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Decking trem - optimal claw tension

Discussion in 'Stratocaster Discussion Forum' started by Fendrix, Feb 12, 2018.

  1. Fendrix

    Fendrix Strat-Talker

    Age:
    38
    165
    Jul 19, 2017
    Manchester
    Hi All,

    I have been experimenting with claw tension settings while decking my trem. From my personal experience and, If I am not wrong, once the bridge has a solid contact with the body the spring vibration is taken out of the equation and the wood resonates more, even though I’m not sure I prefer the tone I’m getting with a tighter claw.

    I’m not going to use the trem arm at all, and my priority is to get as much sustain and acoustic resonance as possible.

    I have 3 springs in III configuration.



    1. Should have my claw as close as possible to the body or right where it makes the bridge contact the body?

    Thanks a lot everyone!
     

  2. Fendrix

    Fendrix Strat-Talker

    Age:
    38
    165
    Jul 19, 2017
    Manchester
    Also...

    Since my tremolo is decked?

    Should I tighten the 6 point vintage trem screws a bit more?
     

  3. Thrup'ny Bit

    Thrup'ny Bit Grand Master Curmudgeon Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    59
    May 21, 2010
    Sheffield, UK
    Where the claw is doesn't matter. When you can't lift the bridge by bending strings then it's done. Don't touch the screws on the bridge, they shouldnt be tight.
     

  4. Fendrix

    Fendrix Strat-Talker

    Age:
    38
    165
    Jul 19, 2017
    Manchester
    Thanks a lot man! :thumb:
     

  5. David Garner

    David Garner Senior Stratmaster

    When I decked mine I just put 5 springs in it and screwed the claw flat to the wood. It worked very well.

    I prefer it floating because you get a bigger bell-like bottom end, but decking it tightens everything up and makes it more Tele-like, which to my ears gives it a more prominent midrange and a somewhat more focused sound.

    I'd love to have 2 Strats, one decked and one floating, but right now I only have the one and I get more of what I love from the Strat by floating it.
     
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  6. Thrup'ny Bit

    Thrup'ny Bit Grand Master Curmudgeon Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    59
    May 21, 2010
    Sheffield, UK
    My ST54 has been decked since the day I got it in January 1996. It has the original three springs and they are tightened as I said above. My CP50s bridge is currently floated. It makes no difference whatsoever to the sound and very little to the feel of the guitar, or which I play, it still sounds like me playing my guitar.
     
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  7. Fendrix

    Fendrix Strat-Talker

    Age:
    38
    165
    Jul 19, 2017
    Manchester
    Yea that was exactly what I experienced. It definitely lost some of the bell-like tones and became tighter and more focused.
     
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  8. IronSchef

    IronSchef Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    55
    May 17, 2012
    Flew Here On My Dragonfly
    If you really want to lock it down, do this:

    [​IMG]
     

  9. Tone Guru

    Tone Guru Senior Stratmaster

    Dec 13, 2011
    Music City TN
    The springs are always going to vibrate somewhat, and get picked up by the bridge pickup.
    Depending on string gauge you might use 4 springs.

    I go one turn past the point where the pitch no longer raises when tightening the claw, with the strings tuned to pitch.

    No.
     
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  10. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    72
    May 26, 2006
    Jacksonville, FL
    these two attributes are diametrically opposed.

    The very qualities that improve sustain, diminish resonance.. conversely, the very things that improve resonance, erode sustain.

    anything done must be weighed against peripheral effects. You cannot just chase one feature/quality and succeed every time... doing one thing reputed as improving something can in actually seriously erode some other quality ya never thought of.

    Proceed with caution...

    Ron Kirn
     
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  11. Fendrix

    Fendrix Strat-Talker

    Age:
    38
    165
    Jul 19, 2017
    Manchester
    Thanks man, I had no idea... I am learning so much from you guys.

    In that case, I guess I would prioritise sustain.
     

  12. strat_strummer

    strat_strummer Senior Stratmaster Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    56
    Dec 17, 2017
    Lost
    That works......
     
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  13. Ebidis

    Ebidis Providing the world with flat bends since 1985 Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    52
    Nov 14, 2013
    Alabama
    That is a basic matter of physics, yet it is astonishing how many guitar players believe that more resonance = more sustain.
     
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  14. Fendrix

    Fendrix Strat-Talker

    Age:
    38
    165
    Jul 19, 2017
    Manchester
    Yea I’ll try and get a maple block and some extra springs to block it this way.
     

  15. Thrup'ny Bit

    Thrup'ny Bit Grand Master Curmudgeon Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    59
    May 21, 2010
    Sheffield, UK
    And also totally miss the fact that the solid bodied guitar was designed to get rid of that nasty resonance of the acoustic...
     
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  16. Thrup'ny Bit

    Thrup'ny Bit Grand Master Curmudgeon Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    59
    May 21, 2010
    Sheffield, UK
    A bit of any old wood the right size will do it, once the block is in there it doesn't matter how many springs are there, they have to be adjusted to clamp the block.
     
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  17. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    72
    May 26, 2006
    Jacksonville, FL
    Ahh . . "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." (George Santayana)

    That was the very genesis of those horrid guitars of the late 70's and through the 80's the Metal Guys sought... wonderful sustain... but when they began playing different styles, and a bit more clean, they noticed the sound was somewhat austere... everything is a compromise...

    rk
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2018
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  18. Fendrix

    Fendrix Strat-Talker

    Age:
    38
    165
    Jul 19, 2017
    Manchester
    I agree, I actually had a Les Paul and a 80s Washburn with lots of sustain and ended up selling them. Currently I only have this strat and I’m ok with the sustain. I just wanted to maximise it within some reasonable limits.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2018

  19. David Garner

    David Garner Senior Stratmaster

    [​IMG]
     
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  20. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    72
    May 26, 2006
    Jacksonville, FL
    what I tell guys is... build the guitar.... don't worry about trying to make things known to be non specific, perform in a specific manner... that's the best way in the world to be disappointed.

    Since it's darn near impossible to make a "bad" guitar these days, assuming you use parts that, at the very least, can be accused of being quality.. an have the where with all to follow up with a proper fret leveling and setup.. and you know how to play... you're gonna be fine... and if you cannot play, it really won't matter much anyway... it'll be technically superior... but as for it's voice, well that's entirely up to you... Hey you Tone freaks .. read that again...:p

    drives me nuts to hear someone that cannot stumble through "stairway" without a half dozen "No, waits" .. goin' on about "tone"... it's kinda like someone goin on about what a great SCUBA diver they are when he can't swim... and is afraid of water... :rolleyes:

    rk
     
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