Broken trussrod

Discussion in 'Acoustic Soundboard' started by Olddogmike, Jun 27, 2021.

  1. Olddogmike

    Olddogmike Strat-Talker

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    The other day, I picked up a Fender F55-12 in a dirty distressed condition for a song. i set about taking off the old dirty strings off, and giving it a good clean. Surprising it cleaned up well after removing the dirt and grime, its now a clean guitar with no bumps or scars, and the woodwork has a nice sheen, the fretboard came good, and the frets are in good condition. The machine heads were showing signs of corrosion and need to be replaced. The fly in the ointment is after removing the trussrod cover on the headstock, I find there is no adjusting nut, and i see it has been broken off.
    Does anyone have advise on how to get this fixed? Its a shame to let a nice guitar go unrepaired.
     
  2. Colnago1

    Colnago1 Senior Stratmaster

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    Are you certain that there isn’t an Allen keyed hole down in there? Most import models don’t have a hex nut, but use an Allen key for truss rods.
    Look a little deeper in there.
     
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  3. ibdrkn1

    ibdrkn1 Senior Stratmaster

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    Plus one on looking a little closer. Most Fenders take an Allen Key.

    Not that I'm very familiar with older fender acoustics. I would just be surprised if it's supposed to have a hex nut.

    Also, does it even need a truss rod adjustment?

    Pics?
     
  4. Olddogmike

    Olddogmike Strat-Talker

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    No Allen key socket unfortunately. All of my other guitars have Allen key so I am familiar with those , it just has the stubb of the shaft visible remaining. Its a bit hard getting a pic down a truss rod hole.
     
  5. rmackowsky

    rmackowsky Strat-Talker

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    It may just be missing the nut. Can you see the threads on the rod?
     
  6. Olddogmike

    Olddogmike Strat-Talker

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    No, I cannot even see the end of the truss rod, just a metal plate at the bottom of the hole with a square hole where the truss rod should be.
     
  7. myredstrat

    myredstrat Senior Stratmaster

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  8. ibdrkn1

    ibdrkn1 Senior Stratmaster

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    Well...... That doesn't sound good.

    I'm not going to pretend I know how to fix that but I assume it requires pulling off the fretboard at least.

    Again, does it need a truss adjustment or can it be enjoyed as is "for the price paid"?

    Odds are a 12 string does really need a functioning rod though.

    I have removed a truss rod on a Strat but not on an acoustic. I imagine it's a little harder to get back together properly.
    2012-07-05 13.13.45.jpg
    2012-07-05 13.23.39.jpg
    2012-07-05 13.23.33.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2021
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  9. Olddogmike

    Olddogmike Strat-Talker

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    A serial number search shows it was made in Korea 1988 to 1995, so I suppose its worth trying to make good, but I suppose the cost of repair vs its value will be the determining factor.
     
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  10. Olddogmike

    Olddogmike Strat-Talker

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    What was the difficulty factor removing that fretboard?
     
  11. Colnago1

    Colnago1 Senior Stratmaster

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    It’s mostly fear. Removing a fretboard requires heat and a few thin metal objects that can be slide between the neck and the fretboard while heating it up enough to release the glue and keep moving the thin metal appliances along between the two until you reach the end and the entire board is removed.
    It takes guts to do so,
    Especially if it’s your first time.
     
  12. myredstrat

    myredstrat Senior Stratmaster

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  13. Olddogmike

    Olddogmike Strat-Talker

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    I have an old neck which I removed a while back which has a good truss rod. I might try that to test my keyboard removal skills first.
     
  14. ibdrkn1

    ibdrkn1 Senior Stratmaster

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    Pretty easy. The heat gun softened the glue, then just worked the butter knives from one end to the other (stopping to apply more heat).

    This neck had a twist. I removed the board and rod, ran it over the jointer to make it flat, then put back together.

    Probably a lot harder job on an acoustic.
     
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  15. Olddogmike

    Olddogmike Strat-Talker

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    Just tried it on a twisted neck I had, ended up scorching the original fretboard and no success.
     
  16. ibdrkn1

    ibdrkn1 Senior Stratmaster

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    I'm guessing the heat was set too hot or used too close. It doesn't take a lot of heat to soften the glue. This neck was from an 86/7 MIJ 62.