Amplified Parts Lollar Pickups

Amplified Parts Lollar Pickups

Amplified Parts Lollar Pickups Guitar Pickups

If You Build It, You Will Save

Discussion in 'Sidewinders Bar & Grille' started by Twin Stripes, Nov 6, 2018.

  1. albala

    albala Most Honored Senior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

    May 10, 2012
    stamford, CT
    I started buying MIA Fender parts and assembling my own guitars in the mid-90s

    All of the non-Gibsons in this pic except the pewter Plus and Contemporary were purchased piece by piece and assembled by me...my wizard does the setups and he obsesses over frets.

    [​IMG]
     
    BuffaloHound and Nate D like this.
  2. Achyskic

    Achyskic Senior Stratmaster

    Feb 19, 2013
    Ohio
    Plek isn’t what it’s cracked up to be. I hand leveled my allparts neck on my new tele build and it’s better than my new Gibson LP Traditional.
     
    Nate D likes this.
  3. artgtr

    artgtr Senior Stratmaster

    Aug 18, 2013
    WURTSBORO, NY
    I guess the answer to your question would be to put a real Fender CS Clapton Strat in an A/B with your Clapton partscaster, & that would be a real world comparison. If anyone has done one, post your thoughts.
     
  4. Mr Dunlop

    Mr Dunlop Senior Stratmaster

    Nov 30, 2014
    usa
    I currently own 7 Gibsons that had the Plek. I have had many more pass through my hands and have had no issues.

    I love low action also.
    A couple I had to lower the nut slot but none of them needed a fret level.
     
  5. Dare1

    Dare1 Senior Stratmaster

    Feb 16, 2011
    Idaho
    Thanks Tony, I appreciate it!
     
  6. AlexJCRandall

    AlexJCRandall Senior Stratmaster

    Sep 11, 2012
    Melbourne
    That would be ignoring both what Ronkirn said barely a few posts above you, and assuming Plek is the same wherever you go.
     
  7. Andrew Wasson

    Andrew Wasson Strat-Talk Member

    Age:
    54
    80
    Nov 6, 2018
    Vancouver, Canada
    You probably already know most of this from being around guitars but...

    I think it comes down to how competent you are with putting together a guitar and your attention to detail. It’s definitely not rocket science but you have to have patience and you have to have that “knack” and understanding of how parts a, b & c affect the rest of the parts they relate to. Some people have it, others don’t.

    Above all, IMO, you need to have experience in doing the setup. It’s been my experience that you can’t read up on that or absorb it through YouTube videos... it helps but you have to actually do setups and get it under your skin.

    I attempted a few builds over my head when I was younger, impatient and... well mostly impatient. Eventually I sat down, decided what I wanted and put a plan together to build it. Then I spent a bunch of time doing the setup, leveling and polishing and noting how something simple like overtorquing the neck joint can throw out you’re setup. Simple things but if you’re like me, you need to learn them by experience.

    On a related note, I loaned out my T-Type homebuild a while back to a friend who was going through a rough patch and now she wants to buy it from me. It’s a Canadian Pine body I finished in a light blonde opaque wash with a Canadian maple with rosewood generic neck (modern C, 22 med jumbo frets), outfitted with Twisted Tele neck pickup, Tonerider Vintage Plus bridge pickup, TBX tone control, 4-way switching, ashtray 3 saddle bridge, locking tuners. It’s a very straight forward guitar that cost me about $600 Canadian in parts but it plays way above it’s weight. I’m not going to sell it but I’m going to suggest we put together a plan and she can build one like it for herself. I’ll assist with the setup and assembly, wiring, etc... but I can’t think think of a better way to bond with a guitar than by building it yourself.
     
    The Strat Dude likes this.
  8. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    72
    May 26, 2006
    Jacksonville, FL
    Certainly a comment that could elicit a "discussion" but considering the dynamic nature of a neck... it would not matter to what degree precision the frets are leveled.... as soon as its removed from the machine, or workbench, the frets begin cooling. If they are cooling, it means they were warm.. that heat is transmitted into the wood, causing it to expand.. as it cools the wood contracts... that's just elementary physics... and elementary or not, the applied science could care less what we think about it.. it WILL do what Newtonian laws dictate, so . .

    it does not matter if you had one Pleked or if it was done be a good tech... for all practical purposes the end results are the same..

    Where the plek does transcend the tech is if you want something out of the ordinary done... like a compound radius cut on a straight radius board... and if the weren't so damn expensive, i'd have one.. but I'd have to do a boat load of necks to make up 100,000.00 ..

    rk
     
    Neil.C and Nate D like this.
  9. knh555

    knh555 Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    46
    Dec 6, 2016
    Massachusetts
    Or another way to compare is “exactly what you want” vs what the factory provides. The more specific your requirements and the bigger that gap, the more cost effective the partscaster becomes. It’s not just about the level of parts.
     
