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Power strips and conditioners

Discussion in 'Tech-Talk' started by Kstu, Feb 13, 2018.

  1. Kstu

    Kstu Strat-Talker

    Age:
    42
    437
    Oct 18, 2017
    Everett, Massachusetts
    One side of my music room I have some amps plugged into a Fender power conditioner. The other side of my room I have my deluxe plugged into a regular 6 plug adapter/strip which is full now and I would like to add my Roland, Vox and a Superchamp x2 in the next day or so.

    Is there any harm or danger to plugging in another conditioner or even just a regular power strip to the power strip that is already there? I only use one amp at a time. I do have my computer in the same strip with it's speakers and monitor. Or only one strip to an outlet?
     

  2. Deschain

    Deschain Strat-Talker

    Age:
    52
    181
    Jun 23, 2017
    Denmark
    You can cascade as many power strips as you want, as long as the equipment you plug in doesn't exceed the wattage/amp/fuse of your mains installation.

    However, you may get noise issues with different equipment connect to the same power strip(s).
     

  3. Raiders757

    Raiders757 Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    47
    Sep 2, 2016
    Virginia
    That is not a good idea and I wouldn't listen to anyone that says it's OK. Daisy chaining power strips is just not worth the risk, as it's is a fire hazard waiting to happen.
     
    Borgatomic likes this.

  4. Deschain

    Deschain Strat-Talker

    Age:
    52
    181
    Jun 23, 2017
    Denmark
    Why is that?
     

  5. Kstu

    Kstu Strat-Talker

    Age:
    42
    437
    Oct 18, 2017
    Everett, Massachusetts
    Thanks all.
     

  6. 8T_BoCO

    8T_BoCO Aspiring Stratospheric Stratitician Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    47
    738
    Mar 2, 2016
    Colorado
    Too much resistance creates heat > arc or spark > fire.
     
    Raiders757 likes this.

  7. Raiders757

    Raiders757 Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    47
    Sep 2, 2016
    Virginia
    What 8T_BoCO said. Many a fire has been caused by daisy chaining power strips. It is advisable to avoid doing so. Best to save up and buy one of the larger commercial rated strips from your local hardware store.
     

  8. Deschain

    Deschain Strat-Talker

    Age:
    52
    181
    Jun 23, 2017
    Denmark
    Where is that resistance created?
     

  9. Kstu

    Kstu Strat-Talker

    Age:
    42
    437
    Oct 18, 2017
    Everett, Massachusetts
    How did I not think of this. Even my fender strip has more plugs.
     

  10. 8T_BoCO

    8T_BoCO Aspiring Stratospheric Stratitician Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    47
    738
    Mar 2, 2016
    Colorado
    Primarily at the plugs, since the materials used are not as electrically conductive as the copper wire in the house wiring.
    Less conductivity means more resistance for the same number of Amps that are trying to flow through this connection.
    If a connection gets hot enough, the heat can damage it (chemically oxidize the connection surfaces) such that their resistance becomes even greater.
    Force that same quantity of Amps through a compromised connection and you will eventually have spark & fire.

    2018-02-14 07_24_47-(10) Is it safe to plug power bars into power bars_ - YouTube.png

    Now, if all you ever have connected are loads that total a few Amps and a few hundred Watts (say, a couple of pedal power supplies), you're far less at risk.
    Doing so with a high-current draw heater, power tool or amplifier is really asking for trouble.
    If you have to cover a longer distance between the wall socket and a high electrical load you wish to plug in, do what @Raiders757 said and get a heavy duty extension cord designed for it.
     
    Raiders757 likes this.

  11. Groovey

    Groovey Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    57
    Nov 17, 2016
    NC. USA
    Many folks won't consider the draw on the circuit. Just that if there are more outlets it must be good.

    Just like as long as there are checks the check book, I must have money?
     
    vlxerdon likes this.

  12. Deschain

    Deschain Strat-Talker

    Age:
    52
    181
    Jun 23, 2017
    Denmark
    So, if it only takes one bad connection between plug and socket, combined with a high load, it could also happen with just one power strip.

    A standard extension cord (we are not talking 100+ feet here) can without problem take the current that your fuse is rated at. I.e. the fuse will blow before the cord catches fire.

    Or, am I missing something here (which wouldn't surprise me..) :)
     

  13. johnnymg

    johnnymg Senior Stratmaster Strat-Talk Supporter

    Sep 5, 2015
    Central Coast Ca
    In a perfect world it might not make any difference ..................... but the world isn't perfect:

    http://www.interpower.com/ic/designers/white-papers/not-safe-daisy-chaining-power-strips.html
     

  14. Deschain

    Deschain Strat-Talker

    Age:
    52
    181
    Jun 23, 2017
    Denmark

  15. moullineaux

    moullineaux Strat-O-Master

    908
    Jul 11, 2009
    ATLANTA, GA
    I learned the hard way not to daisy chain power strips. Luckily as a dumb youth and nothing burned. In fact an electrician acquaintance of mine taught me a good lesson about extension cords. Most extension cords are 14 or 16 gauge and can be used with average electrical devices( drills, skill saws, lamps, etc. However, even they can heat up a typical cord. I switched to heavy 12 gauge cords along time ago and because there is more copper in the cord there is less resistance i.e. less heat. Haven’t had a burn out or heat up since. They cost more but are worth it imho.