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Fender Fullerton 82-84 strats!

Discussion in 'Stratocaster Discussion Forum' started by marcusss79, Feb 17, 2011.

  1. marcusss79

    marcusss79 Strat-Talk Member

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    Please post pics and info of your fullerton reissues.
    Heres som shots of my early '62 with red bobbins and three-way switch!

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  2. marcusss79

    marcusss79 Strat-Talk Member

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  3. Crimson

    Crimson Strat-O-Master

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    That's just drop dead gorgeous!!!
    But I have to say that I think it's ridiculous that the early fullerton RI stratos cost so much.
     
  4. mabley123

    mabley123 Senior Stratmaster

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    nice guitar.
    i also have a 62-fulllerton reissue v002504-red bobbins still has all the stickers ( no case candy though ) on the neck pocket and body.
    i will post some pics later. i bought it from a friend who caught an autoimmune disease and is making him deaf. he cannot hear music anymore and i picked this guitar out for him brand new in july 82. mine has a rarity not seen often as i have seen it only on a couple of others.

    mine has 2 string trees original from the factory. i saw 1 on a 57 the other day. it was a v0005xx serial number. very low number. it had grey bobbins. sunburst

    the thing about the fullerton reissues is they are getting old and collectable. 1 more year and they will be where the 1954 strat was in 84. 30 years old. and the earliest ones ( serial numbers under 4000 ) ones that have differences...like red bobbin pickups, grey bobbin which are even more rare, custom color and custom color with red bobbin pickups are worth more. and there were more 1957 fullerton strats made than the 62's so potentially the 62's with custom color and red-grey bobbin pickups will be more collectable because there were less of them. but the 57 custom color is the reissue ive seen go for the most money. fiesta red- red bobbins 7900 i think it was. there is 1 now with a lower serial number at fenderreissue that is 7100 and it is serial number v000291

    less than 10% of the early fullerton guitars had red-grey bobbin pickups..serial numbers under v004000. there are a few exceptions but are rare. there were only 5-7% with custom color. so add custom color and rare pickups and you get ????

    also take note that there were 4 different instruments making up the v000000 series
    2 stratocasters, jazz bass precision bass and the telecaster

    at that rate if 50% of the instruments being made were stratocasters and they were making between 10-15 instruments a day...average of 12.5 instruments....then only 6.75 stratocasters maximum sometimes less per day were being made in the early days of the fullerton reissues. they hand routed these guitars and used the same equipment that leo used in the 50's and 60's. abbigail ybarra kept her job there and taught them how to wind good pickups. how she scatter wound them and how she guided it into the winder ect... ( same winder leo had too ) this is where the red and grey bobbin pickups come in. (some known to be true some said but i cannot verify ) it is true that only the first guitars made there had these pickups and since abbigail taught them it is pretty safe to say these first pickups were supervised by her personally. there were not many of these guitars made at the plant.
    from opening and closing of the plant they made 16000 v000000 instruments. best way to date is the neck date- pot codes and serial number
    As a broad generality V000001-V004000 denote a 1982 guitar, V004000-V010000 denote a 1983 guitar, and V010000-V016000 denotes a 1984 guitar.
    at that rate they made 2000 stratocasters in 1982, (1000 or more 57's and less than 1000 62 reissues.) 3000 in 83 and 3000 in 84. 9000 in all from fullerton. so not many.
    i just bought a july 82-1957 reissue sunburst body from a guy on ebay. i also bought december 82 fullerton black bobbin pickups from a 57 reissue from him. i already have possession of the pickups and i am waiting on the body now. ive seen these bodies go for 1500-2100 dollars. eddievegas has 1 for 1499 right now. the only thing about the body i got is that it had a different tremolo..floyd rose i believe and it had 2 screw holes that have been professionally repaired and a couple for a different pick gaurd. but that ok so it is not 100%...99% but i got it at what i think is a good price and it is in great shape. it had grey bobbins in it originally.
    im making a partscaster and i will post pics.
    i bought some certified preban kenyan elephant ivory for a nut. i bought the fullerton body, fullerton pickups, i have rs guitarworks pots and super pot. i ordered some european ( sycamore ) maple master flame figure lumber from TALARICO wood suppliers in pennsylvania. he sometimes supplies martin with wood and he only sells lumber but will cut it to your specs. a really nice guy and will talk and answer any questions you have and is very patient but he is very busy.

