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New guitar, first strat! Classic Vibe 50s

Discussion in 'Squier Strat Forum' started by Padawan, Aug 30, 2017.

  1. aussieblues

    aussieblues Strat-Talk Member

    19
    Apr 1, 2017
    australia
    congratulations they are a lovely guitar, they feel nice and sound great, quality squiers, enjoy
     

  2. nederemer

    nederemer Strat-Talker

    Age:
    31
    324
    Oct 25, 2017
    Somerset, Kentucky, USA.
    So basically I'll give you the long and short (ha ha ha intonation joke there) of intonation. What are you doing in intonation? Altering the length of the string. All of us know the 12th fret has a harmonic, what you may not know is that harmonic is precisely in the center of the string. So, the goal with intonation is to make the string the correct length by either shortening or lengthening it via adjustments on the saddles. How is this accomplished you ask? Tune your guitar to pitch (you'll need a fairly good tuner for this) then, play the string open, and then the harmonic at the 12th. They should both be tuned to the exact same pitch. Moving the saddle will flatten or sharpen the note and allow you to tune it to the proper pitch. It's pretty simple really. Just takes a lot of tuning, I was always told you needed to loosen the string to adjust the saddle I don't know if that's true or not, but it probably wouldn't hurt. Just remember tune to pitch then compare against the harmonic.
     
    gilmourstrat and Boognish like this.

  3. Jeffl

    Jeffl New Member!

    Age:
    60
    5
    Apr 19, 2017
    Toronto
    I was just working in a store setting up a bunch of guitars, and I preferred the CV Strats to the Mexican ones.
     

  4. stratman323

    stratman323 Dr. Stratster Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    57
    Apr 21, 2010
    London, UK
    Congratulations - that's a great first Strat. To pinch a phrase commonly used on here about those Classic Vibes, they punch well above their weight. Buy one secondhand & you get an even bigger bargain!
     
    Stratoskater likes this.

  5. jimnh

    jimnh New Member!

    7
    Oct 27, 2017
    New Hampshire
    Good write-up, but I think you mean that you play the harmonic, then fret the string at the 12th fret, and they should be the same. If the fretted note is low, shorten the string length and vice versa.
     
    simoncroft likes this.

  6. fattboyzz

    fattboyzz Strat-Talker Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    52
    146
    Sep 24, 2017
    Sharpsburg ,Ga.
    I'm definitely jelly :0)

    Congrats on your first Strat !
     

  7. Mr Peabody

    Mr Peabody Strat-Talker

    155
    Oct 11, 2016
    The Deep South
    Funny thing is, the only Strats I've owned (do own) are all either Custom Shops or American Vintage Reissues, ergo, all with vintage Kluson tuners; they're the only ones I'm familiar with. I reckon I'd screw up with just about every other type when it comes to restringing... :)
     

  8. Mr Peabody

    Mr Peabody Strat-Talker

    155
    Oct 11, 2016
    The Deep South
    Nice one... I envy the thrill & excitement of bringing home something as 'new & special' as this.
     

  9. Traitor Joe

    Traitor Joe Strat-Talk Member

    Age:
    27
    73
    Apr 25, 2017
    Riverside, CA
    Congratulations on a very formidable first strat! Those things are seriously awesome. I will eventually get around to learning how to set my guitar up myself but in the meantime... I had my tech set up my trusty old MIM Satin Stratocaster and now it's a MAGICAL guitar. If I may be so bold, I recommend getting one done by a pro ASAP. The difference will be way more stark than night and day if it's done as "right" as mine was. I also had him block the trem for what that tidbit's worth.

    I also need contouring in my life so I (actually my Dad did it for me) sawed off a chunk of my American Standard Telecaster... Now she's got a nice forearm contour!

    [​IMG]
     

  10. Archangelmm

    Archangelmm Strat-Talk Member

    Age:
    56
    22
    Jun 13, 2017
    Valrico, Fl
    Welcome, that is the exact Strat I bought last year from Sweetwater and could not be happier, the Classic Vibe Strat’s & Tele’s are the best bang for your buck out there, I absolutely love my 50’s 2 Tone Burst, it’s light, the fit and finish is flawless, the neck is smooth and comfortable, I plan on buying the Classic Vibe Butterscotch Blonde Tele soon.
     
    johnnymg likes this.

  11. FormerTeleGuy

    FormerTeleGuy Senior Stratmaster

    Nov 17, 2013
    Oak Lawn, IL
    Absolutely gorgeous guitar. Enjoy it and play the heck out of it.
     

