Applewood

tery

Dr. Stratster
Jul 31, 2014
12,499
Tennessee
Apple trees are not big enough .
Maybe Orange trees ?

images
 

trapdoor2

Senior Stratmaster
Oct 25, 2017
2,065
South Carolina
Fruitwoods have been used in luthery since day one. Very commonly used for faux ebony veneers (dyed black, of course). Apple, Pear, etc. Many cheap old banjos had fretboards of dyed fruitwood.

Generally, not available in large enough sizes for bodies but one could certainly glue up enough sticks for a body.
 

dirocyn

Most Honored Senior Member
Jan 20, 2018
6,797
Murfreesboro, TN
This stack is 100% crab apple, from a tree in my yard that died in a late freeze this spring.

tgfD2atuXA3cygQlL1KHwwuNNeWw0Ru7CZi8unQkFltOwFqFnlUGvG6FcpBD6WN9wmqmZbmf0QjiHJ79fP56jzXsiLLvrPoAClXq0riA0CGG_N2X_gJl3fo9BQC3b66UQigGiHgjlPc34zNcFx5UFyyUYcudNKP8A4T0u85cB8-SVaTblvtW3pPJEFp3PwwXIKTfcSkT5W7jOssFe_2j4urU4_kO4oxYazaezZmfBVeIm42XRcmyW_OF59MUWgjy8hoZ5kLbzs1BsHOCSDQhiq9-MKvAqjI3Y1VP-FtRVDLBJ9PeExWCwy0emihJyZxdWyYaREYxkcIxgmn_aCBirutkOSZrMNKJ40Di_x4u4eheiRihvLCtx1IsXgcg8mBfjgX1bcXxctNMlD0_91A5DZ45lSJkzMdXDjQ84uA85QuBLzJJE2LsH9QC4PRhSM2_R1mEEQniU7KdWjzklLYUrOzVJpiuVmSK5pbLfaliZZk3V_rWyMv7BF27txEiklWmjUnWaFELHr04-pyhewsLIujIgKsos6UYZxp6_9Ayn4q7xj9CAkcZbBZACjVfPOlMZZFGmMy5AlqsI_hJ35dRpFuXKopwKDj2zZaj3d-IBxb7dNCYQLe4LBLJZKHFllsRroiwZYF4VeiIgH3gK6ITKdWZPhnEFkug6iA5OGXlPvHrwW5PCxsqF6TFXWglelczCdala-Coxxq5Pd2kWZNNriU=w708-h943-no


Most of it is 1" planks in lengths less than 3 feet. I did save out a few 2" pieces, possibly enough to make a guitar body. It is a hard wood, MUCH harder than pine or ash. A little harder than cherry, but not nearly so hard as maple. Right now it's pretty heavy, but it will lose weight as it dries. It may still make for a heavy guitar.

Most of it will become decorative boxes, picture frames or whatever other ideas I come up with. Maybe an end table, likely some cutting boards. But not until at least next October, it needs a year to dry.

Crab Apple trees rarely have long straight pieces, and apple is the same. Cutting it into lumber makes a lot of short pieces and there's a lot of waste. Production sawmills will always prefer long straight pieces where they can get good quality boards in lengths 8' and longer, with minimal repositioning. This whole tree could not have made a single 8' 2x4, it was very crooked. Possibly it could have made a half-dozen 3-4' 2x8s--just not with the equipment I have. I doubt if any lumber mills would want to touch this stuff.

It makes a lot more sense to use this kind of wood for smoking meats. It does smell really nice when it burns.
 

dirocyn

Most Honored Senior Member
Jan 20, 2018
6,797
Murfreesboro, TN

Actually the opposite. It's real hard wood, tough to cut. Tripped my breaker more than once trying to rip this stuff.

Guitars are frequently made of much softer woods--ash, alder, mahogany, pine, poplar, basswood, agathis--are all softer than apple. Maple is harder.

The issue is it grows crooked so you can't get any long boards out of a tree.
 

Tremoluxer

Strat-O-Master
Gold Supporting Member
Jul 28, 2020
514
Ypsilanti, Michigan
While looking at restaurant menus in the past several years, specifically restaurants serving bacon, it occurred to me that applewood-smoked bacon is fairly common. It seems to me that applewood flavor must be fairly popular. So then, how about applewood for guitars?

I'm building an electric uke, a scaled-down version of a Les Paul Jr. I have some Spalted Pearwood that I'm considering using for the top. The body and neck are Spanish Cedar, which isn't actually Cedar, it looks like Honduras Mahogany, but the aroma is Cedar-like. It's the wood of choice for Classical guitar necks.

