Amplified Parts Lollar Pickups

Amplified Parts Lollar Pickups

Amplified Parts Lollar Pickups Guitar Pickups

Line out on Super XD

Discussion in 'Home Recording Studio' started by macoshark, Oct 26, 2018.

  1. macoshark

    macoshark Strat-Talker

    210
    Aug 30, 2016
    arizona
    Hey, does anyone know if running my through the out line on my Super Champ XD, into computer via interface will get my guitar signal onto whatever DAW I install. Seems like it shud and the way to run that signal. thanks
     
  2. TheDuck

    TheDuck Most Honored Senior Member

    Age:
    53
    Jan 12, 2016
    Lil' Rhody
    It should work without issue.
    What will it sound like? Well .....

    In my opinion, if you're going to go with an amp and interface, mic the amp.
     
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  3. AxemanVR

    AxemanVR I appreciate, therefore I am... Strat-Talk Supporter

    Feb 8, 2014
    Minnesota USA

    I would tend to agree, but it’s worth a try just to find out, maybe it’ll sound great!


     
  4. macoshark

    macoshark Strat-Talker

    210
    Aug 30, 2016
    arizona
    Instead of running my strat straight into the interface with no effects, can't I run a cable from my "line out" jack on the back of my amp into the interface, that way I can run delay or reverb?
     
  5. TheDuck

    TheDuck Most Honored Senior Member

    Age:
    53
    Jan 12, 2016
    Lil' Rhody
    @macoshark
    You can, but its not the best way (imo) to do it. An amp is just that, an amp. You'll want to use all its features, and one of those (an important one) is its speaker.

    Line outs dont move air, speakers do. When using an amp you'll want to capture that with a mic.
    The exception would be a modeler amp with a usb out. Though some of the modelers have good speakers, and sound better miced rather than run direct. The Fender Mustang III is a good example of that.

    If you're running the guitar to the interface, use an amp sim. Most DAWs have them built it and there's some very good free ones, and some very good low priced ones as well.

    Also, reverb and delay should come at the end of your effects chain, and / or added last when bouncing / mixing guitar tracks.
    By adding it to the incoming DAW signal, they might cause problems when you further process the tracks.
    There are a few exceptions to this rule, though they are few and far between.

    Im not great at explaining things, so I apologize if I am adding to your confusion.
    Hopefully someone will add more coherent thoughts to this thread :confused: :D
     
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  6. Thrup'ny Bit

    Thrup'ny Bit Grand Master Curmudgeon Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    59
    May 21, 2010
    Sheffield, UK
    If your amp doesn't have a headphone/record out with a cab sim, mic the amp, or go direct to the interface and use an amp sim.
     
  7. macoshark

    macoshark Strat-Talker

    210
    Aug 30, 2016
    arizona
    OK- thanks for trying to help. So Duck and Thrup are saying mic the amp OR there should be an amp,"simulator", at the interface that provides Reverb or delay? Obviously this part of recording is a given once you've actually done all this. I'll get there, an appreciate you guys trying to help me grasp how this works w/o me ever doing any of it.
     
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  8. Thrup'ny Bit

    Thrup'ny Bit Grand Master Curmudgeon Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    59
    May 21, 2010
    Sheffield, UK
    Guitar>interface>DAW>delay VST>amp sim VST>reverb VST
     
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  9. macoshark

    macoshark Strat-Talker

    210
    Aug 30, 2016
    arizona
    ok- Didn't realize so much came from the DAW.
     
  10. Thrup'ny Bit

    Thrup'ny Bit Grand Master Curmudgeon Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    59
    May 21, 2010
    Sheffield, UK
    It all depends how you want to work and what gear you have. I can set everything on my amp, then use the headphone (or USB) out to record. Micing the amp really isn't an option that the household authorities allow me.
     
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  11. sadmoodyfrazier

    sadmoodyfrazier Strat-Talker

    Age:
    32
    109
    Sep 23, 2018
    Italy
    You can do much better. You can hook up the amp with USB and it will act just like a sound card. You can set it as input and record it just the same way you do with line out. Line out is for run it in a mixer to have more volume in a live contest. Anyway a good mic in front of the speaker is always the best solution. If you directly record the amp is quite like you record using a software like amplitube or similar.
     
  12. AxemanVR

    AxemanVR I appreciate, therefore I am... Strat-Talk Supporter

    Feb 8, 2014
    Minnesota USA

    I also have one of these:

    E6516091-80F4-4D41-8A72-40C044F48A44.jpeg

    It hooks up to your amp’s speaker output.

    I have made some excellent recordings using it, but it did required a bit of studio processing...

    Mic Preamp > Compressor > EQ > Reverb > Interface > DAW

    ...so it’s obviously not for everyone.

    Not sure if you’d get the same results using virtual processing.

    That said, if you want to capture the character of your amp (especially if you’re going for a cranked amp sound) the Cab Clone is one viable option.


     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2018
  13. Thrup'ny Bit

    Thrup'ny Bit Grand Master Curmudgeon Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    59
    May 21, 2010
    Sheffield, UK
    9 cats out of 10 can't tell the difference.
     
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  14. macoshark

    macoshark Strat-Talker

    210
    Aug 30, 2016
    arizona
    You guys lost me. What is a "sound card"?
    USBor head phone from amp into.what??-interface..DAW. I'm really proud I know what a DAW is now!
     
  15. TheDuck

    TheDuck Most Honored Senior Member

    Age:
    53
    Jan 12, 2016
    Lil' Rhody
    A usb out from the amp plugs straight in the computer. No interface needed.

    A sound card is simply the piece of hardware that ... wait for it .... makes sound come out of your computer ;)

    If you use an interface, the interface becomes your computers sound card.
     
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  16. Thrup'ny Bit

    Thrup'ny Bit Grand Master Curmudgeon Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    59
    May 21, 2010
    Sheffield, UK
    A USB Audio interface that plugs into your computer is an external sound card. My amp also acts as an external soundcard. Inside (most) computers there is a basic soundcard.
     
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  17. macoshark

    macoshark Strat-Talker

    210
    Aug 30, 2016
    arizona
    OK- then it's not rally a card, sort of misleading but what do I know. My Super champ XD doesn't have a port for a USB. So back to micing my SCXD into the 212 then into the DAW. when you mentioned an ",amp sim" is that something already in the DAW or another external device?
     
  18. Thrup'ny Bit

    Thrup'ny Bit Grand Master Curmudgeon Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    59
    May 21, 2010
    Sheffield, UK
    An amp sim can either be a stand alone program you install on your computer and plays back through your 212 to speakers or headphones, or a VST plugin that you load into your DAW. Some DAWs come with them as standard plugins, others don't. If you mic your amp, you don't need one.
     
  19. TheDuck

    TheDuck Most Honored Senior Member

    Age:
    53
    Jan 12, 2016
    Lil' Rhody
    The term Sound Card comes from the first days of the PC when all “accessories” plugged into the main board via pcie slots, and yes, sound, video and modem /ethernet cards actually looked like credit cards.
    Sort of.

    @macoshark, you are asking the same questions multiple times. Go back and read the posts in this thread.
    Then, read them again. ;)
    Theres a wealth of knowledge for you here. :thumb:
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2018
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  20. Thrup'ny Bit

    Thrup'ny Bit Grand Master Curmudgeon Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    59
    May 21, 2010
    Sheffield, UK
    LOL my first Soundblaster sound card plugged into an ISA slot, not PCI or PCIE.
     
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