does not compute. Roots may be omitted but, usually someone hits it somewhere.
     

  15. RegularJim

    RegularJim Strat-Talker

    Age:
    46
    216
    May 8, 2017
    Winthrop Harbor, IL
    rgbedard likes this.

  16. AxemanVR

    AxemanVR I appreciate, therefore I am... Strat-Talk Supporter

    Feb 8, 2014
    Minnesota USA
    '
    Seriously... F#m7b13bb5/A


    '
     
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  17. RegularJim

    RegularJim Strat-Talker

    Age:
    46
    216
    May 8, 2017
    Winthrop Harbor, IL
    I guess complex chords have complex names sometimes, eh? o_O