BTS tickets on sale for more than £3000

stratman323

Dr. Stratster
Apr 21, 2010
38,001
London, UK
I had the most pleasant experience, coming early by boat, sunny weather (yes, sunny in London), having some sushis and sitting 15 meters from John Cleese !

Yes I remember that we had a nice sunny evening as we found a place for a couple of drinks down by the river.

But the o2 is a vile place, & no doubt a death trap for those in the "cheap" seats - hasn't anyone else noticed how few fire escapes there are at the top level?
 

Triple Jim

Guy Who Likes to Play Guitar
Silver Member
Feb 27, 2018
8,367
North Carolina
Please see post #13 which explains that. There are some horrifically rich people living in London.

I saw it, and as I said above, I'm happy that there are people with enough money to buy those tickets and stimulate the economy.

Admittedly our economic beliefs are not identical, partly because we come from somewhat different economic systems. That's OK with me. :)

If a performer or band doesn't like the things happening to ticket sales like catering to the rich, they have the option of changing things. They could, for example, require fixed prices to be charged at the door just before the show starts, allowing only one ticket per person. There might still be a few who buy a single ticket, then sell it later when the booth sells out, but the scalping industry would be kept away.

I get a lot more enjoyment from the less famous acts who play in small clubs. My wife and I saw Popa Chubby again a month ago in a club in Durham for $20 each, and we sat about 10 feet from the band. Every Wednesday evening that club has its weekly open mic blues night. I'm doing my part to stamp out scalping!
 

wmachine

Strat-Talker
Mar 5, 2016
386
Ohio
Seems part of the problem is that we are being overtaken by the "highest bidder" syndrome. This is sadly not just tickets, it is virtually everything. "Deals" being snatched up by resellers. You name it, the reseller is there. One can say, "hey that's fair". Fair or not, I don't consider it fair, and no I don't like it. Being considered fair is part of the bad mentality out there. We are becoming accustomed to warped values, and then consider them fair.
 

axis69

Senior Stratmaster
Feb 5, 2016
1,439
LA
The LA Times had a story in the last year about how the official ticket seller's will sell huge blocks of tickets to scalpers and get a kickback-so they actually are getting 2 sales per ticket!

The last time I saw a rock concert I paid 10 or 12$...yngwe or Ozzy,1985ish.
 

stratman323

Dr. Stratster
Apr 21, 2010
38,001
London, UK
The LA Times had a story in the last year about how the official ticket seller's will sell huge blocks of tickets to scalpers and get a kickback-so they actually are getting 2 sales per ticket!

The last time I saw a rock concert I paid 10 or 12$...yngwe or Ozzy,1985ish.

Exactly - it's not a simple problem.

A very helpful woman in the Royal Albert Hall box office explained to me (some years ago) that the reason that they (the RAH) often don't have many of the best seats to sell to customers is because the promoter retains large blocks of the best tickets to distribute to whoever they want. Presumably, the highest bidder wins. So the promoter makes an extra cut from selling blocks of lucrative tickets to a high-cost agency, which then sells the tickets on at vast mark-ups. Every extra snout in the trough in this chain inflates the final price for the genuine fan.

It's a racket, & rackets usually need to be outlawed in order to get rid of them. This racket certainly won't go away of it's own accord
 

stratman323

Dr. Stratster
Apr 21, 2010
38,001
London, UK
I saw it, and as I said above, I'm happy that there are people with enough money to buy those tickets and stimulate the economy.

Admittedly our economic beliefs are not identical, partly because we come from somewhat different economic systems. That's OK with me. :)

If a performer or band doesn't like the things happening to ticket sales like catering to the rich, they have the option of changing things. They could, for example, require fixed prices to be charged at the door just before the show starts, allowing only one ticket per person. There might still be a few who buy a single ticket, then sell it later when the booth sells out, but the scalping industry would be kept away.

I get a lot more enjoyment from the less famous acts who play in small clubs. My wife and I saw Popa Chubby again a month ago in a club in Durham for $20 each, and we sat about 10 feet from the band. Every Wednesday evening that club has its weekly open mic blues night. I'm doing my part to stamp out scalping!

I'm not convinced that these sales do stimulate the economy. Most of the profit goes to the people who have done the least to put the show on. Parasites, in other words.

We may have different economic systems in our two countries but I get the impression that you guys don't get ripped off to the same extent that we do. It's interesting to speculate why.

