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Practical Jazz Workshop #2

Discussion in 'Sidewinders Bar & Grille' started by davidKOS, May 5, 2018.

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  1. Omar

    Omar Most Inquisitive Junior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

    Aug 9, 2017
    Marbella, Spain
    I played only the head part along with the backing track several times till then if the track. After many trials, I started soloing after playing the head twice. Unconsciously, my fingers went back to playing head after the solo part. I guess you have to feel the cycle. As Chris always says, play without thinking. Relax and let yourself loose.
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2018
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  2. Omar

    Omar Most Inquisitive Junior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

    Aug 9, 2017
    Marbella, Spain
    One question:

    Some of the goals of this workshop are:

    1. Know how to play cycle progression.
    2. Play the changes when soloing
    3. Practice swing strumming style

    How can I successfully adopt first point and able it to a totally new song? E.g. if I want to compose my own song, how can I make it different than songs that use the same progression?
     
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  3. davidKOS

    davidKOS Musician, Composer, Teacher Strat-Talk Supporter

    May 28, 2012
    California
    Attention is so important in jazz - stuff happens so fast that you have to be on it to play it.
     
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  4. Cerb

    Cerb Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    38
    Jan 22, 2016
    Sweden
    I get the concept of paying attention and why it's important. It's just difficult to do many things simultaneously, like paying attention, playing, breathing...
     

  5. davidKOS

    davidKOS Musician, Composer, Teacher Strat-Talk Supporter

    May 28, 2012
    California
    Yes, this is what I mean about not just knowing the melody or the changes but also the form.

    In some ways, it's as easy as keeping track of the melody as you solos.

    Otherwise, you need to keep the form in your head.

    Form is a crucial element in playing all sorts of musics - but in jazz, it means that even when the melody stops, as in during a solo, the idea of the melody and the chord changes continues.

    So there are many reasons why when soloing it's harder to keep track of the form than when just playing the head - but concentrating - as in attention - to the pattern of the chords will keep the structure intact.
     
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  6. davidKOS

    davidKOS Musician, Composer, Teacher Strat-Talk Supporter

    May 28, 2012
    California
    You sound like me sometimes when I overthink things.

    so, everything else you are mentioning has value in terms of learning music - but for this exercise, don't overthink it.

    and yes, practice needed...well we all need more practice! It's never enough;)

    Seriously, though, I know this workshop is not easy-going do-whatever like a lot of other stuff in guitar world.

    I don't think you'd post on this thread if you weren't interested, either in being a better jazz player or just a better guitar player - either way, it's cool.

    So relax, and don't try to bite off more than you can chew at one time.

    I suggest working on keeping the form when soloing.

    Thanks for participating.
     
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  7. davidKOS

    davidKOS Musician, Composer, Teacher Strat-Talk Supporter

    May 28, 2012
    California
    Good, you need to know the changes before you can really solos!

    And it's OK to play the melody that way, as long as you know it is your own choices.:thumb:
     
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  8. davidKOS

    davidKOS Musician, Composer, Teacher Strat-Talk Supporter

    May 28, 2012
    California
    And that's why getting your S+++ together before a gig is so important!
     
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  9. davidKOS

    davidKOS Musician, Composer, Teacher Strat-Talk Supporter

    May 28, 2012
    California
    First, you can use the same chord pattern and write a new melody. It's your tune, as chord changes cannot be copyrighted.

    So all you need is a new melody. Technically this is called a "contrafacta". A new melody written to a existing chord pattern.
     
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  10. fezz parka

    fezz parka On...for Omar. Strat-Talk Supporter

    Apr 21, 2011
    Undisclosed.
    For some....maybe. ;)
    One chord progression, two melodies. I could have played Still Got The Blues, and I Will Survive too. Melodies suggest chord progressions, chord progressions suggest melodies. It's all related.

     
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  11. Omar

    Omar Most Inquisitive Junior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

    Aug 9, 2017
    Marbella, Spain
    Melody is the head we are practicing, right? vocals/lyrics defines new melody.
     
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  12. Cerb

    Cerb Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    38
    Jan 22, 2016
    Sweden
    Yes, for me.
     
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  13. fezz parka

    fezz parka On...for Omar. Strat-Talk Supporter

    Apr 21, 2011
    Undisclosed.
    No, a new melody defines a new melody. :)
     
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  14. dogletnoir

    dogletnoir Most Honored Senior Member

    Nov 1, 2013
    northeastern usa
    Change the melody, and especially, change the rhythmic emphasis.


    Same chord progression, two radically different tunes.
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2018
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  15. Omar

    Omar Most Inquisitive Junior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

    Aug 9, 2017
    Marbella, Spain
    First off, I’d like to express my sincere apologies for this less than basic solo. I’d become a decent guitar player, but I’d never become a good soloist :(

    I messed up in the last head before coda. I’ve failed to hide it behind randomly picked notes :D

     
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  16. Omar

    Omar Most Inquisitive Junior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

    Aug 9, 2017
    Marbella, Spain
    I understand. Thank you E for the example. It made it clear :)
     
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  17. davidKOS

    davidKOS Musician, Composer, Teacher Strat-Talk Supporter

    May 28, 2012
    California
    As in the minute you start soloing - unless you paraphrase the song melody, it's a new one.
    That's why a jazz improviser is a bit of a composer.
     
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  18. davidKOS

    davidKOS Musician, Composer, Teacher Strat-Talk Supporter

    May 28, 2012
    California
    Specifically the melody of the tune itself is the "head". That's what a singer would sing for example.
     
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  19. davidKOS

    davidKOS Musician, Composer, Teacher Strat-Talk Supporter

    May 28, 2012
    California
    OK , head cool...

    solos - Actually you are on the verge of really hearing something cool - you have the melody in your head for sure, and are getting the chords under the fingers.

    OK, it's not a jazz solo that guys are going to imortalize (nor are some of mine), but it's a very good effort and shows that you are getting the essential lesson material.

    There were a very few places you were not really fluent, but that will soon come together, you are really getting the idea!:thumb:

    Next time, whenever that will be, crescent moons and all, try completing the tune with the last head.

    great work.
     
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  20. fezz parka

    fezz parka On...for Omar. Strat-Talk Supporter

    Apr 21, 2011
    Undisclosed.
    Everything David said. And this guy digs it too.

     
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