Amplified Parts Lollar Pickups

Amplified Parts Lollar Pickups

Amplified Parts Lollar Pickups Guitar Pickups

Think it will hold?

Discussion in 'Tech-Talk' started by tschucha, Oct 5, 2018.

  1. tschucha

    tschucha Strat-Talker

    469
    Aug 13, 2014
    Oregon
    back1.jpg body.JPG front1.jpg I bought this Indonesian, probably 80s or 90s strat knockoff for $12. It has a nice sunburst finish and a thin body like a Squier Affinity. Body is solid wood probably a cheap mahogany of some sort. Here's the problem. The previous owner apparently dive bombed the strings so hard that the wood cracked where the 6 bridge screws attach the bridge to the body. With the strings under tension the wood lifts up. There are two serious cracks, one on either side of the 6 bridge screws. The guitar is going to end up as one of 2 things, either a cheap player or a very pretty wall ornament. Needless to say I'm hoping it will end up being playable.

    My (hopefully) fix? Got some low viscosity Titebond wood glue and flooded the cracks on the top and inside the guitar. The Titebond really did flow into the cracks well. Regular superglue was too thick to do much more than the surface. Anyway I put a goodly bit of the Titebond into the cracks and pressed everything together. It was probably set within 30 seconds or so but I'm not going to test it till tomorrow. Now I know that the 'proper' fix for this would have involved a decent bit of woodworking skills, dowels and equipment that I do not have.

    So guys what do you think? Will the Titebond hold or do I have a $12 Wall hanging?
     
  2. Bowmap

    Bowmap For vets that help keep us safe & free, Thank You! Gold Member

    950
    Dec 23, 2017
    NVL
    Titebond I, II or III? In my woodworking I use Titebond III (green label). When properly applied it is stronger than the wood. But that usually means clamping pieces together over night. I have not tried your method of application. So I question if 30 seconds will allow proper bonding. That is a tough place to get any clamping pressure on to without making a special jig. If anything, you will get experience no matter the outcome.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2018
  3. tschucha

    tschucha Strat-Talker

    469
    Aug 13, 2014
    Oregon
    I used Titebond CA Instant Bond. Says 7 second handling, 5 second set. Soaks End grains to prevent Splitting. Designed to fill knots and voids.
     
  4. Bodean

    Bodean Rock N Roll Ain't Noise Pollution Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    51
    Aug 23, 2014
    South Carolina
    Did the cracks go into the pickup cavity?
     
  5. tschucha

    tschucha Strat-Talker

    469
    Aug 13, 2014
    Oregon
    Not on the surface. When the strings were put on and the guitar tuned up the wood lifted but did not pull off. It stayed perpendicular to the tremolo block. It didn't appear to go up into the pickup cavity. I suspect that if it did I could have pulled the chunk of wood out. It came up but did not come out.
    Now going down it obviously cracked down onto the spring cavity. The cracks had to start near the tremolo block and pull upwards and inwards towards the pickup cavity but did not get all the way there.
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2018
  6. Bowmap

    Bowmap For vets that help keep us safe & free, Thank You! Gold Member

    950
    Dec 23, 2017
    NVL
    CA glues are a different animal. There are available of several thicknesses. From gel to as thin as water. CAs would change the clamping time, a lot, he he. I have use CA glues to bond wood to brass and put a hard finish on some of the pens I make.
     
  7. tschucha

    tschucha Strat-Talker

    469
    Aug 13, 2014
    Oregon
    Thinking back to my old high school physics class....... the angle of the dangle is inversely proportional to the mass of the ass. If we take that into consideration with the heat of the meat it would seem that as long as I can get the wood to hold somewhat steady I could block the damn thing and the wood would not be able to move enough to re-crack therefore giving a perfectly playable guitar. IIRC Eric Clapton's Brownie had 5 springs and was decked. Didn't he also block his guitars sometimes?
     
    Believer7713 likes this.
  8. ZlurkCorzDog

    ZlurkCorzDog A Real Nowhere Man Strat-Talk Supporter

    Jan 20, 2012
    Not On Cloud 9
  9. tschucha

    tschucha Strat-Talker

    469
    Aug 13, 2014
    Oregon
    I love the irony of that. Let's ask a guy who builds $2500 Super Custom strats for an opinion on repairing a $12 cheap strat knockoff!

    Heck - My hourly rate is ZERO as I'm retired and just doing stuff like this to learn and have fun. But come to think of it. my playing could be better. You think that @EricClapton could give me some pointers?
     