    i going to have a neck made but i am still debating. i would like 24 frets and truetemperment frets so i would have the neck made at 9.5 radius with no fret slotting or dots and unfinished and they have to approve the neck builder. they usually use warmoth but i do not want to use them. not to mention i will have to save more money for the neck. i want a manmade usa tremolo. he made the best tremols for PRS and when they went cheap they went to a cheaper tremolo also. he supplied them from 85-89 when PRS was considered by many to be the best made guitars. a suhr back plate hum cancelling unit, tuners i have not decided on.

    i had to buy a whole master grade board. it was quarter sawn 84 inches x 2 x 4 of the best master figure of european maple which is what d'angelico used to make guitars as well as stradivarius violins. . he cut it into 27 inch blanks. 4 of them. i also want the neck to have a maple capped neck.
     
  5. marcusss79

    marcusss79 Strat-Talk Member

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    do you have a picture of your 82, mabley123?
     
  6. mabley123

    mabley123 Senior Stratmaster

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    i have a canon film camera and i will get some pics devoleped and post soon. i also have a 4 bolt 71 oly white strat.

    i have a really bad shot i will post and i have some opics of the body i just bought. more will be on the way if i can figure how to post.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2011
  7. mabley123

    mabley123 Senior Stratmaster

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    strat pics

    here are some bad pictures of my 82 sunburst, 71 oly strat and no it is not that white on the bottom left. that is the sun. and the 57 reissue body i just bought and i am waiting on. it is july 82.
    i will post better pics soon. i have some really nice european maple i am going to have a neck made from for the 57 and i will post pics of the lumber i bought along with a few other things.
    also that is not the original bridge on the 57 reissue
     

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  8. marcusss79

    marcusss79 Strat-Talk Member

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    looks cool!
     
  9. marcusss79

    marcusss79 Strat-Talk Member

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    more pics please!
     
  10. klunkerbill

    klunkerbill Strat-Talk Member

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    Here's a couple of my '82/'57 and my old '82/'52. The stickers match on the body and plate of the '57. No red bobbins, black. Doubt they're stock. Cloth wires. Different tuners at one time. One pot changed. Sold the '52 for cheap. :( but still have the '57. :)

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    http://i246.photobucket.com/albums/gg85/klunkerbill/DSCN2584.jpg
     
  11. 56Pboy

    56Pboy Strat-O-Master

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    Good point. However the Fullerton reissues are most likely collectible from the fact that CBS was doing some changes at it's factory, the very one that wasn't included in the deal when CBS sold Fender off, and production across the board for all of their instruments was stifled. Hence, there are a very limited number of the Fullerton reissue instruments around.

    Another point is that while they weren't perfect reproductions, they were the first attempt by Fender to offer something a little closer to vintage specs and quality. The initial interest in them led to to the new owners of Fender, after the CBS debacle, being willing to pursue the much more accurate and high quality reissues we have available today.

    Most of them are good guitars given their time and place in Fender history, just like Gibson's Heritage and Kalamazoo Les Paul models were early and imperfect attempts at getting back to 59 specs, yet some of these models have some collector interest among Les Paul geeks. The Fullertons aren't perfect vintage clones, but I'm glad that they came to be for their brief moment in Fender history.
     
  12. fenson

    fenson ----------------------

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    + 1 IMO also
     
  13. fenson

    fenson ----------------------

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    I had thought CBS had sold most of the old jigs and what not to Japan before the reissues can about? Maybe I am wrong but I seem to remember thats why they had a hard time making them and the Japanese where a better representation?
    Why would someone pay 1400 $ for a body alone when they can buy a slightly used complet AVRI which is a better guitar for less. ?
    I can't see paying more for a failed product rather than a newer improved version. But hey whatever.
     
