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Battle scars

Discussion in 'Sidewinders Bar & Grille' started by Blazer, Dec 30, 2006.

  1. Blazer

    Blazer Strat-Talk Member

    Messages:
    19
    Joined:
    May 3, 2006
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    Let's talk about the guitars we own that have sustained the most damage throughout the years and talk in detail what kind of dings and chip they have.

    My most busted up guitar just has to be my 1989 Squier Stratocaster with the affectionate nickname "The veteran"
    [​IMG]
    Everything apart from the body itself has been replaced one time or another. It's already down to its fourth neck and its sixth set of pickups. As for damage, here's the list.

    1. Part of the headstock was broken off and I repaired it by glueing on a new piece of maple, you can see the repair because I couldn't get the shade of the color right and the low E string tuner is slightly off.

    2. Again on the neck, a piece of maple I inlayed at the thumb end of the first position. A repair of an unfortunate mishap with the beltsander I used to repair the headstock. I used a black felt tip marker to give the illusion of the rosewood fingerboard being unharmed, you can see it but it doesn't hinder playing.

    3. At the neck pocket there's a notable gap between the high E end of the neck. The current neck apparently has a narrower butt than the previous ones but it doesn't hinder playing at all.

    4. At the same place of the neck pocket a far more serious one, there's a crack running down the lower cutaway. I need to be careful with that one.

    5. There's four plugged up holes on both cutaway horns where I experimented with strapbutton placement.

    6. And similarly there's four plugged up holes at the bottom of the guitar where I experimented with strap button placement.

    7. The most visible thing in the picture, a chip in the finish running paralel with the bridge pickup at the arm end of the body

    8. Also clearly visible: there's a chip at the lower cutaway horn.

    9. Just below the chip I mentioned is a strange crescent moon shaped ding, no idea how that one came about.

    10 two dents on the lower part of the body, not enough to chip the finish but you can feel and see them, they are situated paralel to the middle pickup and the first Tone pot.

    11. A couple of nicks at the arm slope at the upper part of the body, silent witnesses of a show where the guitar fell from the stand.

    12. A big chip on the back of the guitar around the place where the bottom strap button is, silent witness to one occasion where my strap came loose and my guitar plummetted to the ground. ("Eh, straplocks, what's that?")

    13. A message of love from my first girlfriend scratched a little higher. ("I will always be close to you when you play that guitar honey.")

    14. A lot of holes underneath the pickguard from replacing pickguards and using a hammer and nail to make new screw holes in order to make a pickguard fit. ("Oh you're suppose to use a drill, blimey!")

    Oh if only my guitar could talk...
     
  2. Joe-Bob

    Joe-Bob Strat-Talk Member

    Messages:
    13
    Joined:
    May 22, 2006
    Location:
    Dallas, Texas
    Mine generally don't accumulate damage. I never bought into the idea that old meant beat up.
     
  3. remember5

    remember5 Strat-Talk Member

    Messages:
    66
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2007
    Location:
    Hixson, Tennessee
    I'm with Joe Bob. I have always taken care of my axes. I did have a friend back in the 60s who bragged that you could run over his 57 with a volkswagen and it wouldn't get hurt because the case was bullet proof. His band mates hid the guitar and ran over the case with a VW. He had a stroke!! He almost cried, and then they opened the case. It did put a big scrape mark on the corner, which gave the case (tweed) some character.
     
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