Building my first relic Partscaster, need help please

Discussion in 'DIY Strat Forum' started by DoctorWu, Apr 11, 2021.

  1. DoctorWu

    DoctorWu Strat-Talk Member

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    I have a quick question again, the neck pocket, i should keep nitro out of it? and then the back of the guitar under the neck plate, i should paint that normal? I have not found info on this aspect anywhere.
     
  2. Fenderbaum

    Fenderbaum Strat-Talker

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    Dont lacquer the neck pocket. Keep it naked and free. I mean the whole thing.
    You should paint and lacquer the whole back. including Neck plate area.

    Now the neck plate will make a small impression in the lacquer but thats under it. Never visible.
     
  3. Miotch

    Miotch Senior Stratmaster

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    I personally screw in a stick to hold the body with when spraying. But that stick in no way covers the whole pocket. Mine have color and clear on the sides of the neck pocket and a bit on the bottom of the pocket. Never hurt anything. I think you run a greater risk of a screw ups and chipping if you try and have a clear delineation of lacquer right at the edges of the pocket.
     
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  4. CGHguitars

    CGHguitars Strat-O-Master Gold Supporting Member

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    It’s really easy to sand through the dye you put on the raw wood when you get to the “relic” part and start sanding through the color. Just a caution to go slow, and stop as soon as you get where you want to be. I’ve had some luck touching up those spots, and keeping them looking pretty natural, so not a crisis, just something to watch out for. good luck.
     
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  5. jvin248

    jvin248 Senior Stratmaster

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    .

    Just a note for when you get done with the finish... A relic is about performance and comfort. So make sure to do a downtown job on the fretwork and setup. Then sand/file any sharp paint chips, wood gouges, hardware edges so the guitar feels like a broken in pair of shoes or worn jeans.

    Also, spend time looking at actual worn guitars to ensure your artificial wear matches 'real world' conditions. Especially if you wear the fretboard.

    .
     
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  6. DoctorWu

    DoctorWu Strat-Talk Member

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    I have an old ****ty import neck, should I just cut this down and attach it for painting? I have heard to get a little bit of laquer on the edges, you are saying to keep it clean? I could just cut that neck in half and use it as a handle and drill a hook into the end to hang it. maybe I also tape the ****ty neck too so i can reuse it on another guitar?

    Thank You everyone for your help so far. What I have learned so far is this right?

    Paint the back of the guitar under the neck plate just like normal and keep the actual neck pocket as bare wood and totally clean for a nice fit? or do I leave a small amount of laquer, i see so many people talking about using washers on the handle so a tiny bit of laqcuer goes into the pocket, this is what I am worried about, so many people say different things, I feel like I am leaning towards just keeping it fully clean and using the old crappy neck as a cut in half handle.

    Gonna use baking soda to age the alder a little bit for when I relic the arm rest, the jack, the spot that I always wear down with my cord and strap. and my belt buckle spot. basically all the spots I usually stress about damaging, this is gonna be my NO STRESS guitar.

    I am also thinking about going Sanding Sealer > White Vinyl Primer > Fiesta Red > Candy Apple Red > Clear Coat > Wet Sand with Stew Mac micro sanding pads,

    Now after all the relicing is done, I notice they sell a bunch of different polishing compounds, but since I am going for a faded look should i just get the swirl remover compound and buff it out, AFTER all the other relic steps are done?

    Thanks
    Will
     
  7. Rickenbacker1953

    Rickenbacker1953 Strat-Talk Member

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    I'm a few weeks behind Been dealing with Covid making it's way thru my house . Last on of us just got cleared yesterday . Honestly wasn't that bad . Especially with the Infusion available that they gave Pres Trump.
     
  8. Rickenbacker1953

    Rickenbacker1953 Strat-Talk Member

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    At the very least you should seal the neck pocket . My neck is a fender neck that came on a completed guitar . It has nitro on it . If you leave it bare the wood might shrink and swell with the weather. Just make sure it's cured before putting things back together 10-14 days
     
  9. Mr Jagsquire

    Mr Jagsquire Strat-Talker

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    Good luck with the project; it seems to be a real learning curve for me trying to put a Strat together that doesn't look 'brand new' (though I'm not bothered about it looking like SRV's Strat either to be honest, just something slightly aged that will then wear nicely over time).

    I've found that some of the 'aged' parts that are for sale are a bit too over done as well: I bought aged Fender tuners, but they almost looked acid dipped. I compared them to the near 40 year old tuners on my avatar Strat and could see that the pegs were still very shiny, so I ended up polishing the aged tuner pegs and now they look very similar to my avatar Strat. Similar for things like the jack socket and bridge...less is more at least in my case (I suppose I'm being realistic to my own wear 'patterns').

    What I have learnt to do is to find examples of older guitars for sale with good pictures. These can be useful references, as well as my own guitar. What I'm not so convinced by are the Fender custom shop wear; in particular I think the back of the neck on them tends to look fake and I've not come across any genuine old Fenders that have necks that look like them: That awful 'line' where they seem to have masked off the neck when they sanded it back, then smeared with dark stain/oil or whatever. Maybe they feel nice and smooth (being just about bare wood), but they spoil the guitar for me.
     