I also prefer to see bands in small intimate venues, but more & more often there is no choice. More & more bands play the o2 as they can make vastly greater profits in that great aircraft hanger than they can in somewhere smaller & better like the Albert Hall. Which is why I jumped at the chance to see Clapton at the RAH in May.
 

thomquietwolf

Dr. Stratster
Gold Supporting Member
Silver Member
Dec 2, 2010
20,664
Peardale CA
https://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/47417775

Korean K-Pop superstars BTS have sold out Wembley stadium in just 90 minutes as part of their first world wide tour. But within minutes of their release, tickets appeared on ticket re-sale sites for much higher prices.

On re-sale site, Stubhub, for example, there are tickets on sale for over £3000. That's despite the original cost of the tickets being between £50-175, with special sound-check packages setting fans back just over £200.

Now I don't imagine there are many ST members who are fans of Korean boy-band BTS, but doesn't this just show how the live concert market has been destroyed by the greed of the ticket agencies? This is a group whose target market is teenagers, especially teenage girls. Even £175 would be a lot for most of them (or their parents) to find, but £3000? :eek:

In a recent thread on here, one ST member suggested that if he ruled the world, he would cut the hands off shoplifters. If that is acceptable, perhaps we should have a poll attached to this thread? A poll to determine which body part we would surgically remove from the people responsible for this abuse of market position?

That makes
Hookers
N
Alimony
Look like the low price thread...
 

axis69

Senior Stratmaster
Feb 5, 2016
1,439
LA
Exactly - it's not a simple problem.

A very helpful woman in the Royal Albert Hall box office explained to me (some years ago) that the reason that they (the RAH) often don't have many of the best seats to sell to customers is because the promoter retains large blocks of the best tickets to distribute to whoever they want. Presumably, the highest bidder wins. So the promoter makes an extra cut from selling blocks of lucrative tickets to a high-cost agency, which then sells the tickets on at vast mark-ups. Every extra snout in the trough in this chain inflates the final price for the genuine fan.

It's a racket, & rackets usually need to be outlawed in order to get rid of them. This racket certainly won't go away of it's own accord
I saw all the bands I wanted to see by the mid 80s.Someone offered me free tickets for the stones in 89 and I passed because they were way past their prime.
Sometime in the late 80s tickets doubled to about 20$ and people were griping.I thought 20$ was insane.I guess concerts today are a commodity business.
 

stratman323

Dr. Stratster
Apr 21, 2010
38,001
London, UK
I saw all the bands I wanted to see by the mid 80s.Someone offered me free tickets for the stones in 89 and I passed because they were way past their prime.
Sometime in the late 80s tickets doubled to about 20$ and people were griping.I thought 20$ was insane.I guess concerts today are a commodity business.

Well, to play devil's advocate for a moment, back in the 80s bands used to make most of their money from record sales. Tours were mainly arranged to plug the latest record.

Now it's the other way round. There is little money to be made from download sales, so bands earn their income from live shows. That alone is probably enough to justify concert tickets doubling in price - but I don't mind that. I don't mind the bands I see making money from the tickets I buy. What I object to is all the grubby little middle men who all add their own cut to the ticket prices. They produce nothing - just take.
 

cappei

Strat-O-Master
Jun 24, 2017
814
Quillota, Valparaíso, Chile
The people responsible for the market position are the people who will pay £3000. There is no abuse of the market. This is how a market works.
Lunatics perhaps, but would you prefer a centrally controlled pricing system.?. Personally I think there's something to be said for it.

the market is not working if there's hoarding, those are anti-liberal practices actually, oligopolies, monopolies, are bad practices that goes against the free market . Is just as if the state will control the prices. Markets do not regulate themselves
 

[email protected]

Senior Stratmaster
Jul 4, 2013
2,063
melbourne
No, it is abuse of the market. This never happened before the days of "booking agencies" - you had to buy your ticket from the venue & the price on the ticket is the price everybody paid, whether Prince or pauper.

The ticket agencies, totally unregulated, have abused their position of power to exploit innocent consumers. It's questionable whether what they are doing is legal, as recent cases involving Ed Sheeran have proved. Hopefully this will increase the pressure on our (dysfunctional) government to bring them all under greater control. We know we can't rely on them to self regulate.

let me preface this with my belief that markets are NOT good for everybody and I would go a long way to believing the system used by the Chinese is worth investigating.

Having said that..YES the markets ARE working. You set up your store, you offer goods for sale and you sell some or you don't.

The alternative to that is Prices are controlled centrally (usually by a government). Don't forget that the price of Labour would also be controlled and when the government decides that @stratman323 earns 3 times the amount as someone else then they can/will reduce your pay to 1/3. When @stratman323 wants to sell his Tokai (not that you ever would) the central controlling mechanism will set the price whether you belive that to be fair or not.

