82' Fullerton 'Dad' relic.....is on it's way to the USA

Lateralu_s

Strat-Talker
Dec 22, 2021
272
Spiraling
I have a black 93 Strat that people still mistake for new. I bought it at GC, about 5+ years ago, on the condition that the tech I use and Fender both determine its year and authenticity that it was a '93, and all origional and both confirmed that.

If someone hit that sucker with a sander, It would really be hard not to gouge their eyes out. I know faux aging vs. real aging are personal tastes, and exactly that (it's your money and your guitar, do what you want), but I just don't get it. Never will. It's like buying a mint condition '69 Z28 camaro, beating the crap out of it with a hammer, and hitting a lot of the dents with bondo and some primer, to my imagination.

people do this with cars too lol

the rat rods have been going on for awhile

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Parksie

Senior Stratmaster
Sep 6, 2020
1,105
Sydney
people been doing it for years... started with rust buckets that were hiding a modded small block...

expanded to now every car niche will have something similar to relic'ing there are lots that are poorly done but many that are done well .. with everything there are levels to things

I've never seen it before.......thank god.
 

SpeedKing

Senior Stratmaster
Apr 9, 2015
2,316
UK
I'm very glad the OP is happy with his result as let's be honest his is the only opinion that actually matters here however like others I think I'd have gone for a total refin if I were going to the trouble of shipping it off to experts at that very procedure. To my eyes whilst it undoubtedly looks better it still doesn't look too good.

Is there value in keeping the original 'Fullerton' paint? To some there may be but for me that ship had sailed as soon as 'dad' did his home made relic job on it.

I have to say I'd also break out the shoe polish and steel wool and 'relic' that new mint guard as it looks (again to my eyes at least) all sorts of wrong with that heavy relic effect everywhere else.

Take off the guard, rub it with steel wool and apply shoe polish to certain areas as required. I see both new CS strats and genuine old ones with a noticeably different colour under the strings for example (generally lighter here) and around the screw holes etc. (usually darker to represent dirt and grime trapped in the depressions) which is quite easy to replicate. It's just like using shoe polish to darken 'too light' satin finished maple necks as once applied rubbed in and rubbed off the residue is non sticky and won't transfer onto hands etc but leaves just enough colour to show.... Repeat until you have the tonal pallet required.
 

Parksie

Senior Stratmaster
Sep 6, 2020
1,105
Sydney
I'm very glad the OP is happy with his result as let's be honest his is the only opinion that actually matters here however like others I think I'd have gone for a total refin if I were going to the trouble of shipping it off to experts at that very procedure. To my eyes whilst it undoubtedly looks better it still doesn't look too good.

Is there value in keeping the original 'Fullerton' paint? To some there may be but for me that ship had sailed as soon as 'dad' did his home made relic job on it.

I have to say I'd also break out the shoe polish and steel wool and 'relic' that new mint guard as it looks (again to my eyes at least) all sorts of wrong with that heavy relic effect everywhere else.

Take off the guard, rub it with steel wool and apply shoe polish to certain areas as required. I see both new CS strats and genuine old ones with a noticeably different colour under the strings for example (generally lighter here) and around the screw holes etc. (usually darker to represent dirt and grime trapped in the depressions) which is quite easy to replicate. It's just like using shoe polish to darken 'too light' satin finished maple necks as once applied rubbed in and rubbed off the residue is non sticky and won't transfer onto hands etc but leaves just enough colour to show.... Repeat until you have the tonal pallet required.

I certainly understand your point.

It's worth noting though that it's funny how quickly you get used to something if you see it everyday.

BTW, the guitar is amazing.

It such a difference to my 89' Fiesta red Corona body.

That Fullerton carve (or curve) is really comfortable.

Its lightweight and the neck feels fantastic.
 

slowesthand

Senior Stratmaster
Oct 23, 2011
2,485
NY

Wrighty

Dr. Stratster
Mar 7, 2013
11,892
Harlow, Essex, UK
I hope he doesn’t this as a personal dig but, to my mind, the OP has expended considerable time and expense changing a clearly artificially relic’d Strat into a slightly different looking artificially relic’d Strat, both versions of which still scream ‘artificially relic’d’.
I’d have either saved my money and left it alone or had it properly refinished. JMHO
 

stratman323

Dr. Stratster
Apr 21, 2010
38,608
London, UK
Isn’t the term “artificially relic’d“ a bit redundant? By their nature, all relic-ed guitars are artificially done so

The word is relicked. That's how the English language works I'm afraid - you gotta add that "k" in there. Reliced means it had lice, you got rid of them, & now the lice have come back again. Why would anyone even want a word like that?
 

Mr Dunlop

Senior Stratmaster
Nov 30, 2014
4,214
usa
The word is relicked. That's how the English language works I'm afraid - you gotta add that "k" in there. Reliced means it had lice, you got rid of them, & now the lice have come back again. Why would anyone even want a word like that?

relick - is to lick gain
Relicked would be past tense.
 


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