  10. Rickenbacker1953

    Rickenbacker1953 Strat-Talk Member

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    I'm just about Finished with a Relic of an American Original 50's . Next week I will post it . The neck looks IMO reasonably good.
    I think you'll be interested to see My neck. Especially the back .
    Explaining what I did and how I got it to look like real realistic wear . Will be easier to follow when I post the pictures . I can tell you this . Making a Guitar look old takes a good year . What I ended up doing on the back of the neck was discovered by accident .
    I'll post early next week in this FORUM.
     
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  11. Mr Jagsquire

    Mr Jagsquire Strat-Talker

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    @Rickenbacker1953 I'm sure we'll all be interested to see it. It's the backs that I dislike the most (though the fretboard wear can sometimes look too overdone to me as well). I've just taken to using a fine 3M pad to dull the main section of my necks a while after the nitro has hardened. This blends into the polished parts of the back of the headstock and near the heel: There is no 'line', though it's also hard to see, let alone photograph, but it doesn't really look relic'd I guess, just feels very broken in, especially as I roll the fingerboard edges, smooth fret ends, etc.

    My Esquire (now Tele) a year on feels really broken in like a pair of my favourite jeans. :) It's worth the wait and combination of some actual playing wear along with the fake wear. The neck on my current Strat project still feels a little 'new' but it's already settling down after a couple of weeks on my other Strat while I carry on with spraying the body.
     
  12. Rickenbacker1953

    Rickenbacker1953 Strat-Talk Member

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    This is a Fender done by Dale Wilson . I believe I figured out with my neck how Fender produces this realistic wear look. I did alittle farther on my neck as this picture is from a Peach Guitar's Video . Where Dale Wilson was showing them a neck he was working on [​IMG]
     
  13. Mr Jagsquire

    Mr Jagsquire Strat-Talker

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    These are some examples of real 50s Strats currently for sale, similar to those I've looked at for researching my current Strat project:

    https://guitarpoint.de/de/electric/fender/1957-fender-stratocaster-sunburst-2/

    https://guitarpoint.de/de/electric/fender/1954-fender-stratocaster-0967/

    Or a Tele for comparison, for an example of a more worn guitar:
    https://guitarpoint.de/de/electric/fender/1953-fender-telecaster-blackguard-blond/

    The real ones don't look like they've been sanded away: Often some Strats I've seen when researching my '61 replica have very shiny necks, maybe only slight discolouration. It's what made me focus on just making it feel played in and not looking 'sanded'. My JV Squier is nearly 40 years old and I was young and careless when I got it, so it's had it's fair share of falls and knocks, but just feels great. I know it's poly, but you have to look closely to see the wear/marks mostly, apart from a few wear marks on the fingerboard: This is a guitar that is on it's way to needing a second re-fret, so it's had plenty of use.

    Tl;dr: I wouldn't get too hung up on striping the lacquer off the back trying to imitate a real 50s Strat, only if you want to imitate a CS guitar perhaps.
     
  14. Seamus OReally

    Seamus OReally Mr. Serious Gold Supporting Member

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    When the guitar gets dinged, the wood fibers will compress and show new fibers underneath. Unless you get the dye to soak into the guitar at a depth of 1/4” or more, every new ding is going to look pale and new.
     
  15. Rickenbacker1953

    Rickenbacker1953 Strat-Talk Member

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    I didn't get hung up on it . I figured out how they do it . There's only so many things you can do to remove lacquer off wood, The longer it cures the harder that is . What they do to get that worn look on the back is : Is use Lacquer thinner or Acetone dabbed with a paper towel. I preferred the acetone found in nail polish remover . Before trying it Please understand there's still a proper process you follow .
    When I post my guitar you'll see I know what I am talking about .

    I play out . Infact I play with a band almost everyday for 9mths a year . I can wear out a guitar. Which is what the CS is supposedly imitating. Plus wear isn't all from just playing . People who are drunk sometimes knock your rig over . It gets banged around being worked on in a hurry . It gets bang around in travel. I can tell you this . My original 50's Strat with the POLY base lost body paint like crazy . Once it started to weather check paint just came right off with no effort needed. My guess is the lacquer in spots didn't bond very well with the POLY under coat. Somehow my whole guitar the lacquer must have been contaminated I had to remove alot of it to get it to stop . So I am sure parts of my guitars finish were wrong . Because some spots the paint wouldn't come off unless you stripped it . Other spots came loose with a guitar pick scrape.
     
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  16. Mr Jagsquire

    Mr Jagsquire Strat-Talker

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    As I said; I'm looking forward to seeing how it turns out, but I won't be trying it myself as it's not a look I care for on my own guitars. Doesn't mean I'm not interested in seeing how others do it though...good luck with it.
     
  17. Rickenbacker1953

    Rickenbacker1953 Strat-Talk Member

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    Not much of a relic guy myself . I did it because the finish on my New Fender was flaking off so bad. It would get all over my hands , clothes and even in my hair. Not just a small amount either . I couldn't get anywhere with getting it fixed without Me paying shipping of $100.00 both ways . So I started out thinking I was going to strip it and re-paint . Decided a relic would be much less work . HA HA was I wrong . I see why CS relics cost what they do. Lot's of labor
     
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  18. Rickenbacker1953

    Rickenbacker1953 Strat-Talk Member

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    Not sure what you are getting at . I watched several online videos in woodworking not guitar relicing. They showed several ways to age wood