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Strat Reincarnation

Discussion in 'DIY Strat Forum' started by Dirt1977, Mar 23, 2019.

  1. Dirt1977

    Dirt1977 Strat-Talk Member

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    Hi Guys n Gals
    As you were so helpful before im back for more HELP!!!

    Ive decided to try and re-spray a 1996 American Standard Strat to Olympic white as it has a worn maple neck and id really LOVE to emulate The Hendrix Woodstock look.

    Ive heat gunned the Poly off and the guitar has quite a bit of damage (see pics). Ive tried and tried to find you tube videos of the exact process to here on right up to putting the guitar back together, but im struggling.

    Im really grateful if you guys could help.

    Im looking for:

    Filler details and how you would repair the damage then sand.
    Sanding paper grits and order of process
    What sprays to use and what order
    Any youtube vids would be great too.

    I understand its a lengthy process but i enjoy it

    I need sone Villanova Junction in my life

    Thanks
    Lee
     

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  2. Believer7713

    Believer7713 Senior Stratmaster Silver Member

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    Let's start with a couple questions. First, do you have a plan for this build? If so, what would you like to see as the end product? Secondly, do you want to go back with active electronics? I ask so I know what to tell you about the battery boat hole.
    As far as the rest of the damage goes, there are several ways to repair it. You could use epoxy, fiberglass and resin like in auto body or you could cut it out and fill it in then shave and sand to match the contours.
    If it were mine, I would repair the flat surfaces with a coat of fiberglass resin. You can get really smooth with it. I just finished a build where I filled in a pickup route with a block of wood then used some Quick Wood epoxy putty. After it dried I skim coated it with body filler to make it completely smooth.
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    The QuikWood works really well because you can mold and shape it as well as work it like wood.
    No matter what you use just take your time and make sure everything has cured before moving to the next step. Otherwise you will be chasing problems all the way through.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
     
  3. Dirt1977

    Dirt1977 Strat-Talk Member

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    Thanks for the great response.
    Yeah im looking to wire back up as it was, 3 single coil fat 50s and i hadnt used the battery boat hole so i wont again. This Strat was originally a HHS but i have a standard pick guard and standard wiring.
    Thanks for the amazing advice.

     

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  4. garyhoos1

    garyhoos1 Huffing n Puffing. Strat-Talk Supporter

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    I would like to help with advice on paint but i am the worst finisher, take your time, nitro and oly white is awesome.

    Good luck :thumb:
     
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  5. Dirt1977

    Dirt1977 Strat-Talk Member

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    Thanks
    Yeah , its one of my guitars so im learning and not messing a customers guitar up. Ive heard this stage is the most important

    Cheers

     
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  6. garyhoos1

    garyhoos1 Huffing n Puffing. Strat-Talk Supporter

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  7. Believer7713

    Believer7713 Senior Stratmaster Silver Member

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    Yes it is. I would fill that may gouge in the upper bout with the JB WELD KwikWood. It is made specifically for those kinds of repairs and like I said earlier it will take paint well. It comes in a tube and is a putty type epoxy that you knead together in your hands. Don't be afraid to apply it liberally and make it blister up well inst the surface of the rest of the body... it will sand off smooth. Also wait several days if not a week for it to fully cure before sanding it as it will shrink some as it dries and cures.
    Like I said, patients is key. It's is also the hardest ingredient.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
     
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  8. Dirt1977

    Dirt1977 Strat-Talk Member

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  9. Dirt1977

    Dirt1977 Strat-Talk Member

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    Ok, so, i understand the weld putty process and how to do it but i dont know what you do with the fibreglass resin for the flat damaged parts. Im unable to find any youtube videos and do not know how this works. Could you please explain or link a video. Is it liquid?
    Do i sand the guitar before i do all of the above with 400 or......?
    Sorry, i appreciate your help



     
  10. Believer7713

    Believer7713 Senior Stratmaster Silver Member

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    Look up either body filler or bondo. It works well for smoothing out rough scrapes before painting.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
     
  11. Dirt1977

    Dirt1977 Strat-Talk Member

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    Could someone kindly guide me through the fixing of my guitar body..

    Sand 1st?
    What paper ? 400?
    Then putty ?
    When would i use resin

    Im still not clear

    Many thanks
     
  12. vid1900

    vid1900 Senior Stratmaster

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    Feathering out all those gouge repairs so they don't telegraph through the finish in a few months is going to be the ass kicker.

    I'd gently suggest you get a brand new Fender body in Olympic White for $199

    http://rover.ebay.com/rover/1/711-5...0001&campid=5338148356&icep_item=143163065117


    You could easily put 6 hours of labor into that old body, $50 in nitro and sealer, and still be very disappointed if you can see the patches once the wood expands and contracts a few months.
     
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  13. Seamus OReally

    Seamus OReally Strat-Talker Silver Member

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    Roger that. That body is a wreck, and I think six hours of labor is a very conservative estimate, especially since the OP is asking questions about what grit to use and how the resin works. You could put 12 or more hours into sanding and filling and sanding, and still end up with a finish that shows all the flaws. If it were me, I'd hold my nose and buy a new one.
     
