Amplified Parts Lollar Pickups

Amplified Parts Lollar Pickups Guitar Pickups

Amplified Parts Lollar Pickups Guitar Pickups

Join Strat-Talk Today

Wood used for strats from 1960 to 1968

Discussion in 'Stratocaster Discussion Forum' started by Guitarman555, Mar 29, 2018.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Wrighty

    Wrighty Senior Stratmaster

    Mar 7, 2013
    Harlow, Essex, UK
    7.5 x 2 = 15. That’d be 2” bigger, would that change the tone?
     

  2. simoncroft

    simoncroft Dr. Stratster Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    61
    May 30, 2013
    SE England
    At the risk of repeating ourselves endlessly, almost every aspect of a musical instrument's design and construction can make some difference to the performance of the instrument. In an electric guitar, it is only to be expected that anything that affects the behaviour of the strings when struck has some impact on the signal output from the pickup.

    However, unless you have played a lot of specimens (and I'm talking hundreds and hundreds), you are likely to make completely erroneous assumptions based on how either one particular instrument performed, or a number of 'influences' on perception that have nothing to do with actual performance parameters. For instance, if I tell you a guitar costs $10,000 and the pickups were hand-wound by the guy who used to make them for [insert name of your favorite guitarist here], I guarantee your brain will work overtime trying to detect all sounds of characteristics that make the guitar 'really special'. It's the same if you take a Tokai and stick a Fender decal on it... but please don't!

    Talk to any brass(wind) player about the tonal differences between metals and you'll soon be struck by the fact that the metals described as having a darker, more rounded tone, also happen to look darker, whereas nickle silver doesn't just sound 'bright', it looks it too. What a coincidence!

    Suffice to say, if you've played only two maple board Teles in your life, and they happened to be on the bright side tonally, you'll confidently state that "maple sounds brighter than rosewood", conveniently forgetting that the only rosewood board Tele you've ever played had a Master of Darkness Deathbucker in the bridge.

    We all do it. For years, I just assumed the neck on a Gibson must be sturdier than those on Fenders because, well that light wood looked a bit flimsy to me... Well that theory worked out.

    I have a seriously expensive Gibson ES335 that was put together using traditional hide glue. When I play it, do I hear vintage glue tone? No, I hear underwhelming jazz chops executed by a blues player! Listen to your Uncle Ron. He knows a thing or two.
     

  3. Ebidis

    Ebidis Providing the world with flat bends since 1985 Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    51
    Nov 14, 2013
    Alabama
    BINGO!
     
    Thrup'ny Bit and Stratoskater like this.

  4. Ebidis

    Ebidis Providing the world with flat bends since 1985 Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    51
    Nov 14, 2013
    Alabama
    I thought:
    Luthier = guy who has adjusted a few truss rods and decides to go into business.

    ;)
     

  5. simoncroft

    simoncroft Dr. Stratster Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    61
    May 30, 2013
    SE England
    Unfortunately, it's often a self-appointed job title, like 'sound engineer', or 'builder' that comes without any external accreditation. On that level, the difference between 'luthier' and 'guitar tech' may be no more than $20 an hour. :sneaky:

    Sadly, any sort of musical instrument repair is a hard route to earning a living. It takes a long time to learn to do well, the investment in tools can be considerable, and it takes its toll on your body (mainly due to the amount of bending over instruments you end up doing). Couple that with the impossibility of refretting a MIM Strat at a price that makes sense to both parties, and you can see the lot of your mainstream musical instrument repair folk is not massively financially rewarding. They'd probably earn more as a plumber, gas engineer, or car mechanic.
     

  6. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    71
    May 26, 2006
    Jacksonville, FL
    Lumber is usually "roughed" to around 7.5 for a piece of that size.. ask of r a 2 x 8 and ya get a piece 1/1/2 x 7 ½...

    and . . after over 50 years.. I'm still hesitant to describe myself as a Luthier... I just make guitars.. nothing too uppity, whoopdy doo about it...

    rk
     
    Stratoskater and Nate D like this.

  7. Nate D

    Nate D Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    37
    Apr 2, 2016
    Ohio
    Yep. I know this and I’m an absolute schlub when it comes to woodworking or carpentry.