  12. steben

    steben Senior Stratmaster

    Aug 9, 2012
    Zulte, Belgium
    in love mode! 50ties style is my favourite.
    This guitar reminds me of Robert Cray.[​IMG]
     

  13. sonny wolf

    sonny wolf Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    45
    Aug 7, 2009
    austin texas
    Congratulations...those are amazing guitars!!
     
    PastorDATM and T Guitar Floyd like this.

  14. stratman323

    stratman323 Dr. Stratster Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    57
    Apr 21, 2010
    London, UK
    Anyone who can play a Strat should be able to set a Strat up themselves. It's so easy even I can do it (assuming that no fret stoning is needed). And you get it done exactly the way you want it, not just some random guitar guy's preference.

    And it will save you a fortune over the years.
     
    Ebidis likes this.

  15. Traitor Joe

    Traitor Joe Strat-Talk Member

    Age:
    27
    73
    Apr 25, 2017
    Riverside, CA
    I would definitely not discourage the idea of learning how to do it yourself, but I don't regret getting it done right the first time by my awesome luthier. And if you find the right luthier, it won't be to "some random guy's preference;" they will work with you, ask you how hard you play, what gauge strings you'll use, etc.

    Getting your guitar exactly how you want it NOW (however long the luthier's backlog is) without the learning curve of trying to do it yourself for the first time is what I recommend. Then you can take all the measurements you want of the guitar that's exactly to your preferences and keep your guitar well setup yourself as opposed to trying to get it perfect as a complete beginner.

    I guess my point is that a perfectly setup guitar is a very magical thing indeed. It'll be a bit of a process to get it exactly right the first time you start fiddling, or you can spend the money to have someone do it professionally, including things like dressing frets. As awesome as your Squier may be, I'd be willing to bet that a good luthier would do some magic to the frets that you almost certainly wouldn't (no offense, this is highly specialized work) be able to do on your first whack at a setup. Especially without the exact right tools. I'm in California and I paid $75 (which, since everything else is more expensive here, is probably among the more expensive prices to pay, but I honestly have no idea) to have all my frets dressed, intonation set, action, everything under the sun. Even stuff I'm sure that I don't even know about was taken care of. For me, that $75 is worth worlds more spent on the pro setup than on, say, GFS pickups & full sized pots.
     
    Viking likes this.

  16. stratman323

    stratman323 Dr. Stratster Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    57
    Apr 21, 2010
    London, UK
    No, it really isn't. Nothing magical whatsoever. Sure it's a skilled job, but nothing like as skilled as playing the guitar. A guitarist is a "musician", the bloke who sets his Strat up for him is simply a "technician". He has skills but they can be learned relatively easily.

    If you can manage to play the guitar, setting that guitar up is a mere walk in the park in comparison. And, doing so teaches you more about your chosen instrument. Don't put guitar techs on a pedestal - that's where musicians belong.

    And I wish you wouldn't keep calling these people "luthiers". A luthier is "is someone who builds or repairs string instruments generally consisting of a neck and a sound box.". Most guitar techs wouldn't have any more idea how to build an acoustic guitar from scratch than I would. And the kind of set-up work we're discussing here doesn't even count as "repairs" - it's simply minor tweaks on a guitar designed to be easy to maintain by the very practical engineer who designed it.

    And although I regard fret work as something to take to a tech, sadly many techs don't know what they're doing. Some hear the term "fret level" (a misnomer that I avoid) & believe that they simply have to file the tops of the frets level! I've bought a couple of used guitars like that - hard to imagine that some clowns charge good money for failing to understand what their job is. Apart from fret work - DIY!
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2017
    craigh and Ebidis like this.

  17. Ebidis

    Ebidis Most Honored Senior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    51
    Nov 14, 2013
    Alabama
    +1 to everything you said.
     

  18. Traitor Joe

    Traitor Joe Strat-Talk Member

    Age:
    27
    73
    Apr 25, 2017
    Riverside, CA
    Agree to disagree. And I will continue to call my guy a luthier because that's what he is. I maintain my stance that taking even a brand new off the shelf guitar to a real luthier is worth every penny.

    Sorry to hear you've had such bad experiences with techs!
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2017

  19. stratman323

    stratman323 Dr. Stratster Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    57
    Apr 21, 2010
    London, UK
    How do you know that when you've never tried doing the work yourself?
     
    Thrup'ny Bit likes this.

  20. Thrup'ny Bit

    Thrup'ny Bit Certified Curmudgeon Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    58
    May 21, 2010
    In my own little world
    And if you're an absolute beginner how do you know that your godike "luthier" has done good job. I've never got a guitar back that I didn't have to fettle to get it to how I like it.