Markets aren't FAIR. They are what they are. Most of the western world live via this mecahnism and centrally controlled economies have MOSTLY failed. BUT..as I said China seems to be doing welll with it.

3,000 pounds for a ticket to see a boy band. Hey man, if your stupid enough fine, but I don't want a government that tells me how much or little I can earn.

Please note once again. Markets do not produce the best result for everybody, but they are doing in this example exactly what they are there for. Stupid, I know.
 

[email protected]

Senior Stratmaster
Jul 4, 2013
2,063
melbourne
the market is not working if there's hoarding, those are anti-liberal practices actually, oligopolies, monopolies, are bad practices that goes against the free market . Is just as if the state will control the prices. Markets do not regulate themselves

No they don't. And in a FAIRER society, markets can and should be regulated.
 

cappei

Strat-O-Master
Jun 24, 2017
814
Quillota, Valparaíso, Chile
let me preface this with my belief that markets are NOT good for everybody and I would go a long way to believing the system used by the Chinese is worth investigating.

Having said that..YES the markets ARE working. You set up your store, you offer goods for sale and you sell some or you don't.

The alternative to that is Prices are controlled centrally (usually by a government). Don't forget that the price of Labour would also be controlled and when the government decides that @stratman323 earns 3 times the amount as someone else then they can/will reduce your pay to 1/3. When @stratman323 wants to sell his Tokai (not that you ever would) the central controlling mechanism will set the price whether you belive that to be fair or not.

Markets aren't FAIR. They are what they are. Most of the western world live via this mecahnism and centrally controlled economies have MOSTLY failed. BUT..as I said China seems to be doing welll with it.

3,000 pounds for a ticket to see a boy band. Hey man, if your stupid enough fine, but I don't want a government that tells me how much or little I can earn.

Please note once again. Markets do not produce the best result for everybody, but they are doing in this example exactly what they are there for. Stupid, I know.

But China has other problems, they equally generate exclusion and poverty, and the way to make work the fierce free market sistem they got goin' on is on base of awfull human rights violations in general. and a huge concentration of wealth. China, as I once read, is a dreamland for market, autoritarian politics at home, free market abroad. While central economies are not the answer, maybe countries like Canada might have a better answer, with a strong social service (schools, hospitals, etc. cus' education and health are human rights, not market comodities) AFAIK, cus never been to Canada, but certanly for a lot of chileans, and latin americans, is a country that we admire for their modern policies that we would like to have in our own country.

But anyway, a concert is not a human right, (maybe?) but buyin' a lot of tickets to sell em' 1000% more expensive, it's at least an illicite. Is like knowingly making a move to scam people. I would call it a scam, or maybe asociation to comit a scam. Might not be considered as an illicite move, but the spirit behind it kind of it is.
 

[email protected]

Senior Stratmaster
Jul 4, 2013
2,063
melbourne
But China has other problems, they equally generate exclusion and poverty, and the way to make work the fierce free market sistem they got goin' on is on base of awfull human rights violations in general. and a huge concentration of wealth. China, as I once read, is a dreamland for market, autoritarian politics at home, free market abroad. While central economies are not the answer, maybe countries like Canada might have a better answer, with a strong social service (schools, hospitals, etc. cus' education and health are human rights, not market comodities) AFAIK, cus never been to Canada, but certanly for a lot of chileans, and latin americans, is a country that we admire for their modern policies that we would like to have in our own country.

But anyway, a concert is not a human right, (maybe?) but buyin' a lot of tickets to sell em' 1000% more expensive, it's at least an illicite. Is like knowingly making a move to scam people. I would call it a scam, or maybe asociation to comit a scam. Might not be considered as an illicite move, but the spirit behind it kind of it is.

Reselling tickets in Australia is called scalping. There are new laws the govern what you can and cant do but for me I dont believe there is a problem. It is no different from reselling any product (like a guitar). Obviously people around the world disagree with me because there is indeed legislation to rein it in. I just think that you dont have to buy the ticket especially when it's £3000
 

Richardtij

New Member!
May 18, 2021
1
UK
We must consider that BTS is a prevalent and international group, making tours worldwide, that's why tickets can reach such a high price. I know I have to buy with 5 months in advance for the price to be reasonable. It's a little hard to tan one, though. Usually, all this news about concerts, groups, and actors can be found here http://k0reanwatch.com/ . This is a site with the latest news but also information that may interest you. So if you need it, use it. I return to the previous topic. I think we should understand them too because they do a lot of hard work. Hope you know that.
 
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