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Training to spray paint

Discussion in 'DIY Strat Forum' started by WIZARD1325, Mar 11, 2019.

  1. WIZARD1325

    WIZARD1325 Strat-Talker

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    Does 1 coat equal 3 passes?

    I thought 1 coat was when you go around the guitar once
     
  2. Bowmap

    Bowmap I Nose A Thang or Two Gold Member

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  3. EAllen

    EAllen Strat-Talk Member

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    In a finisher's world we equate 3 passes to one coat. Those are 3 light passes, not hogging finish on. Hogging on only leads to slower cure times and more runs. A finisher's goal is to evenly apply color to the achieve the desired coverage in a controlled manner. So 3 light passes equals one nice manageable coat.

    Remember, you gain nothing by trying to get a gloss finish on intitial coats except going thru a lot more finish. The only coats that need to be applied to a gloss quantity are the final ones. If you are clear coating over your color then no color coats should be to a gloss level.

    I build and finish multiple guitars each year and when clear coating with nitro for instance, I do 6-8 dry coats before finishing with 2-3 gloss coats.


    Eric
     
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  4. BobbyS

    BobbyS Strat-O-Master

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    back in the day painting autos with lacquer we put on 6 coats of paint. Letting each coat "flash off" ( letting the solvent evaporate) before the next coat. We always put one coat on after the other. sanding between coats is a waste of time, unless you have a run or something you want out. super slick finish is put on an extra coat or two, then when well dry wet color sand it with very fine sandpaper before buffing
     
  5. RobZ69

    RobZ69 Strat-O-Master

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  6. Paperback Rocker

    Paperback Rocker Nitro-mancer Strat-Talk Supporter

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    You don't want to spray it on dry like a previous post recommended.

    Spray thin coats and allow adequate dry time.
     
  7. WIZARD1325

    WIZARD1325 Strat-Talker

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    Dry coats? Meaning the color coats?

     
  8. WIZARD1325

    WIZARD1325 Strat-Talker

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  9. EAllen

    EAllen Strat-Talk Member

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    Light coats will often look dry while heavy coats will look wet. If your coats look wet when applying they are too heavy. Your goal on lacquer color coats and clear is not for gloss until your last 2-3 clear coats.

    Even on a base coat/clear coat 2k system your color is not intended to look glossy until the clear.
     
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  10. CGHguitars

    CGHguitars Strat-O-Master

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    You're right about that. I've finished 8 guitars, and more necks using NC lacquer, and I've drifted from some of the instruction on Reranch's site. I dry sand, rather than wet sand, all the time. I never wait 30 days to sand, and have found that with the right technique, I can sand very quickly, and just save the final polish for later. With clear or tinted lacquer on a neck only, I can have it done and playable in weekend. I've found that Micromesh pads are way better than sandpaper when you get to the final stages, and with some practice, you can get a great, very natural gloss without polishing. My favorite finish is colored lacquer without a clearcoat, sanded and polished to a light, or at the most, a moderate gloss. That looks great, and feels fantastic.

    That said, Finish 101 on their site is the best, most effective starting point. You can adjust as you wish going forward.

    Good luck on your project.
     
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  11. DJGranite

    DJGranite Strat-Talker

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    Yes. It is some of the best advice you have been given in this thread.
    They are under $5 at NAPA, the counter man may or may not know of them, but they are in the book, they just have to look for it.
    It gives you way more control of where you spray, and your finger doesn't get cramped up from pushing the button on the can.
    It is way easier to squeeze the handle.
    Another good tip is to move sideways slowly and evenly, starting to spray just before you reach the body and releasing just after you pass the other side if the body.
    I have done several projects with the spray can handle...
    here is a Guitar I did Re-Ranch style with Re-Ranch paint.
    [​IMG].
    I used The Spray can handle to do this.
    this Gorilla Vanilla, a Re-Ranch color, and tinted clear.
    I was going for an aged white, the tinted clear pushed it over the edge into a kind of yellow as you can see.

    And here is a Motorcycle I used the spray can handle on also.
    [​IMG]

    This was just some Rust-O-Leum semi gloss Black, and some Chrysler Hemi Orange Engine paint. No clear.
    And my hand never hurt from pushing the spray button.

    $5 NAPA
     
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  12. henderman

    henderman Most Honored Senior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

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    i think the only fender you should wet sand is on your car. i cringe at the idea of 1 drop of water getting in somewhere and ruining the finish you just did on a wood project.

    if you are diligent and keep the surface clear of dust super fine dry sanding is no problem.

    i use 1/4" thick strong but flexible foam backed 800, 1000 and 1500 grit paper to remove orange peel before buffing lacquer with tripoli on a towel by hand. i found the sandpaper at wood craft, they are about 5" x 6" and expensive but work perfecto. the cheap ones for under a buck with the super thin wimpy foam do not work good for this purpose but you will be able to do at least a few guitars with just 1 each of the good ones. they were like 3 or 4 buck each but are worth it.

    i make small parts and can sand and polish the lacquer after only a few days of curing. i prefer to wait but have never had a problem with only waiting 2 or 3 days.
     
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  13. WIZARD1325

    WIZARD1325 Strat-Talker

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    I just hope i get the sanding down right.

    Im having issues right now cause of the shallac i sprayed there are shiny parts everywhere. I spent 30m sanding what i could. I thi k im going to spray white nitro primer to see what damage im dealing with and fix from there
     
  14. strat_strummer

    strat_strummer Senior Stratmaster Strat-Talk Supporter

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    Practice, purchase a better quality of paint, let the can sit a sink with hot water for a little bit because spray paint wont bubble up quite so much, and several thin coats is better than a few thick coats.
     
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  15. EAllen

    EAllen Strat-Talk Member

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    I agree with henderman on not letting a drop of water around wood! Nothing but trouble when it expands the wood in a hole and cracks a finish.

    At the same time there is a reason most finishers use a liquid medium for sanding. Many who build, including myself, wet sand with Naptha or Mineral Spirits. They cut faster as well as avoiding the issues water presents with wood. Where you might normally require 800 grit, you can get by with 1000 using those liquids. Naptha tends to be cleaner with less potential oily residue to contaminate the finish.

    The reason for using a liquid medium and cleaning the paper in it frequently is it removes any loose granuales and sanding debri that can scratch your fresh surface.

    Henderman is also correct on using good quality paper. Cheap sand paper can bite you with inconsistent granule sizes that leave scratches out of the blue. You can't go wrong with 3M.

    Eric
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2019
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  16. WIZARD1325

    WIZARD1325 Strat-Talker

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    3m makes everything
     
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  17. RobZ69

    RobZ69 Strat-O-Master

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    At least it helps to prevent a sore finger from pushing the nozzle. And it helps someway towards more even application.

    Edit: see DJGranite's post above.
     
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