    Although, in my ego ideal, I’d be a woodworker extraordinaire. Along with a few other things :)
     

  8. felis

    felis Senior Stratmaster

    Nov 27, 2013
    Antwerp/Belgium
    I know that 'my' Luthier has a master in wood restauration and steelstring, classic guitar qualifications.

    And he proved to be good enough for me. ;)
     

  9. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    71
    May 26, 2006
    Jacksonville, FL
    Yep . I did indeed... but.. unlike many, i have not been resistant to the adventure of learning.... Much at the hands of Bill Lawrence... Were it possible, there's much I'd like to "reclaim"... but say something on the internet, and guys will be bringing it up centuries in the future and be throwing darts too ...

    My personal mantra, when I stop learning, I'll be dead... so I'm planing on learning much more for a long time to come.. Problem with that is: when ya learn something new, it usually means ya were wrong in the past ... One can deny their history, or embrace the new horizons... So as long as I continue being wrong, and correcting myself, I'll still be here annoying my detractors... Oh, welcome to the Ron Kirn Detractors United.. (y'all are united aren't ya?). Y'all seem to constantly bring up the same old Sh** gotta be some coordination there somewhere.. :D

    But since I can be self deprecating .. I thank you for reminding me, and giving me a good chuckle... but, I have moved on, not a bad idea for many.. so for the record, and a correction of anything I have said contradicting it... Glue doesn't mean shi* in an electric guitar.

    OMG!! I just noticed.. New Member.. and from Europe... well . . welcome to the party... put the beer in the 'fridge and plug in.. Just none of that goofy stuff they're playing mainly in Berlin. Worse than Rap..

    And for the record.. I've been wrong in the past.. will almost certainly find I'll be wrong in the future.. but am not ashamed to admit it and correct myself where advised... Remember, to correct yourself, ya gotta still be converting O2 into Co2 . Wood doesn't breathe, but I still do.. ;)

    and since I can readily recognize that.. I'm not afraid to post stuff today that future history may prove wrong... but ya gotta venture forward with the "tools" at your disposal, it's all we have for today. Remember, the guys at Gibson told Lloyd Loar in '29 that no one would ever want or need a guitar with a pickup on it... they changed their mind a year later... :p

    and look . . the universal constant.. the speed of light.. Einstein was wrong... as some theoretical physicists have realized.. so I guess I'm in good company.. it's just he wasn't here long enough to embrace the correction... again, thanks.. I guess I'm doing better than the 'ol patent clerk.

    rk
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2018

  10. Guy Named Sue

    Guy Named Sue Beer me up Scotty Strat-Talk Supporter

    Feb 11, 2015
    Sweden
    While Ron might not be a Monteleone I would think twice before calling him a kit builder. Most of us on this forum who have put together a partcaster including me can call ourselves kit builders and I'm sure that none of us would put ourselves in the same league as Ron.

    Ron is a guitar builder.
     

  11. Guy Named Sue

    Guy Named Sue Beer me up Scotty Strat-Talk Supporter

    Feb 11, 2015
    Sweden
    That's no secret, and how he chooses to build the neck it's between him and his customers. As for the rest of your post I suggest you read my previous post instead of repeating yourself and making a fool out of yourself.:)

    Take care
     

  12. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    71
    May 26, 2006
    Jacksonville, FL
    Sometimes something is said that just bears repeating....

    and as I mentioned . . I have Grandkids. . . so I've have had "discussions" with those not yet "condemned" to reflect back over a half century of experiences ... but... there's one common denominator... there's nothing useful to be gained from such, so I'll just let you have the floor... your entertainment value cannot be bested..

    Heeeeerrrrreeeeee's Wafflein. . . ( will there be a faux golf swing?)

    OMG were you that guy?? making copies of my Templates then reproducing MY instruction booklets to offer with 'em... I haven't sold templates in what must be approaching 10 years now... But if it was you, thanks again.. makes me feel so very wonderful
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2018
    Thrup'ny Bit and Guy Named Sue like this.

  13. Guy Named Sue

    Guy Named Sue Beer me up Scotty Strat-Talk Supporter

    Feb 11, 2015
    Sweden
    You'd think for someone who says they've been around the forum circles you'd know the forum rules when it comes to name calling and trolling.