    Bob the builder likes this.
  10. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    72
    May 26, 2006
    Jacksonville, FL
    that is a structural fault... simply allowing glue to "wick" into the crack will not be 100% sound ... However for a DIY repair, it would probably be OK..

    use thin CA and allow it to wick in, immediately following that with a medium viscosity CA... the thin will "pull" the thicker CA into the crack facilitating a more secure repair...

    DO NOT DIVE-BOMB on that guitar ever again..


    r
     
  11. Triple Jim

    Triple Jim Senior Stratmaster

    Feb 27, 2018
    North Central NC
    Now let's see if Clapton will offer some playing tips. :)
     
    Bob the builder likes this.
  12. tschucha

    tschucha Strat-Talker

    469
    Aug 13, 2014
    Oregon

    Thanks Ron!
     
  13. Bob the builder

    Bob the builder Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    58
    May 2, 2016
    Cranston, Rhode Island
    And the cool thing...he's happy to help you. The people here are great.
     
    ZlurkCorzDog and tschucha like this.
  14. Bowmap

    Bowmap For vets that help keep us safe & free, Thank You! Gold Member

    950
    Dec 23, 2017
    NVL
    That is a neat trick. Let the thin CA pull in a thicker CA. Another little nice tidbit to file away in the back of my head. Dang it is getting crowded back there.
     
    jrbirdman likes this.
  15. tschucha

    tschucha Strat-Talker

    469
    Aug 13, 2014
    Oregon
    You are spot on with that comment. The greatest thing about this forum is that the people here all love strats and do pretty much everything imaginable to them, even playing them AND share their knowledge. Being here and reading about the various experiences people have has not only been enjoyable but has given me the knowledge to do much, much more with guitars, including playing better.

    When I was younger I could play pretty well but didn't know (or care) much about the actual instrument itself. I raised the pickups as high as I could to make the guitar louder and lowered the strings until they just barely buzzed. That was it. Didn't know why the saddles weren't just straight like on an acoustic guitar or what those springs and the claw was in the back. Didn't know nuttin' and didn't care. It's great to be older and broaden the horizons.
     
    Bob the builder likes this.
  16. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    72
    May 26, 2006
    Jacksonville, FL
    Yeah, yeah, yeah... I gotcha all fooled... actually I'm a conniving evil skank.. trying to get ya all into working on guitars.. that way ya stop spending the evenings watching that gawddawfull didactic Network TV and start spending time all alone, just YOU, a great Cigar, a dram of a fine scotch tinkering with your guitar in the garage.... and, AND, . . . get this, . . . it forces ya to save money cause ya don' t have to run off to your favorite tech every few days.... Nyaaaah...

    AM I a warped essobee or what? :D
     
  17. tschucha

    tschucha Strat-Talker

    469
    Aug 13, 2014
    Oregon
    Thank you peoples. I just screwed everything together, restrung it and tuned it up. No unGodly cracking sounds :) I've blocked the bridge with quarters to add a little help to the repairs but did tune it up to pitch prior to blocking. I'm pretty sure that this guitar is actually going to be useable. I still need to fine tune the pickup heights, string heights and intonate the thing but none of this should have much effect on the repair. I played it for 10 minutes or so and did a number of bends - NO TREMOLO though! Thank you all for your input and help.

    Here is what may be a tip for you all. With the 6 screws holding the bridge to the guitar they MUST be loose enough that the bridge can pivot. It occurred to me that when I got the guitar the screws were tightened all the way down. My guess is that the original owner did this and then tried to do a dive bomb. If this is what happened the tremolo mechanism acted as a lever and pried the wood up. That would explain how the cracks looked. Don't know for sure but it would explain things.

    $12 garage sale guitar and a bit of work - seems like I'm in business. I like this better as a real guitar than a wall decoration! Again thank you folks!
     
    Triple Jim likes this.
  18. jrbirdman

    jrbirdman Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    64
    Feb 3, 2016
    Elk Plain, Wa.
    How many quarters does it take to block the bridge?
     
  19. tschucha

    tschucha Strat-Talker

    469
    Aug 13, 2014
    Oregon

    It took 7 on this one. This is one of those thinner blocks. It would take less on a regular strat and maybe even more depending on how big the cavity was cut. I had heard that it took 5 half dollars but the trem block on this on was bigger near the bridge and a smaller thickness body. the quarters fit in real nicely.

    Ya gotta be creative!