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Do I really need an instructor?

Discussion in 'Sidewinders Bar & Grille' started by pgjstrat, Mar 23, 2019.

  1. JurnyWannaBe

    JurnyWannaBe Strat-Talker

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    P.S. Just like Sratoman10 said...it’s a WHOLE lot easier to learn something right the first time around. Trying to unlearn something as simple as a G to C to G chord change is a hard thing to do...especially if you’be been doing it a different way for 20 years.
     
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  2. Keith268

    Keith268 Strat-Talker Silver Member

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    A good instructor is an amazing blessing! Just like any responsible leader/teacher, it is important to have a plan and adjust when needed.

    I really liked that my instructor wrote everything he taught me in a notebook.
     
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  3. guitarface

    guitarface Senior Stratmaster

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    Here's the thing- Justin is a better teacher than most teachers you'll actually find locally. Justin has skill as an educator separate and apart from his guitar skill.

    That said, over the course of my career as a noodler for almost 30 years (holy smokes!) I've taken about six in person lessons. Some as a teenager and some as an adult and each one has improved my playing by leaps and bounds.
     
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  4. Wrighty

    Wrighty Senior Stratmaster

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    The guy should teach according to the abilities and needs of each pupil. I’d been playing, mainly three chord stuff, for many years before I started taking lessons. My teacher started by just playing music with me, a lot of me strumming and him playing lead. Couple of lessons in and he’d twigged my leanings towards country stuff. Started showing me some standard country licks and chord pegressions. Lessons now just flow, I’ll ask him about a particular number I’ve been playing, show him, and he’ll chip in with some different approaches. It’s kind of organic. I never wanted to be stuck too much theory stuff but now love it when he explains why certain stuff sound# country, rock or whatever, AND I can come hone and add snippets to other stuff I’m play guitar.
     
  5. duzie

    duzie Senior Stratmaster

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    Maybe Justin’s course isn’t right for you.
    Not an insult my friend, but if you’re starting the intermediate course but don’t know what a diatonic triad is something is wrong.
     
  6. diverse379

    diverse379 Strat-Talker

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    Finding the best teacher for you is like finding a perfect parent
    Almost impossible but when you find one that ticks almost all the boxes
    You have the makings for a stellar child who will grow to maturity with all the things needed

    So my advice is continue with your online program but vigantly seek out teachers

    It may even. Be in another genre

    My best vocal
    Teacher was a classically trained
    Teacher

    You never know but it alwyhelps
    To have someone really looking out for your progress
     
  7. davidKOS

    davidKOS over 48 years playing gigs Strat-Talk Supporter

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    Well, that would depend on what music you are dealing with. Lots of folks manage on their own in basic blues-rock styles but not so much in classical guitar, jazz guitar, playing theater and shows, etc. where solid training under the supervision of good teachers really helps.
     
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  8. ido1957

    ido1957 Senior Stratmaster

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    Teacher - forces you to practice/learn because of guilt or money.
    Online - forces you to have self discipline.

    There is a plethora of free or cheap online and downloadable lessons
    I just bought Matt Schofield's True Fire Blues Speak lesson.
    The interface and content are excellent.
     
  9. Relaxing at Cam

    Relaxing at Cam Strat-Talk Member

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    Don't take lessons just because you think you should take lessons. Some people take lessons for decades. While it's their enjoyment, it's not something I would do or advise.

    In my opinion, lessons should be linked to a goal. If you have a goal, figure out a realistic timeframe and set a number of lessons from the beginning. Once you're there or the deadline passes, stop the lessons. After a breather, you can decide where to go from there.

    If you don't have a goal, it is likely that lessons would be frustrating. If you don't know where you're going, your teacher won't either.

    Some have posted and said that lessons will teach you how to form good habits. The guitar is, in a way, several different instruments, and every technique or lack of a technique is its own style. Just look at the debates on different sizes of picks, whether or not to use a pick, anchoring, etc.

    Most of the time, whether or not a playing habit is good or bad depends on the style you're trying to play in. For example, you'll use a thick pick, high action and play hard for Gypsy jazz. Wes Montgomery had a much lighter touch and played with his thumb. Dick Dale used thin picks to mimic an oud played with a quill.

    My own goals are to improve at sight reading and improvisation. I live around a lot of old studio musicians. If I ever have the time, I would like to take 10 lessons from one of them.
     
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  10. JaxStratGuy

    JaxStratGuy Strat-Talker

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    This is what I like. I don't have any friends that play. I've also had the opportunity to play with other students. I always arrive early and my instructor called me in to join the guy ahead of me who's learning drums. Instructor had his guitar and put me on bass (I play that, too) and we jammed for a little. It was good for both of us.

    I also like that he's taught me some alternate fingerings which were a lot easier than what I was trying to do (or what I see others doing). And he's helped me figure out some easier chord transitions, etc. So for me, a local guy has been worth it. But I also augment it with online resources.
     
  11. 808K

    808K Strat-O-Master

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    Just my opinion.