  14. mabley123

    mabley123 Senior Stratmaster

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    to each their own but from owning one and reading many, many reviews on them -i would not trade mine nor have i played a better avri than this 82 reissue. i would not take 2 new ones for the one i have. but thats me.

    i like mine so much i bought 2 more sets of matched -( 2 complete sets from 2- 1982 guitars ) 82 reissue black bobbins for 2 more guitars.
    i got a july 82-57 reissue body that had several screw holes in it for 800 and it is in great shape. not hardy even any checking at all. a few dings but under the bed condition except for 2 tremolo holes and 3 pick guard holes.

    i bought the body and both sets of pickups off of a guy on ebay. i though it a good deal as i saw one go for a high bid of over 2200 with neck plate and screws. recently

    im not saying its worth it- im not saying it isnt, im just saying that what it went for from bidding and there is 1 there now for 1450 - i but it is 30 years old wood and in good condition. the same guy sold one for 2000 and has another one for sale with neck plate and screws for 2500. its at eddievegas store. he is expensive but he turns alot of stuff and he never misrepresents his stuff. it is what he says it it. of course he is also a salesman but he also has ALOT of nice stuff.

    . a 1996 john cunetto body goes for at least 1800-2200 and more and a fender custom shop body goes for 1200 or more. why would i get one of those relics when i can get a great real deal 30 years old fullerton body with real relicing for the same money ?????

    a john cruz nocaster body goes for body goes for 1300 dollars minimum.

    the body contours on these early reissues ( fullerton contour they called it ) were slightly different and are highly desireable and comfortable. very few were made on daily basis and much attention was paid to them.

    the pickups were dipped in wax then, unlike todays guitars. only 82-84. i dont call that a failure.
    also i have never seen a post fullerton reissue that has the truss rod screw placement in the correct place for 59- pre-transition mid - 62. era correct. they went to veneer in mid late 62.

    the new avri reissue 62 also advertises as having a veneer fingerboard. while this also is era correct because 62 was transition year the fullerton guitars and early corona guitars have a slab board..
    the new reissues have truss rod screw orientation the same as late 62 veneer but i have seen a few that came up into the fingerboard but not to era correct and is not typical. also early japanese reissues had the logo underneath the finish which is not correct-and not being picky...but the early jv are great also. many of them had USA supplied red bobbin pickups. i have a friend that has 2 of them. im going to buy an 84 tokai st 80 from a him for cheap.

    i think alot of these guitars fron this era are going to be collectable. they all are great and they all are different and i take nothing from any of them. id like to have 1 of each.

    if i was going to get a les paul type guitar and pay big bucks 4000 + i would not hesitate to get one of those early high end tokai's. they are better than anything gibson makes or has made in a long time


    fender has also been known to sometimes let less than dry wood go through their hands as does some of the liscensed fender neck makers. ive seen several instances where necks became unplayable as they dried. i think 29 year old wood is dry by now. i do not think 29 year old wood is going to move now.

    you pay for what you get.


    these bodies were more like custom shop bodies in reality. few were made ( only 12 -15 guitars a day- spread out over 5 different instruments )
    they actually only made between 4-7 stratocasters a day ( and that being spread out over 2 different models 57-62 and the 57 being produced in higher numbers. the rest being 2 basses and a tele so i think quality control was very high. and it is said that the people that made the early reissues were the foundation for the starting of the custom shop- in 92 i think it was. i could look it up.

    even i remember MR KLEIN THE PICKUP WINDER whom many including myself hold in high esteem- stated -if you have 1 of these early reissues to consider yourself lucky. i believe he thinks them to be nice guitars and nice sounding guitars. so his endorsement is good for me.

    also if they were so much of a failure why is dave gilmore using a 1983 -1957 fullerton reissue strat neck on his main guitar ?? that is another great emdorsement as all of the copies of his main guitar have copies of his 83-57 fullerton reissue neck ?????

    also gilmore used an 83-57 strat on 1 of his tours and got the neck off of it and uses it on his early 70's body. now it is 1 of fenders most copied necks.

    i cant really find any fault with my guitar. it stays in tune. i can bend high e 3 frets without fret out. tremolo works great. maybe not a floyd rose or kahler but its not supposed to be.
    it sounds great. all my friends even comment on how clear it is.

