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Installing a Floyd on a Super Strat. Do I REALLY need the locking nut?

Discussion in 'Stratocaster Discussion Forum' started by BluesGuitarist, Sep 12, 2017.

  1. BluesGuitarist

    BluesGuitarist Strat-Talker

    340
    Jun 18, 2012
    Louisiana
    Hey guys. I'm doing a super strat partscaster and I got a body on the cheap yesterday. It seems to be routed for a Floyd Rose so I went ahead and ordered a cheap knockoff just to see how well this thing turns out.

    Now I have a really nice '94 MIM neck that I plan to use as well, but I don't want to butcher it to fit the locking nut. I am by no means a shredder or metal player, so I won't ever be abusing the tremolo. Just your occasional blues/classic rock stuff.

    So that leads me to my question. Is it possible to leave the regular 'ol nut on my MIM neck and not have any major issues?
     

  2. Ebidis

    Ebidis Most Honored Senior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    50
    Nov 14, 2013
    Alabama
    I wouldn't think you would have any more issues than you would with a stock Strat trem.
     

  3. Believer7713

    Believer7713 Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    43
    Dec 27, 2016
    US

  4. Rigel42

    Rigel42 Strat-Talker

    289
    Feb 20, 2009
    Austin, TX
    Why not give it a shot? Who knows it may work, and it would be nice to tune the guitar without a Allen wrench :thumb:
     

  5. davidKOS

    davidKOS Retired Performer Strat-Talk Supporter

    May 28, 2012
    California
    Well, what's the point of a Floyd rose if you do not have the lock nut and the ability to do anything and still be in tune?

    You might as well have any other vibrato system then.
     

  6. ashtray

    ashtray Strat-O-Master

    Age:
    46
    852
    Mar 15, 2017
    LA
    If you use the trem, the strings will slide through the nut and might not return all the way back - destroying your tuning every time you use the bar. This happens to an extent with a normal trem but the Floyd design allows you much bigger trem dives with small movements of the bar - so even using a Floyd "just a bit" is like going really heavy on a regular trem.

    The good news is you can easily block the trem and use it with great tuning stability.

    The only other issue you might/will have is that Floyd bridges are usually preset to a certain large radius, while normal Strat necks tend to have a smaller (more curved) radius. This mismatch will cause your strings to choke out - especially your G and D strings.
     
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  7. diogoguitar

    diogoguitar Strat-O-Master

    834
    Feb 2, 2012
    Northwest US
    get the locking nut. It will make your life much easier.
     
    davidKOS likes this.

  8. Believer7713

    Believer7713 Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    43
    Dec 27, 2016
    US
    The Kahler string lock uses the existing nut and mounts right behind it leaving minimal movement through the nut slots. They have been used did a few decades now with great results and mine works with nip problems too.
     

  9. alainvey

    alainvey Senior Stratmaster

    Jan 31, 2015
    London, UK
    Guthrie Govan uses them this way. He uses old floyds without fine tuners for some reason I have forgotten. No fine tuners makes having a locking nut impractical, but GG still seems to think the bridge alone is worth using over anything else.
     
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  10. davidKOS

    davidKOS Retired Performer Strat-Talk Supporter

    May 28, 2012
    California
    I still don't see the point - the whole reason for a Floyd IS the locking bits!

    GG is a great player, though.
     
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  11. TheDuck

    TheDuck Senior Stratmaster

    Jan 12, 2016
    Lil' Rhody
    That was the first step towards more headaches than you ever bargained for.
    The lower end and knock off FRs are not good at all. The metals they are made from are very poor quality, the threads strip, bridge saddles crack and wear prematurely and even if installed properly, are poor in performance.

    The FRs are designed for a large radius (flat) fret board. There are replacement bridge saddles you can install for the OFR that can compensate for a Strats rounder (lower radius) neck, though I dont know if they fit anything but an OFR.
    FWIW, Ive never played a FR equipped Strat that felt right.

    Also, they different models of FR are made to different specs. One size doesn't fit all, and a non-original FR wont fit into an OFR route.

    That was the first run of FRs. EVH used them as well. They were better than a stock bridge because of their density, two point mounting and locking mechanism. First run and OFRs have locks at the nut and each bridge saddle.
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2017
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  12. alainvey

    alainvey Senior Stratmaster

    Jan 31, 2015
    London, UK
    I forget, to be honest, but he started using these old-style floyds (which they now actually sell again) after using the Gotoh 2-points that Suhr guitars use, so it's clear that he prefers them.

    I'm not sure what your experience with Floyds and more conservative 2-point designs is, but in my own experience floyds feel very unique, and have much greater range than the kind of 2-point on a modern-style strat.

    It's also possible he prefers the wider spacing that Floyds have.

    GG seems to put a great deal of thought into everything he does, and his attention to detail is astonishing, so there must be a good reason for it!

    One final thought is that the bridge is still locking, and GG uses locking tuners - with a correctly cut nut there's not much to separate it from a double-locking Floyd in practice.
     
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  13. alainvey

    alainvey Senior Stratmaster

    Jan 31, 2015
    London, UK
    Here you go:

     
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  14. AngelDeVille

    AngelDeVille Strat-Talk Member

    Age:
    106
    96
    Jul 25, 2017
    ABQ
    The locking nut is the only thing I hate about a Floyd.

    One of these days I'm going to assemble a guitar with a Floyd and no locking nut.
     

  15. TheDuck

    TheDuck Senior Stratmaster

    Jan 12, 2016
    Lil' Rhody
    Your opinion is shared by many.
    I dont know why so many players hate the locking nut.
    If the guitar is set up properly, and you restring properly, there's no issue with them.

    That said, if someone doesnt understand the little complexities needed to get them to behave, I can see them being a real headache.
    But really, they arent complicated.
     
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  16. AngelDeVille

    AngelDeVille Strat-Talk Member

    Age:
    106
    96
    Jul 25, 2017
    ABQ
    If you string a guitar properly they have no value.
     

  17. albala

    albala Most Honored Senior Member

    May 10, 2012
    stamford, CT
    I took off the horrid locking nut, changed to an LSR roller nut, and added locking tuners.

    Works wonderfully.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  18. TheDuck

    TheDuck Senior Stratmaster

    Jan 12, 2016
    Lil' Rhody
    Are you serious?
    That comment alone convinces me you have never used an OFR, at least not to its potential.

    The FR double locking system has no equal.
     

  19. mshivy

    mshivy Most Honored Senior Member

    Sam is 100% right- is the way to do it without the locking nut

    BTW, what the hell is up with Guthrie Govan and his crazy hairdo? He looks like someone who lives in a cave , like a Neanderthal.
     
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  20. Paperback Rocker

    Paperback Rocker Nitro-mancer

    Sep 18, 2014
    Victoria TX
    I used to use my fine tuners on my Floyd all the time even though I never locked the nut due to my whammy aversion.