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Neckage. Lead & or Rhythm

Discussion in 'Stratocaster Discussion Forum' started by Fred 31, Oct 12, 2017.

  1. Fred 31

    Fred 31 Strat-Talk Member

    Age:
    39
    37
    Oct 3, 2017
    NY
    Hi guys, I was wondering if some strat necks lend themselves more to one thing or another. as is some being better suited for Lead work while others more ideal for Rhythm.

    I have what I think is an old style type neck (from warmoth), it is Thick, like bat, you could beat someone with it.
    Did Fender ever produce necks like I'm describing on some of the more vintage Strats?
    I doubt warmoth just decided to make this thick ass neck for the hell of it?

    I like the beefy qualities of it cause it really gives me something substantial to put may hands around, seems ideal for heavy gauge strings for rhythm playing (I know Stevie used very heavy strings and he was playing blistering leads) .

    I'm not necessarily a lead guy but I know other guitars (Gibson SGs for instance) have a substantially "thinner/faster" kind of neck, which I would think would be better or easier for playing lead.

    Curious to see what you guys have to say about this.

    Thanks in advance!
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2017

  2. spizike231

    spizike231 Strat-Talker

    Age:
    24
    153
    Feb 9, 2017
    California
    I think the pickups and tone knobs decide that more than the guitar.
     
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  3. fezz parka

    fezz parka Wiggler of Sticks Strat-Talk Supporter

    Yes. :D
     

  4. spizike231

    spizike231 Strat-Talker

    Age:
    24
    153
    Feb 9, 2017
    California
    I’ve also wanted to try a beefy neck one day but can’t find a Strat that has it.

    Mayer and SRV strats have it I hear but haven’t held one.
     

  5. Ebidis

    Ebidis Most Honored Senior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    51
    Nov 14, 2013
    Alabama
    It is all subjective. It depends entirely on what you think feels and sounds good. No shape of neck is really "better" for one thing more than another, unless you think it is. What you like is all that counts for your guitar.

    Sorry but there is no other real answer.
     
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  6. Fred 31

    Fred 31 Strat-Talk Member

    Age:
    39
    37
    Oct 3, 2017
    NY
    Really, I can see that being the case for tone (along with wood type etc.) but the feel of the neck is Substantially thicker than you find from any off the shelf Strat, MIM or otherwise (except maybe the Stevie model). I'm new to a lot of this so I am still curious about this topic.
    Thanks all the same.
     

  7. spizike231

    spizike231 Strat-Talker

    Age:
    24
    153
    Feb 9, 2017
    California
    Sorry I re read your post.

    I thought you were asking if the guitar itself can lend itself to lead or rhythm.

    Can necks?

    Yes, but it varies by the player. One player might find that a bigger neck is good for leads and great for rhythm, and another player might find the reverse for their hands.

    All depends on hand size and comfortability.
     
    Fred 31 likes this.

  8. The Ballzz

    The Ballzz Strat-O-Master

    808
    Feb 26, 2014
    LAS VEGAS , NV
    A really great player is neither a "rhythm" or "lead" player. Licks come in between chords and rhythms blend into solos and back & forth, and in & out for a wild orgy of musical goodness! Solos/licks can be "rhythmic" in and of themselves and chords can be solos. The day that I forgot whether I was actually playing "rhythm" chords or "lead" figures/intervals was my day of epiphany! Now, I'm just a guitarist! Ponder the above words and if you "GET IT" welcome to the club. If not, simply enjoy being a "lead" or "rhythm" player. Of course, most of my musical career has been either in three piece bands or at least the only guitarist, so a lot of territory has been needed to be covered.
    Just My $.02 & Likely Worth Even Less!
    Gene
     

  9. Tone Guru

    Tone Guru Senior Stratmaster

    Dec 13, 2011
    Music City TN
    Most certainly, Yes.
    There are several noticeably different neck profiles.
    These are usually denoted by a letter, such as "V", "C", "D" or "U".
    One of the more iconic neck profiles is the '50s V style as used by Clapton among others, and reissued in 1982 on the '57 AVRI.

    There is also the neck's width specification, also noted by a letter.
    By far the most common Strat neck width is "B", (1 5/8") with the narrower A and wider C and D special order and fairly rare.

    Another specification is the fretboard radius.
    The standard radius on vintage Strats was 7.25".
    A flatter 9.5" radius was introduced in the '80s.
    Since then several different radii such as the Gibson-like 12" have been used on various models.
    There are also several different compound radii available.

    I think you might like the fatter D or U profiles.
     
    Fred 31 likes this.

  10. stratman323

    stratman323 Dr. Stratster Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    57
    Apr 21, 2010
    London, UK
    No, not at all. If you prefer slimmer necks, they will be better for you whether you're playing rhythm, lead, or any combination of the two. And if you prefer fatter necks, the same thing applies.

    It's purely personal preference, though the size of a player's hands will probably influence this. Choose a neck that suits you, fat or slim, & ignore anyone else who tells you that it's "wrong" in some way. If it works for you, it isn't.
     
