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interesting concept about musicians

Discussion in 'Sidewinders Bar & Grille' started by davidKOS, Mar 8, 2018.

  1. Musekatcher

    Musekatcher Strat-Talker

    Age:
    54
    482
    Jun 30, 2016
    meridianam altum centralis
    So the article is associating exceptional musical accomplishment, with career success? Eh, I don't know about that. I know a lot of consummate professionals in various fields, who aren't playing at journeyman levels, much less professional levels. I think only in the movies do athletes, physicians, lawyers and elected leaders sit down at a piano and rattle off a difficult piece with ease, or rip off a great guitar riff. Bill Clinton was weak on sax - but it made a huge impression, because we've never seen a president even play. Without knowing who he was, he'd be in the lower third of any high school jazz or pep band. I'd love to see more professionals also play seriously, but its just not happening.
     
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  2. rocknrollrich

    rocknrollrich Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    47
    Jan 8, 2016
    philadelphia
    Fair enough .
    But what about the guy/gal who can really play their instrument well (with all of the professional attributes ), but it's not how they make a living?
    I guess my question really is:
    Can we determine a professional, based on said attributes?
    This is a question I've actually thought about before. I've wondered about where I stand on the scale . I'm a good player, but I'm miles away from where I'd like to be.
    I've even made a living (a meager one, but still) at it for a few years. They were hard years financially, but I did pay the bills.
    And at this point in my life, I still make a few bucks from music , but I work a 9 to 5 to pay the mortgage and feed the family.
    Honestly, I never thought of myself as a pro. I always felt I didn't know enough , or wasn't good enough to call myself one. I still wouldn't know how to answer the question "Hey rich, are you a professional musician?".
    I'd probably say, semi pro. Still trying to reach that goal, that seems to move farther away as I get closer to it.
     
  3. fezz parka

    fezz parka Duke of DILLIGAF Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    59
    Apr 21, 2011
    Right behind you...
    No it isn't. Re-read the original post.The article was about another area of endeavor, David switched it to musicians...quite effectively I might add.
     
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  4. davidKOS

    davidKOS Musician, Composer, Teacher Strat-Talk Supporter

    May 28, 2012
    California
    All good points - exactly the type of discussion I wanted.

    BUT- you do see a connection between music and other life skills?
     
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  5. Stormy Monday

    Stormy Monday Most Honored Senior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

    Jan 19, 2011
    somewhere
    For me, music is a common language. Not sure about life skills, but being to participate in a group of people you may hardly know and not step all over others is a good thing
     
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  6. anderz

    anderz Senior Stratmaster

    May 4, 2014
    Denmark
    Whatever! It's about making music that people do not mind paying for. Not about your ability and Kurt Cobain proved that point home.

    I am not a fan of him though and don't like Nirvana but the song writing matters the most.

    Anyone can practice their ass of in a bed room and so on but it needs to be interesting to people other than guitarists.
     
    Neil.C likes this.
  7. Musekatcher

    Musekatcher Strat-Talker

    Age:
    54
    482
    Jun 30, 2016
    meridianam altum centralis
    I do believe intellect is common to success with music as well as other activities. When I see a natural musician good at his/her craft, I believe they hold some intellect, regardless if they aren't otherwise successful or distinguished. I'd suggest an accomplished musician may not have great income, and may not have acquired other skills or trade, but I'd bet they are a good conversationalist, observant, and quick witted. But that's not particularly useful, if its just an association.

    Its more powerful to suggest that the pursuit of music and fluency on an instrument build or increase intellect, and I believe that too. I also believe early development of tactile skills with hands, fingers, arms are essential to mastering fine motor skills such as exploited by musicians. I think ear development and sonic experience in the developmental stages is also important. I believe both areas can be developed later, such as adulthood but with much greater effort and time required.
     
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  8. fezz parka

    fezz parka Duke of DILLIGAF Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    59
    Apr 21, 2011
    Right behind you...
    It made me a better music editor. Cutting to picture was easy for me. :)
     
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  9. Tone Guru

    Tone Guru Senior Stratmaster

    Dec 13, 2011
    Music City TN
    The most glaring contradiction to this concept I can think of is Leo Fender himself.

    There may be some 'right-brain vs left-brain' going on here as well.
    To be truly "exceptional" (music or vocation) one needs to have a fine balance between right and left.

    Leo was undeniably a gifted inventor but lacked some inter-personal skills (as noted in a George Fullerton interview).
    He was clearly not an accomplished musician and relied on those around him to 'fill in the gaps'.
     
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  10. Malurkey

    Malurkey Senior Stratmaster

    Dec 28, 2016
    Netherlands
    The things that would make one good at music would also make one good at other things.

    But to become good at music one needs to practice and study. Time spent studying music is not spent at other things, so in that respect, becoming a highly skilled musician means foregoing other life skills.
     
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  11. fezz parka

    fezz parka Duke of DILLIGAF Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    59
    Apr 21, 2011
    Right behind you...
    The time spent is not measured in hours. You should maybe spend a half hour a day in focused study.

    Its the cumulative time...the years. It takes ten years of the type of study I mentioned above to become a competent, well rounded musician.

    There's plenty of time for learning the other life skills.
     
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  12. RobZ69

    RobZ69 Strat-O-Master

    775
    Apr 22, 2017
    The Netherlands
    Which is weird because --especially electric-- guitarists suffer from tinnitus to some degree... but maybe that helps "hearing the beat"... ;)
     
  13. fezz parka

    fezz parka Duke of DILLIGAF Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    59
    Apr 21, 2011
    Right behind you...
    I don't. Been playing 54 years, 45 of them as a gigging musician. :)
     
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  14. Stormy Monday

    Stormy Monday Most Honored Senior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

    Jan 19, 2011
    somewhere
    my tinnitus showed up before I started playing again....
     
  15. RobZ69

    RobZ69 Strat-O-Master

    775
    Apr 22, 2017
    The Netherlands
    You have obviously taken care during your career.:thumb:
     
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  16. henderman

    henderman Most Honored Senior Member

    Dec 4, 2013
    largo,fl
    The only teacher I ever learned anything from except a riff or a chord told me he believs this statistic to be true -

    if 75 people start to play an instrument, in 10 years only 1 will actually be playing an instrument.

    if that is even 1/10 true I think it cleary proves that musicians will do what it takes to get the job done and have a craftsperson's sense of pride which brings integrity into the job they do.

    We are the extra special snow flakes for sure.
     
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  17. fezz parka

    fezz parka Duke of DILLIGAF Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    59
    Apr 21, 2011
    Right behind you...
    Or been lucky.

    The point is not to paint with a broad brush. Not all (electric) guitarists suffer from tinnitus. I would say more machine shop workers suffer from tinnitus than guitarists. Note that I didn't say all. ;)
     
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  18. RobZ69

    RobZ69 Strat-O-Master

    775
    Apr 22, 2017
    The Netherlands
    I never generalize, I'm always for nuance. But all guitarist play too loud all the time... Always... If they can get away with it.
    ;)


    Nuance: maybe....some...most of the time...
     
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  19. RobZ69

    RobZ69 Strat-O-Master

    775
    Apr 22, 2017
    The Netherlands
    Yes lucky probably :)
     
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  20. RobZ69

    RobZ69 Strat-O-Master

    775
    Apr 22, 2017
    The Netherlands
    By the way, on topic, professional does not necessarily mean: good at it.

    Case in point: Madonna, who couldn't sing in tune live if her life depended on it, yet made her life depended on ...it