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Relative sizes of planets and stars

Discussion in 'Sidewinders Bar & Grille' started by CalicoSkies, Aug 8, 2018.

  1. Nadnitram

    Nadnitram Senior Stratmaster

    Jul 18, 2017
    The Heartland
    I'm not sure it would be certain death for planet Earth. In this scenario, Earth would have to be a moon orbiting Saturn. Saturn has moons much closer -- Mimas (185,000 KM) is twice as close to Saturn than we are to our moon (384,000 KM).

    Now, the impact that distance would have on living conditions on Earth is entirely different thing ... altogether.
     
  2. stratman323

    stratman323 Dr. Stratster Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    58
    Apr 21, 2010
    London, UK
    OK, I see your point.
     
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  3. Monkeyboy

    Monkeyboy Dr. Stratster Strat-Talk Supporter

    May 23, 2015
    Nowhere, man ...
    Lots of problems there, yeah. :cool:
     
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  4. Monkeyboy

    Monkeyboy Dr. Stratster Strat-Talk Supporter

    May 23, 2015
    Nowhere, man ...
    Again with the Bohm "Reality is inexhaustible , and so is always something more than what we say it is, and something different".
    I'd say that we could apply that to the life right here on Earth, and Earth itself for that matter (and 'Life, the Universe, and Everything', for that matter :thumb:;)). I see certain other species as being rather intelligent , and also that the creative "intelligence" that seems built into the processes that operate to generate and elaborate life here , would be expected to operate "the same way" in innumerable compatible environments across the universe. That seems like a given, so we go on to all the usual discussions about exobiology . I just can't see it not happening . A lot. Something more, and something different, if not all over the place, then in a lot of places . Then we have the whole other kettle of fish about a totality or wholeness of which this observable universe is just ...not vey much :whistling:
     
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  5. Nadnitram

    Nadnitram Senior Stratmaster

    Jul 18, 2017
    The Heartland
    Me trying to understand astronomy is like an ant in Ohio trying to understand the concept of Hawaii. But it's still one of my favorite topics.
     
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  6. stratman323

    stratman323 Dr. Stratster Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    58
    Apr 21, 2010
    London, UK
    Is Hawaii a concept?
     
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  7. Nadnitram

    Nadnitram Senior Stratmaster

    Jul 18, 2017
    The Heartland
    Infrared light exists, even if I can't see it (without help). High pitched sound exists, even if I can't hear it. It took us millennia to devise instruments to measure either of those. What else exists in our world that we can't sense? ...yet?

    Remember the climax of Silence of the Lambs, where Buffalo Bill is using the infrared goggles? Clarice couldn't see him, but he could see her.



    Haha! Never having been there, I'd say yes. To me it is.
     
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  8. Monkeyboy

    Monkeyboy Dr. Stratster Strat-Talk Supporter

    May 23, 2015
    Nowhere, man ...
    Yeah, we think we have things figured out until we figure out that we don't o_O
     
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  9. dirocyn

    dirocyn Strat-O-Master

    Age:
    43
    631
    Jan 20, 2018
    Murfreesboro, TN
    Yes, it's a real pet peeve for me. And also when they fail to distinguish between a theory and a hypothesis. Or when they present a wild harebrained hypothesis (i.e., dark energy or ancient aliens) as though it is equal to known and accepted theories (germ theory, genetic selection, gravity).