    2 things non vintage about all of them ( not including 62 reissue ) is that the strings on the reissues go deeper into the tremolo block. not so on era correct. they came out with the new blocks along time ago to accomodate bullet strings.
    also 1957 strat does not have a ceramic cap. oil and paper if we are really being picky.
    so trem block and no oil in paper cap.

    Fender employees Dan Smith and John Page flew all over the country and looked at every vintage Strat®, eventually deciding that the 1957 model, as well as the 1962 model with rosewood fingerboard, were the quintessential Strats. Recreated using measurements taken from over 200 Stratocasters

    i find the fullerton strat the most comfortable to play and i also have an older 1 owner -me - 40+ years old 4 bolt strat.

    Contours
    The early AVRI strat bodies produced at the Fullerton, CA plant (1982-1984) had many characteristic features from the later strat bodies produced at the Corona, CA plant (1985-present). Namely, the rear cutout on Fullerton era strats were deeper, longer, and had a more subtle transition into the rest of the body. This created a top edge of the body that was sleek and thin compared to the more squared top edge of later reissue strats. These sleek "Fullerton contours" were also found on the very first reissue strats to come out of the Corona plant. It is thought that the very first Corona factory reissue strats actually used bodies that were left over from the Fullerton factory and thus constructed on the old dies and machines as the earlier Fullerton reissues. From my experience, serial numbers in the low V020000's typically have these "Fullerton contours." It was not until serial numbers in the mid to high V020000's (early/mid 1987) that the contours changed on Corona factory produced guitars. These later reissues had an asymmetric rear cutout that had a sharper transition into the rest of the body. Along with this, the top edge of the body was left more square.

    Fender employees Dan Smith and John Page flew all over the country and looked at every vintage Strat®, eventually deciding that the 1957 model, as well as the 1962 model with rosewood fingerboard, were the quintessential Strats. Recreated using measurements taken from over 200 Stratocasters.

    the fullerton strats were the compilation of over 2oo strats measurments and they came out with an average, and we all know they did vary a quite bit. so these guitars are the sum of an average and that is why at first they had tooling problems and had to route them by hand.
     
  15. fenson

    fenson ----------------------

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    Ya and after all that they almost cried when they saw how much better the Japanese JV model where.


    I have played them I have owned an 86 which I think was made from left Fullerton parts. I have read and post links to the fender reissue site .
    I have Black bobin PE wire MIA pups in my 83 JV . they are OK not as good as the 57/62 IMO

    IMO the current AVRI are the best ever.

    They wax pot the pickups these days have been for decades!!


    you could have just poted this link

    http://www.fenderreissue.com/

    sorry I don't buy into they are worth anything! Or that they are better.
     
  16. Rockape

    Rockape Most Honored Senior Member

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    I would love to own a very early AVRI, just to own a piece of history from the era.

    I am facinated by them all (the whole 1982 / 83 era...MIA 'V0xxxxx and MIJ 'JV').

    The way red bobbins are the most highly revered by JV enthusiasts, and in the same way greys revered are by AVRI enthusiasts.....just a rarity issue really; standard Reds and grey X-1's are rarest in JV's and standard greys are rarest in AVRI's.

    I am also facinated by the way some Japanese catalogue advertising of the period (JV) clearly shows USA models (close 12th fret dots and shallow forearm contours.....and the slightly odd (to me anyway) headstock shape), and how the 1982 USA catalogue shows some guitars with Japanese necks (and a later USA Fender catalogue from the early / mid nineties clearly shows Japanese guitars under its AVri banner....the 12th fret dots are pre-CBS period correct).

    Certainly as far as the advertising of the period goes, there were some real strange things going on.

    Yes, facinating stuff!
     
