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Paint primer

Discussion in 'DIY Strat Forum' started by glen smith, Oct 26, 2011.

  1. glen smith

    glen smith New Member!

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    Hi folks, I have a strat guitar kit and I want to paint the body with rattle can Lake Placid Blue. Is there a recommended primer to use that will make the LPB look its best? Should I apply a clear coat over the LPB?
     
  2. stradovarious

    stradovarious Senior Stratmaster

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    Use Krylon Spray Paint, they make a nice (or very close) LPB but make certain that it is Krylon specifically for PLASTICS (the poly on your guitar is in fact a member of the "plastic" family).

    No primer needed. I have painted 3 guitars with plastic-formulated Krylon and one is over a year old, great results and zero problems.

    Take lots of time between coats; I only needed 3. let each coat dry 24 hrs minimum before next coat.

    Drawbacks: You end up with more stuff than ever, coating the wood of your guitar. I don't care about that part and cannot hear the difference. Others say it is bad for your sound.

    Maybe I am going deaf (also, "clean playing" may be affected by painting in this way; I wouldn't know, since "clean playing" is against my religion except for when I play my classical guitars, which I do for 2-3 hours daily as I have for 32+ years).

    After my classicals go in their cases, I am finished playing "clean" for the day. Give me triple rectified style gain and the filthiest possible distortion plus reverb plus a touch of delay when I strap on my Strats, or I'd rather go back to playing some pristine Bach on my nylon string guitars.

    Electric playing is my catharsis, it is my therapy, it is how I get my frustrations/ anxieties/ anger out. Turn it up to "eleven", I say! YEAH:twisted:!
     
  3. glen smith

    glen smith New Member!

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    Thanks a lot Stradovarious. Would you happen to have the product number on that Krylon LPB look-alike? Should I add a clear coat or is it not necessary?
     
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  5. glen smith

    glen smith New Member!

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    While we are on this subject, does anyone know of a good equivalent for Candy Cola Red?
     
  6. rcole_sooner

    rcole_sooner Most Honored Senior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

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    For solid opaque colors, I like to use this as a primer.

    [​IMG]

    I actually brush it on, and then sand it level. It sands very easy.

    It is under this finish.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. jflintmac

    jflintmac Most Honored Senior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

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    Since your guitar body is new and unfinished, I would reccomend using better quality paints than Krylon products. They are really bottom of the line paints but they will work.

    Still, going on bare wood, you should use a primer as you do need a solid base coat with some sealing properties.
    If I were you I would go to a proper paint store such as Glidden or Royal City paints or what ever your local professional paint companies are.
    They fill Aerosol cans with what ever color you are looking for. The cost a little more than home depot but they will sell you much better paint. You want real Lacquer. It looks and wears better than plastic coatings, as well as provides better tonal qualities.

    If you are repainting on top of an existing finish, then I guess it doesn't really matter what you use but when it is raw wood, you actually stand a chance of coming up with a good sounding guitar.
    Paint is extremely heavy. You don't really want to use 5 or 6 cans of paint to do a finish. At half a pound per can, it adds up fast.

    2 thin coats of primer... (white or black)
    2 thin coats of color paint...
    2 - 4 Thin coats of clear Lacquer if you can.

    Depending on the conditions in your environment, you can do a beautiful finish using what I described above. I have heard of many people who will put on 10 coats of lacquer or more. That will look good providing you get no dust between coats but don't forget, you are doing a musical instrument.
    Less is definately better.

    Time is what makes it nice. Cureing time.
    I do a finish over about a week all together, allowing each coat plenty of time for each coat to dry well before lightly sanding. I do not sand the final color coat. I spray the lacquer on it and sand that after it has dried for at least a day.
    Then I spray on my final coat or coats of lacquer and I let it cure for at least a month, maybe 2 months. At this point you can wet sand if you wish but I seldom do unless I am building the guitar to sell.
    Cure time is the best thing you can use for a good finish.

    Zinzer does make a good sealer primer. It dries hard as glass. (keep it thin)
     
  8. glen smith

    glen smith New Member!

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    rcole, the pink looks great!
    jflintmac, thanks a lot, just the type of info I am looking for. Of course I want to achieve a high quality finish that will look like a million bucks but without the cost.
    I have a few rattle cans of nitrocellulose sanding sealer, primer, gloss clear coat, neck amber, satin clear coat, and a few colors. I plan on eventually doing more guitars so I am stocking up on tech-tips in the meantime.
    Thank you to everyone who so generously spread the knowledge and to the webmasters of this Forum.
     
  9. Celeste

    Celeste Senior Stratmaster

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    I do not find much difference between B I N and Killz. I know Killz is available in a spray can, I don't recall if I have seen B I N in a spray can. Both have a lot of talc in them, they sand well, but load the paper very fast, so if you have compressed air available, use it often to clean the work and the paper.
     
  10. Holoflash

    Holoflash Strat-O-Master

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    H.D. sells glass jar type containers that connect to disposable air cans so you can mix your own primer/paint. I used them to paint one of my axes, worked well.
     
  11. rcole_sooner

    rcole_sooner Most Honored Senior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

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    Yeah, I have not worked up the courage to spray it yet. I guess I need to go to Harbor Freight a get a cheap dedicated spray gun just for the BIN.

    I thought BIN and Killz was the same stuff.
     
  12. Rufuskyote

    Rufuskyote Strat-Talker

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    I could be wrong, but I believe that KILZ is Bins with some sort of anti-microbial agent mixed in to cover water or moisture damage, to prevent mildew problems.
    (Hence the name "Kilz")

    I have used Bins with no problems and like the way it covers and sands flat.

    Nice Strat, btw. ;)
     
  13. Tele like it is

    Tele like it is Left is right! Strat-Talk Supporter

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    Why not just use the Re-Ranch products... They're marketed for this purpose and the have LPB available... And it's Nitro so you'll have Mojo, Vibe, and your guitar will breath and have toniness and vintageness.
     
  14. Celeste

    Celeste Senior Stratmaster

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    To a lot of people it is cost prohibitive, either from a financial stand point or from being offended by being charged over $10 a can for spray paint. I have used ReRanch products before, but it is unlikely I will again. Personally I am most likely to make the move to water born products for cost, ease of clean up and environmental reasons
     
  15. ghostwolf

    ghostwolf Super Moderator Staff Member

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    +1 on the initial cost. Bill knows he's got a huge chunk of the nitro market, i suspect this is a large part of why reranch prices are so high. on top of that, to pay $16 for a can of color that the average user will only use half of at most on a single guitar makes it even more cost prohibitive, in my opinion.
     
  16. Tele like it is

    Tele like it is Left is right! Strat-Talk Supporter

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    In that case, how 'bout a can of Deft from Home Depot for $6-8? You won't get LPB, but the clear is real Nitro and works well.
     
  17. ghostwolf

    ghostwolf Super Moderator Staff Member

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    i've used Deft for 30+ years. great stuff.
     
  18. glen smith

    glen smith New Member!

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    Canadian distributors of the original finishes must be hiding in the woods, can't find any.
     

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