Amplified Parts Lollar Pickups

Amplified Parts Lollar Pickups Guitar Pickups

Amplified Parts Lollar Pickups Guitar Pickups

Join Strat-Talk Today

Iconic tube strat

Discussion in 'Stratocaster Discussion Forum' started by Rotheryrules, Dec 1, 2015.

  1. colindt

    colindt New Member!

    2
    Feb 13, 2016
    london
    The one I saw it seemed to be printed on the scratch plate
     

  2. stratman323

    stratman323 Dr. Stratster Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    58
    Apr 21, 2010
    London, UK
    They are in stock already. It was like wading through treacle to get any kind of info about them, but I eventually received this from Fender, in answer to my questions. The museum didn't even seem to understand my questions, let alone be able to answer them!

    Thanks for getting in touch and I'm sorry to hear the information you need was not readily available. These guitars are the result of a collaboration between TfL and Fender and, while we may work on future projects together, there will only be 50 instruments made with this particular design.

    There is no numbering system or authentication certificate. They are indeed the same specification as the Fender Standard Stratocaster. The higher price is a reflection of the graphic application, which is under-lacquer on the body and scratchplate and is an expensive process (it won't peel off!).

    I obviously like to think these guitars will appeal to collectors but of course that is ultimately up to our customers to decide!

    Please feel free to contact me should you have any further questions.


    Best regards

    Nick Sharples

    Fender GBI Marketing Manager


    So, no numbering system or authentication certificate means that it will be hard to prove, in years to come, that these were a limited run. So that seems like an error to me as it dents the "collectability" aspect. If you're targeting them at "collectors", why not provide certificates to confirm that a guitar is "number 5 of 50", or something like that? That's what Fender do with other limited run special models.

    A Mexican Standard would cost me £440 new. These are £600. In order for one of these to hold it's value, never mind appreciate in value, I assume that the guitar would need to be mint. So playing it probably wouldn't be a good idea!

    My initial enthusiasm has receded the more I have found out. I really don't think the London Transport Museum has handled this very well - they don't seem to understand the guitar collector's market.
     

  3. balston11

    balston11 Senior Stratmaster Strat-Talk Supporter

    May 8, 2013
    Preston UK
    No reason why they should but Fender should.
     

  4. Duotone

    Duotone Senior Stratmaster

    Feb 12, 2016
    Norway
    Why don't they do one with a chord chart?
     

  5. stratman323

    stratman323 Dr. Stratster Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    58
    Apr 21, 2010
    London, UK
    Because London Underground don't make a chord chart?
     

  6. Gmountain

    Gmountain Strat-Talk Member

    62
    Apr 26, 2015
    Florida
    I know this is an old zombie thread, but I think this is one cool guitar. Brings back a lot of memories for me, plus, I am tired of the plain old strats out there. This is something different.

    LTM has only 5 left, if you are interested, and no more coming.
     

  7. stratman323

    stratman323 Dr. Stratster Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    58
    Apr 21, 2010
    London, UK
    They still have 10% of the original stock left after three years? Boy, they didn't sell well! For me the conclusion is that people don't like them - well certainly not enough to pay £600 for a Mexican Standard - that's a lot of money for a very basic guitar.

    There is one guy who bought one & has already tried to sell it on eBay a few times at a significant mark-up - around £1200 I think. It didn't sell. If they are going to appreciate in value, it looks like it will be in decades, not years.

    I blame Fender for this - to make this work they should have given them special serial numbers (say LT1 to LT50), indicate "1 of 50" on them (like they do on other limited edition guitars) & issue a numbered certificate of authenticity. It might have been a good idea to choose a more prestigious guitar, such as an American Standard. Those might have been the ingredients necessary to make them genuine "collectible". But they did a half-arsed job, they didn't sell, & they probably won't appreciate in value.

    Shame - it is an attractive design.
     

  8. Gmountain

    Gmountain Strat-Talk Member

    62
    Apr 26, 2015
    Florida
    They made 150 of them. I just thonk it looks pretty cool. I'm tired of seeing the same old colors on guitars.

    To each his own though. I love the Martin D-420 too, and I like clorful guns.

    I really don't think there is anything now that would be considered a collectible strat. Who would collect them? The older baby boomers are not buying things to collect. There are millions of guitars in circulation.

    I think you have to buy things simply because it puts a smile on your face.
     

  9. stratman323

    stratman323 Dr. Stratster Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    58
    Apr 21, 2010
    London, UK
    That's a fair point, I suppose. Unfortunately a Mexican Standard Strat wouldn't do that. I'd rather have a Squier Classic Vibe!