  17. mabley123

    mabley123 Senior Stratmaster

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    Llike i said.

    to each his own.

    the neck is good enough for gilmore. to bad they are not good enough and a failure. also most of the original vintage pickups were not wax potted. my 71 strat has no wax potting as most vintage guitars are not wax potted..except gibson was...and a few fenders every now and then it was not common from what i read.

    the early corona guitars did not have wax potted pickups and few if any 86 guitars were not made from left over fullerton parts. corona opened the last months of 85 and they say only the first ones had fullerton parts. does 86 have fullerton parts ??? unknown to me but if only the first ones had the leftover parts i would say few if any fullerton parts were left for 86. probably a few but mainly 85 reissues were fullerton parts. they may wax pot them now but the first coronas did not...even the ones made from fullerton parts were not wax potted. i also have a set of 86 coronas and there is no wax.0000000000000000000

    the guy ( my neighbor ) im going to buy a tokai st 80 ( i want his 1978 tokai 59 les paul ) from has 3 early jv and ive played them a million times over the years. . they are nice and i take nothing from them i would love to have 1..... but i do like the contour of the fullerton guitars better. he has 8 tokai , 4 fernandez, 5 burny. all late 70's early 80's. st 80 is 1984 model.

    he has an rs guitarworks tele of which fender custom shop wanted 7800 dollars to build it to his specs....rs charged 2800. used 30 years old certified swamp ash. he has every type of high end tokai you can get. both stratocaster and les paul. plus many other guitars and acoustic guitars. larivee, collings.

    needless to say he had a good job at the rail road and was not married. his wife died in the 60's and he collects guitars. hes 75 years old.
    also has a brand new corvette

    also i would still rather have a fullerton body or neck for what i would pay for a relic or custom shop neck or body. any day. why buy a fake? i would also buy a jv body before i would buy a fender custom shop or relic...if i were trying to make a high end partscaster. any day would i rather have the early jv.

    the jv has some things that are more era correct than the fullerton but the fullerton also has things that are more era correct than the jv. mainly visual. they have different neck profiles.

    my fullerton strat body only weighs 3.2 pounds
    and had a thin nitro finish. very thin.
    im not trying to convince anyone of anything. it is just my opinion.

    i just know i love my 82 fullerton strat and i also love my 71 4 bolt oly white strat...but i like the fullerton stratocaster better...neck and all.

    also a doctor here in ashland offered me 5000 for mine. he is also a guitar collector and a doctor of internal medicine in my town. has over 2 million dollars worth of guitars and has a pre production signed P R S guitar. he liked my guitar.

    ive actually seen very very few minority comments putting these guitars down...and ive looked. before i bought it from my friend ( i picked it out new in 82) i reserched it for 2 weeks before i comitted to buy it.

    i am also sorry that i am not going to buy into the theory that they are not nice guitars. ( minority opinion ) the good reviews far outweigh the very very very bad ones i have seen people give.
    thats why people love them and collect them. you dont see many people collecting late 70's stratocasters and the general consensus is ( whether you agree or not ) is that they are some of the best guitars to come from fender since 65. not my opinion but general consensus and they remain highly collectable and are going up all the time.

    i also feel in time the early jv's will be highly collectable...they really are very collectable and of #1 quality and will also only go up in value. same with burny, tokai and some other japanese guitars.
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2011
  18. 56Pboy

    56Pboy Strat-O-Master

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    I'd read an article about the Fullerton reissues in Vintage Guitar Magazine, and in it they said the marketing boy's were in such a damn hurry to start promoting the new vintage reissue line, that they photo-worked a photo of a Tokai Strat, overlaying a Fender logo through clever, old shool analog camera day methods, while letting the Tokia logo stamped on the tuners get past them, and this happened on work done to promote the promised to be, U.S made reissues! Strange stuff indeed.

    The other articles that I have read about the Fullerton reissues do say the folks in charge of the project did measure a lot of specs after having bought some vintage Fender instruments to study, and they settled on certain specs that they thought would best represent their efforts for a reissue line. They were also stifled by upper management as far as being able to tool up for getting the vintage correct fret marker placement issue done right, let alone even thinking of trying to duplicate the vintage clay markers which was made of recyled asbestos floor tile, thanks to Leo being the tightwad he was in many respects. That wasn't gonna happen back then.

    To all of you Fullerton reissue owners, be proud of your instruments as most of them are pretty damn nice guitars. They have a place in Fender history that is considered a good point during the darker CBS days by most Fender fans in spite of the imperfections that make them quite unique.
     
  19. mabley123

    mabley123 Senior Stratmaster

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    i will say my side fret markers are dead on 50/50 on the neck and fretboard and the truss rod adjustng screw is also in the correct place.

    unlike the new reissues i hve seen.
     
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