    NO PERSONAL ATTACKS:
    When someone says something you don't agree with don't turn on them and attack them personally. Don't call people names. Choose to ignore others if their comments are abusive. Otherwise you'll simply start an argument. Turning off your computer and playing your guitar is a great way to deal with contentious issues.
    TROLLING:
    As in trolling for a fight. This is easy to see, but harder to explain. Posting an opposite opinion, in a determined stubborn way simply to start a fight. Here's an example: "What Stratocaster should I buy?" the troll at a Strat forum would respond "Don't buy a Stratocaster they are dumb, buy a Gibson Les Paul instead." Opposite opinions are NOT against the rules and are encouraged, but trolling for disagreement and arguments is against the rules of the page. Other common Troll topics at Strat-Talk have been: "Only Amercian Fenders are any good" "Expensive guitars are stupid," "Squiers ARE/ARE NOT real Fenders," and, of course, "Relics guitars are stupid and so are the guys that play them."
     
    simoncroft likes this.

  14. maqcatt

    maqcatt Strat-Talker

    Age:
    69
    490
    Sep 25, 2008
    silverdale wa
    This guy Wafflein is the obvious fool here.
    Don't respond to a troll and a pr**k.
     
    bassetman likes this.

  15. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    71
    May 26, 2006
    Jacksonville, FL
    I hate to break the bad news to ya.. but eBay was not, and is not a Garage Operation... anything I did had to be run through their Legal review.. Had I been abusing anything, they would have "kicked" me like a bad habit... but, perhaps you've noticed.. I'm still alive and well on eBay ... and still breathing much to your chagrin I suppose... :p

    At least, now we know who you were/are now... Give a man enough rope. . . :rolleyes:

    r
     
    Thrup'ny Bit and Nate D like this.

  16. Mr Dunlop

    Mr Dunlop Senior Stratmaster

    Nov 30, 2014
    usa
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2018
    Paperback Rocker and Nate D like this.

  17. simoncroft

    simoncroft Dr. Stratster Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    61
    May 30, 2013
    SE England
    Even the biggest guitar makers use some outsourced parts. I believe Gibson's Stop Bar used in the Tune-o-Matic assembly is, or was at some time, made in China.

    Most small-scale instrument makers have to outsource a greater number of parts for one simple reason: they can't afford to buy the machines, or employ trained operators all year round. The actual quantity of valves, necks, pickups, drum heads, or whatever they need to complete orders for a whole year can probably delivered in a few days using modern technology. What is a small-scale instrument maker supposed to do with that expensive resource the other 350 days of the year? Leave it idle and send the operators on holiday? Become a supplier of parts to other instrument makers?

    There is no mystery to making a good Fender-style neck. Leo made sure of that. Providing you start with the right materials, and follow the correct engineering specifications, the main variables are in the finishing and set-up, which includes dressing the frets and cutting the nut.

    So, a small-scale operation can either make necks 'the slow way', and undertake many of the building processes by hand, or it can buy in the basic necks and refine them to the customer's requirements. Even Suhr has its necks made off-site, then adds binding, inlays etc in-house.
     
    stratlt and Guy Named Sue like this.

  18. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    71
    May 26, 2006
    Jacksonville, FL
    here's the "ultimate" outsourcing paradox.. Buy a Maserati, a Fiat Chrysler product, and pop the hood.. see that engine.. even though it says Maserati on it.. it's not... You've been scammed.. It's actually made by some skanky little car manufacturer across town in Modena, Italy... normally they paint 'em red.. :D Yep 'fraid so, you thought you were getting a genuine Maserati, but NoooOOooo they stuck a Ferrari engine in it... just imagine...:p and we won't say anything about a Bentley with a BMW engine in it...

    rk
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2018

  19. Bob the builder

    Bob the builder Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    57
    May 2, 2016
    Cranston, Rhode Island
    I think I'd upgrade that to craftsman
     
    Guy Named Sue likes this.

  20. stratman323

    stratman323 Dr. Stratster Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    57
    Apr 21, 2010
    London, UK
    Why can't I see these posts from @Wafflein that other people are quoting?
     

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.