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Relative sizes of planets and stars

Discussion in 'Sidewinders Bar & Grille' started by CalicoSkies, Aug 8, 2018.

  1. CalicoSkies

    CalicoSkies Senior Stratmaster

    Jun 10, 2013
    Hillsboro, OR, USA
    I've always been a bit interested in what else is out in the universe (and whether we'll find if there's life elsewhere in the universe or not). I've seen comparisons of planets & stars many times before, but I still find it mind-boggling about the size of other planets and stars out there compared to others, and that it seems there's always something bigger and bigger out there..
    https://www.slideshare.net/woodchurchscience/relative-sizes-of-planets-and-stars

    I've copied a couple of the images here, but there are more on that link:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    As a side note, a while ago I heard that NASA published a recording of some sounds sent back from around Jupiter by one of the explorers they have out there:

    I've wondered how they got these sounds, since I heard they're from magnetic fields around Jupiter.. But at any rate, there is some more information on those sounds here:
    https://www.cnet.com/news/nasa-juno-jupiter-ionosphere-sounds-plasma-spectrogram/
     

  2. Grux

    Grux Strat-Talker

    Age:
    38
    337
    May 17, 2018
    Clarksville, TN
    Yeah, I like astronomy too and my wife makes fun of me for it but she married me so...in her face! I think its awesome and wierd/strange feeling to know how relatively small we are in the universe. Jupiter seems so huge its unreal compared to earth but you have to remember earth is rocky and dense, those big GAS planets are just big expanding Gasballs.
     

  3. CalicoSkies

    CalicoSkies Senior Stratmaster

    Jun 10, 2013
    Hillsboro, OR, USA
    I agree. Jupiter seems to be so huge, but there are other things that are still much larger than Jupiter.
     
    Boognish likes this.

  4. Grux

    Grux Strat-Talker

    Age:
    38
    337
    May 17, 2018
    Clarksville, TN
    Yep, that's why I think its important to really contemplate just how much we really matter in the universe. We're smaller than a microscopic piece of an atom lol....crazy stuff
     

  5. Grux

    Grux Strat-Talker

    Age:
    38
    337
    May 17, 2018
    Clarksville, TN
    18myou0kz7ujejpg.jpg What I really want to see is the that big giant space turtle we supposedly live on according to flat earthers.....that'd really be something.
     

  6. Nubs

    Nubs Strat-Talker

    226
    Aug 29, 2015
    Houston, TX
    There's no way we're the only life form in the entire known universe.

    NO WAY.
     

  7. Grux

    Grux Strat-Talker

    Age:
    38
    337
    May 17, 2018
    Clarksville, TN
    So far so good lol
     
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  8. CalicoSkies

    CalicoSkies Senior Stratmaster

    Jun 10, 2013
    Hillsboro, OR, USA
    [​IMG]
     

  9. lonegroover

    lonegroover Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    58
    Mar 5, 2016
    England
    What fascinates me most is the relative distances. I worked out the following a few years ago:


    Imagine the Earth has a 12 mm diameter, about the size of a marble. On this scale the Moon is about 38cm (15 inches) away, a small sphere about 3mm in diameter.

    The Sun would be a bright ball of light about 1.39 metres (about 4.5 ft) in diameter, about 150 metres (164 yards) away.

    The nearest star not counting the Sun (Alpha Centauri) would be roughly 9460km away, a distance of about 5878 miles.

    So if you had a model of the Solar System in a park in Kansas, with the Sun 150 metres from your little half-inch Earth, you could place Alpha Centauri somewhere across the pacific in Japan (a sphere about 5.5 feet in diameter).
     
    Bowmap, Nadnitram, thxphotog and 10 others like this.

  10. stratman323

    stratman323 Dr. Stratster Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    58
    Apr 21, 2010
    London, UK
    I was hugely into astronomy when I was a lad, so the moon landing when I was 9 was fascinating for me.

    One thing that does surprise me though is the number of people who still refer to Pluto as a planet some ten or twelve years after it was relegated from that status.
     
    Mansonienne and Grux like this.

  11. rocknrollrich

    rocknrollrich Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    47
    Jan 8, 2016
    philadelphia
    I watch a lot of science channel. "How the universe works" and shows like that.
    But i learned everything i needed to know from this video.
     
    GoldenEagle0308 likes this.

  12. CalicoSkies

    CalicoSkies Senior Stratmaster

    Jun 10, 2013
    Hillsboro, OR, USA
    I find that interesting too. And not too long ago, I heard about the planets that were discovered in the Trappist system, that are much closer together than the planets in our solar system.

    I thought it was just a few years ago when they changed Pluto's status.. I guess time goes by fast. I have heard people joke about its status being changed, and what constitutes a "planet"..
     
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  13. lonegroover

    lonegroover Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    58
    Mar 5, 2016
    England
    About three years ago an 'Earth-like' planet was discovered orbiting a star that's 320 times further away from us than Alpha Centauri is. So even on the scale in which the Earth is a marble and the Sun is about the size of a small car 164 yards away, it would be 1.8 million miles away.
     

  14. bsman

    bsman Strat-Talk Member

    20
    Mar 4, 2014
    Santa Clara

    “Out here in the perimeter there are no stars. Out here we is stoned, immaculate”
     

  15. CalicoSkies

    CalicoSkies Senior Stratmaster

    Jun 10, 2013
    Hillsboro, OR, USA
    I agree. The universe is just too huge, and there are many stars and galaxies in it. If life developed on our planet, surely there may be other planets where the conditions are right and where life has developed.

    Generally I don't believe conspiracy theories, but I always wonder about all the UFO sightings and stories I've heard about where people have seen UFOs and have been supposedly abducted by aliens.. One interesting case was (I've heard) the first known UFO abduction case, of Betty and Barney Hill. It happened in the early 1960s, and to make a long story short, Betty Hill asked where they were from and the aliens showed her a star chart. The star chart was not known at the time, and only later it was discovered to be the Zeta Reticuli system. Our astronomers did not discover that system until years later, yet Betty Hill's drawing of what she remembered matched the Zeta Reticuli system. I don't think this story has been debunked.

    Another interesting story is the abduction of Travis Walton in 1975 (made famous by the movie 'Fire In The Sky'). He was missing for several days, and he said he was taken aboard a UFO (his actual description of what happened is more interesting than what they showed in the movie, IMO). I don't think his story has been debunked either. Also, while he was missing, there was a police investigation and they were treating it as a possible murder case, but their investigation was inconclusive, and of course, Travis Walton returned and was alive.
     

  16. Monkeyboy

    Monkeyboy Dr. Stratster Strat-Talk Supporter

    You are correct! Why, upon further examination, there are many more life forms right here on this very Earth :eek:
     

  17. Monkeyboy

    Monkeyboy Dr. Stratster Strat-Talk Supporter

    And the Sun, at about 865,000 mi in dia. (if ancient memory serves) is over 3 x as wide as the mean distance between Earth and Moon. And it's not even a big star .
     

  18. Monkeyboy

    Monkeyboy Dr. Stratster Strat-Talk Supporter

    Check out Sirius B, alien amphibians, the Dogon Tribe, if you haven't already :thumb:
     
    CalicoSkies likes this.

  19. Monkeyboy

    Monkeyboy Dr. Stratster Strat-Talk Supporter

    I hate that show. I never warmed up to the Dirty Jobs guy talking 3rd grade astrophysics to me :whistling:
    But I'm glad it's there for others .