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  11. Fred 31

    Fred 31 Strat-Talk Member

    Age:
    39
    37
    Oct 3, 2017
    NY
    Absolutely, Defiinietly get it and agree wholeheartedly, I was merely musing whether a slimmer neck would necessarily be more useful or better suited to a more melodic kind of playing as in lead work. I know harmonic playing can also have a melodic quality especially if you have that moving bass line in your chord progressions.

    I personally just play guitar, (not particularly good at either format) I dont think I've ever approached it thinking, today I'm going to play like a rhythm guitarist.
    More accurately, I play with the guitar, for me all stringed instruments are fun and keep me entertained

    I have average hands with somehwat long fingers, but nothing unusual. Not like Stevie or Pete Townshend who are just Monsters on the guitar. I used to have 13s on one of them and 11s on the other, now that I'm getting older I'll probably move down to 12s on one and 10s respectively, 10s on the one I intend to revamp and put a new tremolo.
    I see some players who rely or overdo bends when playing, to the point that it just looks and sound like a cheap gimmick, put some 13s on those guitars and most of them will have to learn how to play instead of relying so much on bends.
    My two strats bot have the fatter thicker kind of neck and I like em fine. I just remember a friend of mine who was over at my house once commenting on how the necks were like bats, I gather he probably never experienced one or the heavier strings, I dont know, but his comment made me wonder if I had set them up incorrectly some how, it planted doubt in my mind.

    I have an old ibanez prestige that has that gibson like thin profile neck, thats what started me wondering down this road.

    Thank you for all your answers guys, very informative and much appreciated.
     

  12. Ebidis

    Ebidis Most Honored Senior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    51
    Nov 14, 2013
    Alabama
    Well there's an absolute for you. What works well, and feels good for one person may be the exact opposite for another. There are no absolutes.
     
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  13. Ebidis

    Ebidis Most Honored Senior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    51
    Nov 14, 2013
    Alabama
    As someone who bends a lot, I will go the other way and say; perhaps if you used lighter strings you could incorporate more bending in your style. It can be a very expressive, emotive technique. :D
     
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  14. Cesspit

    Cesspit Strat-Talker

    Age:
    61
    186
    Sep 4, 2016
    Oxford England
    I'm with Ebidis here. I don't like really skinny or really fat necks but I can live with both if I have too. I don't really buy into the lead OR rhythm theory either, I just play guitar and I'm a strat guy. Each to their own as Ebidis says, there is no right or wrong.
     
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  15. Fred 31

    Fred 31 Strat-Talk Member

    Age:
    39
    37
    Oct 3, 2017
    NY
    Very true, and who doesnt appreciate some good bends, I was basically referring to some players who kinda over do it with bending, myself included when I was first learning, its a cool thing..."hey check it out! Im bending".
    For me at least I'm beggining to suspect that lighter gauge strings would probably facilitate a more linear/melodic kind of playing, the neck probably doesnt have as much bearing on this as I originally imagined. I do love me Stats necks and all.
    Cheers!
     

  16. amstratnut

    amstratnut Peace thru Music. Strat-Talk Supporter

    Dec 1, 2009
    My house.
    I tend to go "medium" with most guitar related stuff.

    The extremes may seem good at first but then it can be like too much of a good thing. Ymmv.
     
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  17. BallisticSquid

    BallisticSquid Senior Stratmaster

    Oct 12, 2016
    US
    I have one guitar with a thick neck...my LP Trad Pro ii...it has the "50's style" Gibson neck. I can play it as well as my other ones. When I pick it up, I notice the difference in the neck and it feels nice...but shortly thereafter I forget about it.

    It can be useful to have a different geometry to avoid straining the same muscles in the same way all of the time. I recently went through a period of playing a LOT, much more than I ever have. I noticed that my fretting hand was starting to hurt when playing power and barre chords. I decided to try playing my thicker necked guitar thinking I would get different leverage. It actually helped!!

    I find I can do double stops, like in the beginning of Brown Eyed Girl, easier with a thicker neck.
     
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  18. fezz parka

    fezz parka Wiggler of Sticks Strat-Talk Supporter

    Play what is comfortable for you.

    Once you find that comfort, then being a better player just depends on your goals and the time and practice needed to achieve those goals. FWIW, its all rhythm. Playing in time. A mid level player who plays in time is much more listenable than a technically advanced player who can't find the 1. :D
     

  19. owenmoney

    owenmoney Strat-Talker

    119
    Jun 21, 2013
    I agree, like Keith Richards says, you don’t go to the shop and ask for a lead guitar or rhythm guitar, you’re a guitar player and you play a guitar ! Personally I thing people over analyze things way too much and get obsessive about trivial things. If you like a guitar , it feels good, sounds good, you’re good to go !
     

  20. The Ballzz

    The Ballzz Strat-O-Master

    808
    Feb 26, 2014
    LAS VEGAS , NV
    Fezz,

    The more I read and hear from you, the more I respect you! You truly seem to "GET IT!" :cool:

    Just Sayin'
    Gene
     
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