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  14. vid1900

    vid1900 Senior Stratmaster

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    Sure, and of course, somebody will pay $50 for that chewed up body, so ~$150 for a factory finish and being able to put the guitar back together in a hour - priceless
     
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  15. jvin248

    jvin248 Senior Stratmaster

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    .

    Try the filler, Sand with 80-100 grit and use a block to keep it level when sanding. Then 200 followed by 350. Going higher than 350 won't gain much but you can try if you are having fun sanding.

    You might buy a Walmart $16 random orbital sander, or whatever similar store you have with cheap hand sanders, though get a random orbital. I had my old quarter-sheet sander from the 80s give out on me and I got one of these and I should have gotten an orbital years ago. It is just fantastic.

    Go to the hardware store and get a rattle can of Antique White or whatever is closest to the Oly. Rustoleum 2X worked for a few people on this forum (you can do some searches on 2X Rustoleum and probably find them -- and read the full technique). Rustoleum satin or gloss clear coat for the finish layer.

    I wouldn't spend a lot on the paint, don't worry about 'nitro'. Just get some paint. It is quite likely painting techniques will override paint type -- you're going to paint this guitar now, find things you don't like over a few months, and repaint. That's the way it goes.

    Or ... you take a life on the relic side, it's fun and carefree.

    [​IMG]



    .
     
  16. Miotch

    Miotch Senior Stratmaster

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    While I love a project, I also don't see this one being fiscally rewarding. Better to buy an unfinished or pre-finished body if you want to guarantee it will look like you want it to. Yes, you can do this. But yes it will also take hours and hours of work. Anytime I estimate something will take four hours, by the time I'm done, it is triple my estimate. And there are so many steps that can go wrong. Even with a perfectly good body, I've had to stop, strip and restart the finish process many times when something goes south on me.

    I'd start it and see what you think. If it becomes clear early it may not turn out like you want, don't be afraid to bail. It's OK sometimes. I'd use polyester Bondo to start with.
     
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  17. vid1900

    vid1900 Senior Stratmaster

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    Don't forget that if you use standard spray paint, it will probably take 6 weeks to harden enough to buff out.

    If you sand in the body cavity, and it gums up the sandpaper, give it another 2 weeks.
     
  18. Dirt1977

    Dirt1977 Strat-Talk Member

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    Great advice guys. Thank you for all your input.
    Its a learning curve for me so i may try to repair it 1st before, eventually buying another body. Its all about the experience anyhow.

    Appreciate your time
     
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  19. Believer7713

    Believer7713 Senior Stratmaster Silver Member

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    Another thing to take into consideration is that you are wanting to spray it white. Although it won't hide every imperfection it is very forgiving if you don't have all of your prep work 100%. Unlike Black or any dark color which will accentuate anything that isn't spot on. Just something to think about if you are really wanting to take this project on.
    I am not trying to discourage you in any way bud, but now that I can see this body on a bigger screen than my phone it is rough but there is a LOT of work to be done. Start with probably 100 grit sandpaper to get the rough edges feathered in. Then I would start with the filling. Your options are pretty open here. You can use the epoxy or bondo. Just know that with this much material there will be signs of the repairs in the future because the wood is organic and will never stop moving whereas the fillers will try to stay stable.
    With all of that said, if you still want a go at it to learn then I would start with the hole for the battery boat. Cut a piece of wood to fit the hole and glue it in place with wood glue. I like to use Titebond III because it dries quickly and holds really well. but any of the Titebond glues will fork for this application as would Gorilla wood glue. Don't be afraid to let the glue squeeze out and fill the cracks and also you can cut the plug to stick out of the hole a bit so that you can sand it down to be level with the rest of the body. I would wait until the next day before sanding it though to make sure the glue is not only dry to the touch but dried through so there wou't be any shrinkage after sanding.
    When you fill the rest make sure that you overfill them with whatever you are using so that you can sand it smooth and flush. I like to wait a couple days to make sure that it has completely cured and settled in before sanding. The less filling you have to do the better but sometimes you will have to do it in layers as it can be more stable that way, kind of like how plywood gets it's strength. When sanding be sure to use a block that spans the distance of the area you are sanding and learn to roll the block around outside radii. For an inside radius use a cylindrical block, like a dowel rod or piece of broom handle and make sure it's long enough to span the surface again. this will insure that your "repair" will be even (flush) with the area around it and it will be blended. Also, when sanding don't be afraid to stop short of where you think it needs to be and go to the next finer grit and move the material more slowly so you don't end up going too far then having to go back and repair your repair.
    I could go on and on but for now this is where I will stop. Just remember that patience is key for a project like this. So, if you are really looking to learn then have a go at it. If you are looking for a quick fix then I would recommend what some of the others have with the idea of a different body.
     
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