    The dark energy hypothesis notes that galaxies further away are moving away from us faster than galaxies that are closer. So there must be some HUGE force pushing them apart, causing the galaxies that are furthest out to accelerate. But we don't know what it is so we'll call it dark energy, and it happens to be the largest physical force in the whole universe, and if the acceleration continues these galaxies will get so far away and going so fast that their light never reaches us and the whole universe goes dark. This as explained by Neil deGrasse Tyson, no less. Okay, right. We see the further away ones are moving faster, that's not the same thing as seeing them accelerate away in real time. So...why would we ever think every particle to come out of the big bang was going the same speed in the first place? The actual Big Bang Theory (based on Edwin Hubble's observation that galaxies are moving apart) does not actually state that the bang was neat and clean and homogeneous with every particle the same size and going the same speed. Why would we think it would be that way? That's not explosions look like on Earth, and it's not what novas and supernovas do. Explosions are messy and they are fast but not instantaneous. Bits in the middle bang into the bits further out that haven't exploded yet, some losing momentum and others punching through, some getting pushed back and forth as the explosion continues around them. OF COURSE the bits that were going faster in the beginning are still going faster today, that's how momentum in a vacuum is generally understood to work. It shouldn't be a surprise that the bits further away are moving faster, that's how they got further away. No rewriting the laws of physics, no new unseen force larger than all the other forces in the universe is required. Distant galaxies are not going to accelerate beyond the speed of light, and the Universe is not going to go dark because of it. I'll take my Nobel Prize now, please.
     
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  10. CalicoSkies

    CalicoSkies Senior Stratmaster

    Jun 10, 2013
    Hillsboro, OR, USA
    Of course it's nonsense in that way, but it's interesting to think of what the planets would look like if they were that close to the earth.
     
  11. CalicoSkies

    CalicoSkies Senior Stratmaster

    Jun 10, 2013
    Hillsboro, OR, USA
    I've read a bit about string theory and some theories where scientists think there may be more than the 3 spacial dimensions that we typically understand, in order to explain some phenomena in the universe. It's interesting to think about what might be there that we can't perceive. I read a couple books by Michio Kaku where he talks about string theory and other things - "Hyperspace", and "Parallel Worlds", both interesting books if you're interested in that.
     
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  12. Mr. Lumbergh

    Mr. Lumbergh needs you to go ahead and come in on Sunday, too. Strat-Talk Supporter

    Jan 10, 2014
    Initech, Inc.
    Yeah, Saturn and Jupiter both have very powerful magnetic fields, so if we were too close the radiation would be too high. I know Io around Jupiter gets nuked pretty badly but I think Ganymede is far enough out to be safe from that.
     
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  13. circles

    circles Most Honored Senior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

    Parallel worlds can make for great stories





    Also, paragraph breaks are your friend! :thumb:
     
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  14. Monkeyboy

    Monkeyboy Dr. Stratster Strat-Talk Supporter

    May 23, 2015
    Nowhere, man ...
    I don't understand a lot of that stuff. I remember going "huh ?" for most of Hyperspace.
    My favorite recent book (from 1980) is 'Wholeness and the Implicate Order' (David Bohm).
    It's even more of a head scratcher is some ways , but the parts that I am able to digest
    are as important as anything I've read.
     
  15. Mr. Lumbergh

    Mr. Lumbergh needs you to go ahead and come in on Sunday, too. Strat-Talk Supporter

    Jan 10, 2014
    Initech, Inc.
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  16. sssstratsss

    sssstratsss Strat-Talker

    Age:
    26
    190
    Dec 6, 2017
    Shreveport, Louisiana
    Do any of you guys watch the Joe Rogan Podcasts? He had Neil DeGrasse Tyson the other day. He blew my mind when he said if the earth was the size of a q ball, it would be the smoothest q ball ever machined.
     
  17. Mr. Lumbergh

    Mr. Lumbergh needs you to go ahead and come in on Sunday, too. Strat-Talk Supporter

    Jan 10, 2014
    Initech, Inc.
    I do like Rogan but I generally miss it live.
    If he had Neil Tyson on, I definitely need to check that one out.
     
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  18. circles

    circles Most Honored Senior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

  19. CalicoSkies

    CalicoSkies Senior Stratmaster

    Jun 10, 2013
    Hillsboro, OR, USA
    I wonder how accurate those are. I thought I heard multiple Earths could fit into the eye of Jupiter's storm, but from what it looks like there, it looks like Earth could fit maybe once?