Spalted Pearwood.jpg

Spalted Pearwood
Back in the '90s ("Ayep, the best of times, the 1890s were, kids!") I cut down the remains of a dead Pear tree. This chunk is 15" long x 9" at wide end, 5" at narrow end, and 1 3/4" thick. I have one other piece the same length, but thicker and narrower. I haven't yet decided which piece I'll use.
 

Tremoluxer

Strat-O-Master
Gold Supporting Member
Jul 28, 2020
514
Ypsilanti, Michigan
This stack is 100% crab apple, from a tree in my yard that died in a late freeze this spring.

tgfD2atuXA3cygQlL1KHwwuNNeWw0Ru7CZi8unQkFltOwFqFnlUGvG6FcpBD6WN9wmqmZbmf0QjiHJ79fP56jzXsiLLvrPoAClXq0riA0CGG_N2X_gJl3fo9BQC3b66UQigGiHgjlPc34zNcFx5UFyyUYcudNKP8A4T0u85cB8-SVaTblvtW3pPJEFp3PwwXIKTfcSkT5W7jOssFe_2j4urU4_kO4oxYazaezZmfBVeIm42XRcmyW_OF59MUWgjy8hoZ5kLbzs1BsHOCSDQhiq9-MKvAqjI3Y1VP-FtRVDLBJ9PeExWCwy0emihJyZxdWyYaREYxkcIxgmn_aCBirutkOSZrMNKJ40Di_x4u4eheiRihvLCtx1IsXgcg8mBfjgX1bcXxctNMlD0_91A5DZ45lSJkzMdXDjQ84uA85QuBLzJJE2LsH9QC4PRhSM2_R1mEEQniU7KdWjzklLYUrOzVJpiuVmSK5pbLfaliZZk3V_rWyMv7BF27txEiklWmjUnWaFELHr04-pyhewsLIujIgKsos6UYZxp6_9Ayn4q7xj9CAkcZbBZACjVfPOlMZZFGmMy5AlqsI_hJ35dRpFuXKopwKDj2zZaj3d-IBxb7dNCYQLe4LBLJZKHFllsRroiwZYF4VeiIgH3gK6ITKdWZPhnEFkug6iA5OGXlPvHrwW5PCxsqF6TFXWglelczCdala-Coxxq5Pd2kWZNNriU=w708-h943-no


Most of it is 1" planks in lengths less than 3 feet. I did save out a few 2" pieces, possibly enough to make a guitar body. It is a hard wood, MUCH harder than pine or ash. A little harder than cherry, but not nearly so hard as maple. Right now it's pretty heavy, but it will lose weight as it dries. It may still make for a heavy guitar.

Most of it will become decorative boxes, picture frames or whatever other ideas I come up with. Maybe an end table, likely some cutting boards. But not until at least next October, it needs a year to dry.

Crab Apple trees rarely have long straight pieces, and apple is the same. Cutting it into lumber makes a lot of short pieces and there's a lot of waste. Production sawmills will always prefer long straight pieces where they can get good quality boards in lengths 8' and longer, with minimal repositioning. This whole tree could not have made a single 8' 2x4, it was very crooked. Possibly it could have made a half-dozen 3-4' 2x8s--just not with the equipment I have. I doubt if any lumber mills would want to touch this stuff.

It makes a lot more sense to use this kind of wood for smoking meats. It does smell really nice when it burns.

Beautiful!
 

Baelzebub

Dr. Stratster
Nov 1, 2019
14,790
State of Disbelief
Actually the opposite. It's real hard wood, tough to cut. Tripped my breaker more than once trying to rip this stuff.

Guitars are frequently made of much softer woods--ash, alder, mahogany, pine, poplar, basswood, agathis--are all softer than apple. Maple is harder.

The issue is it grows crooked so you can't get any long boards out of a tree.
 

Boubou

Senior Stratmaster
Gold Supporting Member
Jan 6, 2009
3,965
Montreal
Someone gave me firewood once, there were all these straight logs, I asked what they were, he told me they were is Apple tree. I put them all aside , I have used some to turn things with , it’s a beautiful wood. It wasn’t dried properly , so they are cracked, I have to be careful.
 

ukoldgit

Dr. Stratster
Feb 20, 2018
10,753
Wiltshire UK
Had to cut down a 40" dia cider apple tree over in France, how big a guitar shall we make? and it was hard and once dried was a little like oak, burned lovely.
 


Top