    Tone Deaf likes this.
  10. leduke

    leduke New Member!

    Age:
    37
    3
    Nov 5, 2018
    FR
    Hello.

    I'm wondering... Whay not a Partcaster ? have you any feedback with your partcasters ?
    How to chose the body, the neck etc...

    thank you.
     
  11. artgtr

    artgtr Senior Stratmaster

    Aug 18, 2013
    WURTSBORO, NY
    I have a parts Telecaster - every part was the best I could get & I also wanted everything blacked out on this Tele. It’s a great guitar. Ended up a little heavier than I had hoped for, but plays great. Not so good after 3 full sets at a gig, with sore shoulder!
    Resale value - that’s the killer, I have about $1375. In the guitar, including case. IMG_1704.JPG IMG_0327.JPG
    I would have to break it up into parts to even come close to getting some of my money back, I knew this before I had it built. Yea, I had a friend (luthier) assemble & finish it, much better at this, than me.
    I thought I had the skills & time, he is the reason it turned out as nice as it is, & charged me $300. For it.
     
  12. jaybones

    jaybones Most Honored Senior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

    Ah, generally feedback is something to be avoided. ;)

    But I generally try to find the best top quality parts. I mean part of rolling your own is getting to totally customize what you want.

    Otherwise just buy off the rack.

    And you wouldn't order a custom shop with Squier level components.
     
    StillAlive&Well likes this.
  13. Believer7713

    Believer7713 Senior Stratmaster Silver Member

    Age:
    44
    Dec 27, 2016
    US
    Nnnnoooooo! You must embrace the feedback...it can be a great effect.

    I've built several partscasters with great results. Most of mine are built from either Squier parts or lower end parts that most would consider just over kindling. Learn to do the work and pay attention to the details...you can make a good guitar from less than stellar parts.

    I figure if I'll "never" get my return from the finished products then I'll just build it for myself. I don't have a guitar that I've sunk more than $400 into and I don't have one that isn't at least a really good player, if not a great one. The skills I've learned from doing the work now gets me paid working on and repairing guitars for other people.
     
    Tone Deaf likes this.
  14. Neil.C

    Neil.C Most Honored Senior Member

    Mar 3, 2012
    Surrey, England
    With the huge range of models that Fender make nowadays I'd be surprised if there wasn't something for everyone to be honest.
     
    Stratbats likes this.
  15. Achyskic

    Achyskic Senior Stratmaster

    Feb 19, 2013
    Ohio
    Not ignoring what he said, just the opposite. It was confirming what he said.
     
  16. Swampash

    Swampash Senior Stratmaster

    Jun 13, 2012
    Here
    The funny bit is that the $40 Timex is more accurate than the $10K Rolex. But your point is a good one. The Timex is a tool whereas the Rolex is jewellery.
     
    Stratbats likes this.
  17. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    72
    May 26, 2006
    Jacksonville, FL
    that sums it up perfectly... as, some guitars are tools, and some are "wall art." either can perform superbly..

    r
     
    Swampash likes this.
  18. knh555

    knh555 Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    46
    Dec 6, 2016
    Massachusetts
    Not if you want to build this. Fender doesn't have anything like it, with the tapped single coils with oversize poles on the pickups, three-way mini-switches to get both cool and hot pickup outputs, and a full brass bridge and saddles (this one is chromed brass). The pickups and switching give me sounds I can't easily get elsewhere on a strat while also giving me traditional strat tones. In other words, partscasters can make sense, depending on what you're looking for.

     
  19. knh555

    knh555 Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    46
    Dec 6, 2016
    Massachusetts
  20. Andrew Wasson

    Andrew Wasson Strat-Talk Member

    Age:
    54
    80
    Nov 6, 2018
    Vancouver, Canada
    I’m just going to veer off the subject of guitars for a moment.

    Thats not an accurate statement. I’m not a clock or watch guy but in the last 50 odd years I’ve received a couple of Timex watches, a couple of Seiko’s and for my 50th birthday, a 1968 Rolex Date Just Perpetual. I took it into a watch guy and had it set up. Initially it ran a couple of minutes slow so I took it back and had it adjusted. Now the Rolex is as accurate as my iPhone, month to month. Think about it. It’s 50 years old and stone cold accurate. It’s perpetual too so as long as I wear it every day, it doesn’t need winding.

    Anyway, I thought I’d add some context to the watch part of the discussion.