Warmoth.com Amplified Parts darrenriley.com Mod Kits Lollar Pickups Guitar Pickups Reilander Pickups

Warmoth.com Amplified Parts darrenriley.com Mod Kits Lollar Pickups Guitar Pickups Reilander Pickups

Warmoth.com Amplified Parts darrenriley.com Mod Kits Lollar Pickups Guitar Pickups Reilander Pickups

Join Strat-Talk Today

Can clear nail polish fill a ding on a poly coated neck?

Discussion in 'Tech-Talk' started by Malikon, Oct 4, 2010.

  1. Malikon

    Malikon Dark Cabaret

    Sep 2, 2009
    Chicago
    I dented the back of the neck of my Epi LP this weekend and I was wondering if I could just drip a drop of clear nail polish into it to kind of fill it in?

    I'm not worried about cosmetics, but it's really aggravating to feel that dent when I'm playing.

    Thanks for any advice.
     
  2. ghostwolf

    ghostwolf Super Moderator Staff Member

    Jan 5, 2009
    texas and ohio
    Admin Post
    superglue would work better....
     
  3. AllroyPA

    AllroyPA LeftyStrategist Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    47
    Jun 28, 2009
    Philadelphia Suburbs
  4. Forum Sponsor Sponsored posting

  5. Lua1

    Lua1 PolyMayerMaple Strat-Talk Supporter

    Mar 24, 2010
    Avondale
    i guess youd sand that down then to get it flush? i dont understand how this could possible not be a bigger job than its worth:p
     
  6. Bendub

    Bendub Strat-O-Master

    919
    May 5, 2010
    Ontario
    I tried the nail polish thing when I dropped my dads guitar as a 14yr old. It ended up horrible in appearance but functional. I did a bad job though. If I were to so it now I would do many thin coats whereas I just blobbed it on at the time.
     
  7. ghostwolf

    ghostwolf Super Moderator Staff Member

    Jan 5, 2009
    texas and ohio
    Admin Post
    yes, ma'am, you'd need to sand it level, then polish. not really difficult at all, being so small.
     
  8. anfontan

    anfontan Strat-O-Master

    572
    Oct 13, 2008
    Southern Illinois
    I have a cheap Tele that I dinged the neck on a few years back, it sounds about the same as what you are describing. I used the superglue in several thin coats to build it up. I masked of the area with tape and used very fine grades of sandpaper-then I used steel wool to get it smoothed out and polished.

    I don't even feel it at this point.
     
  9. scotzoid

    scotzoid Senior Stratmaster

    Oct 16, 2009
    Music City
    I'm not gonna argue with with GW over whether superglue is better, but clear nail polish will work fine if you have that & no superglue available. I used clear nail polish to fill a small dent in the '88 I had...you'll need to do some scraping/buffing/polishing to get it back to smooth, but worth the effort if it's annoying you.
     
  10. Malikon

    Malikon Dark Cabaret

    Sep 2, 2009
    Chicago
    scraping buffing and polishing?

    I'm rethinking how annoyed I am by it, it's actually a very small dent.

    It was such a light tap too! The first thing I thought was, "My maple necked Strat would not have dented."

    Stupid mahogany neck!!
     
  11. scotzoid

    scotzoid Senior Stratmaster

    Oct 16, 2009
    Music City
    I jus' brought that up because I know you're not the most...mechanically-inclined member here, I recall you being a little intimidated by the soldering iron ;) But whatever you use to fill the dent will stick out a little, just enough to still annoy you. But keep in mind, we're talking microsurgery here, no power tools needed. I fixed a small Strat dent with a Sharpie, clear nail polish, 600 grit wetordry sandpaper, extra fine scotchbrite-type abrasive pad, & a little dab of Turtle Wax polishing compound. You can do it, w/o the Sharpie, I'm sure of it!

    add: BTW, I've got at least one fingernail sized dent in the maple neck of my '60 P-bass, fortunately it's up towards the headstock were I don't feel it so much.
     
  12. Malikon

    Malikon Dark Cabaret

    Sep 2, 2009
    Chicago
    The funny thing is I AM mechanically inclined. I've built cars, computers, multiple houses, bathrooms, kitchens, etc. I even used to have a carburetor on my coffee table I'd take apart and put together when I got bored. And I built and sold a ton of Freddy Gloves from scratch. Cutting and folding all the copper and brass, carving out the blades on a grinder, doing all the solder and rivet work, etc. They were pretty awesome!

    It's just that when it comes to the guitar I don't like working on it. It's like doing surgery on a friend. :) It's not that I'm scared I'll mess it up, I just really don't like doing it much. Though I admit after replacing everything on my Epi I like it a lot more and I got over my aversion to working on them.

    But still it's always in the back of my mind that I'd rather be playing it then messing around with it.

    The ding on my Epi neck is so small I feel silly complaining about it, but the poly cracked in such a way that there's like a tiny "shelf" that I feel my skin catch on sometimes. Going down the neck it's smooth, but going up the neck every once in awhile you feel your thumb catch on the finish.
     
  13. scotzoid

    scotzoid Senior Stratmaster

    Oct 16, 2009
    Music City
    OK, that being the case, I think if your friend had a boo-boo he couldn't fix himself, he'd appreciate you helping him out in that case.
     
  14. gypsyseven

    gypsyseven Senior Stratmaster

    May 17, 2010
    Southern Germany
    I already did it with clear nail polish...and it looked fine...
     
  15. OldtimeR&R

    OldtimeR&R Strat-O-Master

    758
    Sep 12, 2010
    The Midwest
    Try a little steam heat. Either use a steam iron with a damp cloth over the wood or a soldering iron. Just go slowly at it so as not to burn the wood & make it worse. You'll be surprised how the dent will expand & disappear. If you're hell bent on "filling it" use super glue & put it on in several layers as wa suggested. Seriously though, try the steam, I've removed a lot of large dings that way...
     

Share This Page