    You should take responsibility for what you want to learn. Bring your own notebook. Create your own syllabus. Move along at a pace that you are comfortable with.

    During the week think about what you need/want to learn and have the lesson centered around that. For me, I mix some theory along with playing every week. And I add a song and get feedback and advice on my playing.

    Everybody progresses at their own pace and wants to learn different things. It’s not really reasonable to think the instructor can read your mind and always know what is best for you.

    I say this after learning on my own for about 3 years before I started to take lessons. Justin is terrific, but he won’t show you things your instructor will.

    To repeat: take responsibility for your lessons.

    As stated, this is just my opinion based on my experience, so no offense to others who believe otherwise.
     
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  12. 808K

    808K Strat-O-Master

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    This is a good example of the value of onsite instruction vis-à-vis online lessons.
     
  13. dueducs

    dueducs Senior Stratmaster

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    I tend to agree with this, if the student is at an appropriate level, which it sounds as though the OP is.
     
  14. thomquietwolf

    thomquietwolf Most Honored Senior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

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    Maybe it's as simple as
    He's not yours...

    Is he teaching you to play
    Music
    Or
    Songs
     
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  15. henderman

    henderman Most Honored Senior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

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    teaching is a skill in itself and most people can not teach even what they are an expert at.

    when i found the right teacher he taught me more in a short time than everyone else did in decades put together.

    this is why a drill seargent/instructor makes a good example - since they know how to teach they can get you from 0 to 100 FAST. but they know how to teach.

    you can be attracted to every girl in the room but are they the right one for you for a long term grow together?

    same thing with a business partner or a teacher, you need the right one.
     
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  16. Dick Blackmore

    Dick Blackmore Senior Stratmaster

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    Yes. Knowledge does not spring out of the air into your brain. There is nothing more valuable than a good teacher. If you like re-inventing wheels well...all the power to ya. People who say that Jimi and Stevie never took lessons are just ignorant. They both learned from legendary blues artists who taught them how to play the blues. Same for Jimi Page, Ritchie Blackmore, Clapton, Beck you name it. If you want to take forever and be good when your 42 then by all means , learn by yourself. Steve Morse aned Pat Metheny went to college. So did McLaughlin, Di Meola, Corea...
     
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  17. rgbedard

    rgbedard non-compliant Strat-Talk Supporter

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    Location:
    Santa Cruz, CA
    As a "self taught" player that has been playing for 50 years, I decided to start taking lessons last year, to get out of a rut ... wanted to develop some aspects of my playing that I had dropped years ago ... I tried working with two instructors. The first was a local guy that mostly teaches Banjo; I wanted to work on finger picking and theory, and work on my aversion to playing in front of others, so didn't seem like a bad idea. After hearing me play, he said I was a Jazz guy (if so, that means I am even worse than I thought, meaning I have a lot more to learn) ... anyway, liked the guy, and he was giving me good material to work on, but I wasn't really enjoying it. We were working towards my stated goals, and I liked the guy, but I wasn't "feeling it." So, I started working with another instructor, a guy that I have known since the 70's, who is the only guy I know out of a lot of talented musicians to fully support himself doing music. He moved to Germany, so we do lessons over video conference. I get with him 2x a month for 2 hours each session. We cover theory, he gives me charts to work on. He has almost as eclectic a taste in music as I do ... we aren't focused as much on my stated goals, but I am "feeling" this, it's broken me out of my rut. I am getting what I need, and I am getting a lot more passionate about my music projects.

    So, do you "need" lessons? Not in my opinion. But if you find an instructor that you "resonate" with, it can be transformative. I study on my own as well, and work on projects that have nothing to do with my lessons. But my lessons expose me to new stuff, and keep me out of that rut ... I plan on continuing to take lessons as long as I play guitar ...
     
  18. Bob the builder

    Bob the builder Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
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    Cranston, Rhode Island
    I got lucky
    I started lessons after a couple years of trying to learn on my own. I could play the chords, had a fun time with it but I sure as hell wasn't anything near a guitar player.
    My teacher and I clicked from the jump.
    In a little over a year I made more advancement than I think I could have in 10 years on my own.
    I started all this just for me...to sit home on the couch and have a little fun. Kind of a mental therapy.
    Now I'm playing at a couple open jams and actually holding my own.
    Maybe your teacher isn't the right guy for you but there's more than 1 teacher out there too
     
  19. DJGranite

    DJGranite Strat-Talker

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    Maine
    Randy Rhoads found a guitar teacher in every town he played on while on tour to take a lesson from.
    While making a living playing his guitar in front of thousands.
    And don't forgot his profession before being in bands.... guitar teacher.
    Just a thought.
     
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  20. LPBlue

    LPBlue "That Guy", again...dammit! Strat-Talk Supporter

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    It matters little what you know but rather what you do not. I taught myself guitar after violin lessons from my dad when I was very young. In retrospect, I wish I had continued the violin lessons longer for the music theory involved.:whistling:
     
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