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Is one coat nitro laquier paint enough?

Discussion in 'DIY Strat Forum' started by gurvar, Jun 13, 2018.

  1. gurvar

    gurvar Strat-Talk Member

    Age:
    25
    18
    Feb 21, 2018
    Sweden
    Hey,
    I'm at the stage on my kinda special stratocaster project, where I'm about to start painting my guitar body and neck.

    I've read and heard that the best way to paint the guitar is with nitro laquer paint as it lets the tree breath.

    But I'm not making a traditional strat
    (Pic of my goal) http://imgur.com/8jIGrcG

    To make that work I would only be able to coat one layer.
    Now is that possible to make a decently thick layer with laquier paint or will I have to do as in the and settle with hobby paint?

    Any help is very appreciated,
    Thanks!
     
    Elvie likes this.

  2. Thrup'ny Bit

    Thrup'ny Bit Grand Master Curmudgeon Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    59
    May 21, 2010
    Sheffield, UK
    If you sprayed a living tree with nitro you would probably kill it. The purpose of paints and varnishes is to seal the surface of the wood to keep out unwanted moisture. Wood does not breath, it's dead and carefully dried before being made into guitars.
     

  3. Will Lefeurve

    Will Lefeurve Senior Stratmaster

    Mar 1, 2016
    England & France
    Well looking at your desired finish I'd say forget lacquer and read up on distressed limed oak kitchens or flooring. There's special products dedicated to that which I think will give you just the look you're after..

    Personally I don't like relics whatsoever, but I think there's something quite arty about the one in your photo.. :thumb:
     
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  4. Thrup'ny Bit

    Thrup'ny Bit Grand Master Curmudgeon Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    59
    May 21, 2010
    Sheffield, UK
    Last time I saw wood like that it was in the demolition contractor's salvage yard.
     

  5. Will Lefeurve

    Will Lefeurve Senior Stratmaster

    Mar 1, 2016
    England & France
    That's why it was 'distressed'.. o_O
     
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  6. gurvar

    gurvar Strat-Talk Member

    Age:
    25
    18
    Feb 21, 2018
    Sweden
    Yeh, articulated it wrong.. rather it's said that the tree resonate better as nitro laquier is so thin.
    If resonating wood actually is a factor in tone is probably something that alot would disagree with ;)
     

  7. Thrup'ny Bit

    Thrup'ny Bit Grand Master Curmudgeon Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    59
    May 21, 2010
    Sheffield, UK
    Solid bodied guitars were designed to eliminate resonace from amplified instruments, but we don't let facts get in the way of beliefs. Back to paint...

    One coat of paint over bare wood isnt going to achieve a lot. Hobby paint may appear to, but it's soft, not designed for this kind of use and expensive in any kind of quantity. It would wear off the neck very quickly too.

    So some kind of sealer and a few coats of colour / clear lacquer would be the best bet. Then maybe gently wiping/rubbing a rag just dampened with thinner when the paint is dry but not cured to get the effect of the picture. That's how we achieve the old wood effect on scale models.
     
    Dick Blackmore likes this.

  8. gurvar

    gurvar Strat-Talk Member

    Age:
    25
    18
    Feb 21, 2018
    Sweden
    Sry, not sure I totally understand, are u suggesting distressed wood or is it a paint?

    Just to elaborate a bit more what I've done and want to do...
    So the body and neck is already bought from Musikraft.
    The paint seen in the picture is done on a testbody with hobby paint and a oil before that which cracks the paint.
    But now for the actual body and neck I want to use more serious stuff, so as they need to be laquered I was looking into using a nitro laquier paint.
    Not sure though if that works for this project as it might be to thin when I can only use one coat.

    Hopefully that cleared some stuff up :)
     

  9. Thrup'ny Bit

    Thrup'ny Bit Grand Master Curmudgeon Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    59
    May 21, 2010
    Sheffield, UK
    If you use enamel paint and then overspray it with nitro, you'll get all the cracking you can handle.
     

  10. gurvar

    gurvar Strat-Talk Member

    Age:
    25
    18
    Feb 21, 2018
    Sweden
    Okay, thanks for the respons. I persoanlly achieved it with a oil that cracks the paint, so with this method I can't coat multiple times. Do you think one layer of sealer could be enough to get a decently thick finnish?
    If not, do you have any examples how the result is with thinner looks?
     

