A Question...

Discussion in 'Pre-CBS Strats (before 1966)' started by rolandson, Oct 19, 2021.

  1. rolandson

    rolandson Dr. Stratster

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    As many are aware, I've a 64 which some enterprising person saw fit to use shielding paint on. Old shielding paint that forms an eletrically conductive dust as it deteriorates, getting into everything it shouldn't.

    In fact, it was the process of seeking advice on removing this crap from my guitar's cavities is what brought me here so many years ago...but I digress...

    I succeeded in removing some of this stuff, but without stripping the interior, I simply couldn't get it all. So, I sealed it with shielding tape and called it a day. Until now...

    I'm putting the guitar on the market and am fully aware that no serious buyer will consider it with that tape in place. So I've removed it. I am now trying to decide...

    ...for the purpose being to prevent this stuff from depositing micro particles of conductive dust into the electronics, would you, as the prospective buyer, prefer I leave it be, or seal the cavities (and only the cavities) with a lite coat of nitrocellulose lacquer?

    This is the beast of which I speak...
    20211019_135610.jpg
     
  2. Cerb

    Cerb Anti conformist reformist

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    I'd sell it as is with full disclosure and leave it to the buyer to decide.
     
  3. Eric_G

    Eric_G Strat-O-Master

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    I'm curious to know why you feel a solid shielding job, clean and made with tape would detract a serious buyer ? To me it seems to be the least intrusive modification....

    Now if I was a buyer, I'd rather you leave it be, this at least give me the option of choosing how I'd like to fix the crap that the previous owner left you with...

    Option i would consider is to reroute the cavities very lightly to bring it back to wood, if that's even possible. It would make it slightly bigger than standard but, if that metalic paint didn't absorb to much in, would make a clean job...
     
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  4. Stubie78

    Stubie78 Strat-Talker

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    Mmh, tough one. I'd personally persevere with trying to remove as much as you can with cotton swabs and mild detergent, the paint being water soluble. You've probably already done this so failing that yeah, i'd go with the lacquer. Or you could declare on sale and let the buyer decide. They might end up shielding it themselves!
     
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  5. Stubie78

    Stubie78 Strat-Talker

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    Personally I don't mind a tidy shielding job. One I did myself earlier this year.
    20210330_232437.jpg
     
  6. rolandson

    rolandson Dr. Stratster

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    It's a 64.
    If I were considering such a purchase, there is absolutely no way that I'd pay the $ that accompanies these without putting eyes on every bit of minutiae it carries with it. Thus, despite an exquisite shielding job, I would insist upon seeing what is under it.

    While I have every intention of full disclosure, I don't expect a buyer to take my word for anything.
     
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  7. Will Lefeurve

    Will Lefeurve Most Honored Senior Member

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    I'd leave the shielding. At the end of the day if you explain what you've done they can either take you at your word or request an examination. You know you're not hiding anything so can look a buyer straight in the eye. If I was going to buy it your bit of paint removal wouldn't worry me whatsoever..
     
  8. Stubie78

    Stubie78 Strat-Talker

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    Sounds like common sense to me, besides the only person that would know would be the owner. Its not on show so no biggy.
     
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  9. Strat-Slinger

    Strat-Slinger Senior Stratmaster

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    I know folks get very weird about "details" with vintage guitar buys... I can't see how either a well done shielding job or the light lacquering is going to be a deterrent to a valid sale... frankly, I see the shielding tape as the less intrusive of those two options... and the easiest one to reverse if the buyer wishes to tinker with it..
    Speaking for myself.. I would be happy knowing that he vintage electronics are safe and free from harm from the substance applied that prompted the shielding job in the first place! This would be a plus"... not a "minus" in my book...
     
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  10. Bazz Jass

    Bazz Jass Chairman of the Fingerboard Silver Member

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    Just to clarify - you've removed the shielding tape, and uncovered the remnants of shielding paint?

    Just went back and reread your original post years ago...

    So you had a good go with lighter fluid, but didn't get all of it out? Is there a chance that what you can't get out won't do any further damage?

    I really don't know much about the whole shielding process, but have a repair-guy friend who would shield a vintage strat in a heart beat. One of the many things we disagree on!

    Some sort of removeable clear film perhaps?
     
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  11. EyeLikeTortoise

    EyeLikeTortoise Strat-Talker

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    It doesn't look like there is that much shielding paint left in the cavities. Maybe give one more go at stripping what shielding paint remains and then just leave it and let the next buyer know that there is a little bit of shielding paint residue left in the cavities. They can then either try to strip the remaining or just put copper shielding down.
     
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  12. arct

    arct Strat-O-Master

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    If I was buying a 64, and I'm not the only type of buyer there is, I'd appreciate it if you had taken the cavity down to clean wood. I don't like that crap either, and I'd start knocking the money down because of it, not because it had been taken out and left clean. I don't need no steenkeeng overrated shielding of any kind, but that's just me.

    Good luck with it, I hope you find a good home for it.

    rct
     
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  13. rolandson

    rolandson Dr. Stratster

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    Correct. Overall I was able to remove a good deal of it, but not all. And as the dust is conductive, any residual stands a good chance of causing problems. And therein lies the issue...It's unlikely that anything short of chemical stripping will remove this sh!t. Which is no solution at all.

    I like the idea of a clear film. Hesitant to use a cellophane tape out of concerns over the adhesive composition; I can imagine the kind of goo it decompses to. But...a layer of something like cellophane wrapping between the electronics and the cavity affords a degree of protection... until a purchaser makes it not my problem anymore...!
     
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  14. Bazz Jass

    Bazz Jass Chairman of the Fingerboard Silver Member

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    I'd just explain it exactly the way you have here to any potential buyer. Imagine going to all the trouble and they shield it again! Let the next guy decide. In the meantime? Cling wrap is your friend :)
     
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  15. abnormaltoy

    abnormaltoy Mouth draggin' knuckle breather

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    I'd prefer a light coat of lacquer...but, would a very light wire brush do you any good?
     
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  16. rolandson

    rolandson Dr. Stratster

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    I've given thought to a soft brass or bronze .30 chamber brush in a Dremel at low speed for the sides of the routes. What I'm working at avoiding is damaging the finish underneath. Tomorrow is another day...we'll see!
     
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  17. Leofender

    Leofender Strat-Talker Silver Member

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    Original condition is expected by most buyers...
    Go figure!
    It is awesome that you care so much about the future of your guitar and the new owner too.
    Given that you have already removed the black conductive paint, it does mean that the decision was made. I reckon you will inform the new owner, that way it's full disclosure, no stress.
     
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  18. Michelotti

    Michelotti Strat-Talker Silver Member

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    I’ve got my doubts about using a power tool, rather than working by hand?

    How about a Jewellers Scratch Brush?
    (eg search ‘fibreglass brush’ on Amazon).
    That wouldn’t add any further metal debris, just some micron-sized plastic particles to vacuum away.
    If you were to give it a go, gloves are a good idea, and keep eyes well clear !
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2021
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  19. rolandson

    rolandson Dr. Stratster

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    Yeah...well, ya know what happens to a chamber brush a low Dremel speed? Damn thing bends over and then sails across the room. Little shaft snapped clean.

    Coulda shot my eye out.

    Right then. This thing is done. I'm knocking a grand off the price for the inconvenience and being finished with it. Ugh.
     
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  20. vid1900

    vid1900 Most Honored Senior Member

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    I'd just put the copper tape back in, and let the buyer know it's there.

    I see tons of vintage strats with tape, does not seem to lower the value at all.