Bass Tone

Discussion in 'Ace's BASS Place' started by bobthecanadian, Aug 28, 2007.

  1. bobthecanadian

    bobthecanadian Strat-O-Master

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    So, I have a Yamaha 5-string bass that I play occasionally and gig with. It has a bright sound and I would like to mellow it out a little bit. I like the thud and thump sounds of the 60' and 70'. How do I get this sound? Strings? Electronics?

    Please tell me your suggestions. Cheaper is better, but all suggestions are welcome.

    Bob
     
  2. Strattysteve

    Strattysteve New Member!

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    I have only just joined the form hence the delayed reply. A relatively cheap suggestion I would make is strings-maybe the flatwound strings might help.
     
  3. bobthecanadian

    bobthecanadian Strat-O-Master

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    I did the easiest thing I could think of to start with. I shielded it, made sure there were 250K pots and then wired it up making sure there was sufficient grounding. All seems to be well. It isn't quite what I was hoping for but I am happy with the improvement in sound.

    Bob

    PS - If I ever change the strings I will probably try flats.
     
  4. Duffy

    Duffy Strat-Talk Member

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    Flatwounds

    I would suggest getting real flatwounds, not the ones that are supposed to sound like round wounds. The heavier gauge ones sound bassier, but are stiff and put more stress on the neck so make sure your neck can take it and you may need to do a truss rod adj.

    I love flatwounds, something like Remo Pinstripes on drums. I'm a drummer first and guitar and bass second but mostly practicing guitar and bass for last two years. Played the drums tonight and just bought a new set of amber sunburst pro quality Sonor Conga drums: 12.5, 11.75, and 11.00 inches each with free stands, basket type like I like. The Congas are a blast. I have them next to my bed so I can sit there and play them. My bass is on the bed and my bass amp is next to the bed. My guitar is on the bed and my guitar amps are at the head of the bed within reach and I play myself to sleep every night and love it. Very relaxing and I get lots of practice time in.

    Flatwounds, nice ones. I understand the ones with the most bronze in them sound the best, stainless and chromes sound more bright. So you have to look around a little. The Fender flatwounds are probably what I'll try next but I have had luck with Rotosounds.

    Duffy
     
  5. dtfan4ever

    dtfan4ever Strat-Talker

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    If you can, start with messing about with the EQ and experiment playing closer to the neck. The closer to the neck you get the warmer your playing becomes.

    Obviously, changing stuff can help, but start first with what you've got and narrow down what it is that you want your bass to do. When you know what the full range of capabilities are of the instrument as they are currently, you'll know what changes will benefit you.

    Bass strings aren't exactly as cheap as guitar strings. So that's why I'm hesitant to tell you to change the strings.

    Generally, you should learn to coax the bass to sound the way you want with your fingers first. When you've done that move on to the electronics on your bass while keeping your amp eq flat. When you've done that then learn to mess around with your amp a bit.
     
  6. Jackie Treehorn

    Jackie Treehorn Strat-Talker

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    Try stuffing a piece of foam rubber under the strings right by the bridge. Should add to the thump factor and is cheaper than flatwounds.
     
  7. cmatthes

    cmatthes Strat-Talk Member

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    Try a compressor or Graphic Equalizer pedal. Works for me!
     
  8. td1368

    td1368 New Member!

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    Try turning down the tone knob first on the bass. Don't know what type of amp you have but you can also turn down the treble frequency on EQ. Also if the strings are round wound and new they are brighter but will mellow out as they get older.