  11. Thrup'ny Bit

    Thrup'ny Bit Grand Master Curmudgeon Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    59
    May 21, 2010
    Sheffield, UK
    Not on guitars. I have no real interest in relics, I like my guitars to look new and shiny, even if they are 30 years old. The best place you could ask your questions, or find answers would probaby be here:
    http://www.tdpri.com/forums/finely-finished.47/
     

  12. Will Lefeurve

    Will Lefeurve Senior Stratmaster

    Mar 1, 2016
    England & France
    What I'm saying is read up on the techniques used to obtain a distressed look on limed oak kitchens or floors. That's the technique used for the look you want.

    Forget you're working on a guitar. It doesn't need more "serious stuff" to get a finish. At the end of the day its a lump of wood, just guitar shaped. Also forget about special finishes to allow the wood to breathe.. ie.. nitro. Wood is dead once it leaves a tree, and no amount of nitro will get it breathing again. All that breathing stuff is bullsh1te put about by the guitar industry.
     
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  13. gurvar

    gurvar Strat-Talk Member

    Age:
    25
    18
    Feb 21, 2018
    Sweden
    Alright, thanks for the suggestion!
    Will definitely look into that type of paint.
    I
     

  14. Thrup'ny Bit

    Thrup'ny Bit Grand Master Curmudgeon Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    59
    May 21, 2010
    Sheffield, UK
    That's the way I'd go too, if I wanted that kind of effect on anything. Reminds me of painting fake wood grain on metal panels, but that's another story...
     
    Will Lefeurve likes this.

  15. gurvar

    gurvar Strat-Talk Member

    Age:
    25
    18
    Feb 21, 2018
    Sweden
    Oh okay, I see your point.. will check it out.
    You're probably right about breathing wood and it making any tonal difference. Haven't tested out comparing guitars, so don't have a personal opinion, it's just what all "experts" suggests when I read up about it :)

    Thanks for the help
     

  16. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    72
    May 26, 2006
    Jacksonville, FL
    Man.. someone's been "reading" the worst kinda hype...

    a guitar does NOT sound like it sounds because of the wood, the pickup, the capacitor, the pots, the number of coats of paint applied... etc., etc., etc., it sounds like it sounds because it's a machine designed to produce a certain kind of signal which the amplifier converts into a useable sound at a useable volume.

    You guys don't know it, but ya actually hear more of the amp than ya do the guitar. Ya just "blame" the sound on the guitar because that's what ya see the guitarist playing.

    The reason "you" hear a sound and Identify it as being produced form a specific type of guitar has far more to do with what's being played, than what it's being played on..

    If "you" hear Frampton .. You hear a Les Paul... However were Frampton playing any of his recognizable songs on a Strat ... and you had no clue.. you would still think he's playing a Les Paul... because of the Psycho Acoustics... Do You Feel. . is recognizable. . . you know it was played on a Les Paul.. so your brain associates that "reference" knowledge with what you're currently hearing and bingo... you hear a Strat as a Les Paul... That's Science... you don't have to believe it, simply because Science couldn't give a hoot what you believe... it's not changing for "you".

    Psycho Acoustics isn't some kinda holistic mumbo jumbo... it'a as real as a fart in a Mini Cooper... your brain influences what ya think . . duh... but what it thinks is influenced by what ya put into it... fill it with shi* . . guess what your conclusions are?

    Go do some actual real experimentation, and blind experimentation at that, then come back and let's chat... it would be a pleasure...

    rk
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2018

  17. Guy Named Sue

    Guy Named Sue Beer me up Scotty Strat-Talk Supporter

    Feb 11, 2015
    Limbo
    You should be able to find a big variety of colours that can replicate what you're aiming at. Lacquer isn't one of them. Search the net for Rustic paint and you'll find your answer.
     
    Will Lefeurve likes this.

  18. TroubleClef

    TroubleClef Strat-Talk Member

    Age:
    34
    22
    Jun 30, 2018
    Sacramento
    Yeah if your guitar is breathing, then you've got bigger issues than what finish to use! :p

    Pick the finish that you think looks the best and feels the best. I choose nitro only because I prefer the way it ages... but it’s all opinion based... don’t worry about how comfortable the dead tree under your arm is.
     

  19. StratKhan

    StratKhan Strat-Talker

    140
    May 27, 2018
    North Carolina
    I’m sorry, but the condition of that guitar, I mean,.....damnnn.
    That’s just wrong!
    I would be scared of catching mold rot.
    I would finish it with a fungacide.
     
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  20. nickmsmith

    nickmsmith Most Honored Senior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

    Jul 28, 2011
    Pawnee, Indiana
    Yeah I like well done relics, that just looks like it’s been a waterlogged. Looks like What the skeletons on Pirates of the Caribbean would play.