Can't deck 2 point trem

SpringTank

Strat-Talker
Feb 14, 2019
141
Canada
Hey all. Picked up a new Strat today. I haven't owned a 2 point trem before and went about setting it up the way I like, only to discover I can't fully deck the trem. The post side sits about a 32nd off the body and can't go lower.

I'm OCD and this is irking me a little. Can I get shorter posts/higher threads or am I just stuck with the gap? I know it won't make a difference once I block the trem, just curious if it's a known thing and can be "fixed".
 

Andrew Wasson

Senior Stratmaster
Silver Member
Nov 6, 2018
3,834
Vancouver, Canada
Welp.... Now you've gone and triggered my OCD :eek:

I've got a 2-point fender and I swapped out the bridge for a Wilkinson model so I've got the posts and the inserts in the case. I just pulled them out and yes, I can see that the length of the inserts inserts are shorter than the posts. The actual issue however is that the threaded adjuster will never go any lower than the top of the threads though because it is a larger diameter than the threads.

I mean... Nothings impossible. If you were dead set on doing it, you could pull the inserts and put them on a lathe, bore them out slightly and then put them back in the body. You would need to drill just about an 1/8" or so below the insert to allow the threaded adjuster to go lower though. It's not impossible. It just depends on how OCD you are, how good you are with tools and how well equipped your shop is.
 

SpringTank

Strat-Talker
Feb 14, 2019
141
Canada
Welp.... Now you've gone and triggered my OCD :eek:

I've got a 2-point fender and I swapped out the bridge for a Wilkinson model so I've got the posts and the inserts in the case. I just pulled them out and yes, I can see that the length of the inserts inserts are shorter than the posts. The actual issue however is that the threaded adjuster will never go any lower than the top of the threads though because it is a larger diameter than the threads.

I mean... Nothings impossible. If you were dead set on doing it, you could pull the inserts and put them on a lathe, bore them out slightly and then put them back in the body. You would need to drill just about an 1/8" or so below the insert to allow the threaded adjuster to go lower though. It's not impossible. It just depends on how OCD you are, how good you are with tools and how well equipped your shop is.

I see. I was really hoping I could just find new posts. Lol
 

muttonbuster

Senior Stratmaster
Nov 14, 2020
1,205
República de Cantaloupia
Yes, I did this a few years ago. On Amazon, there is a store called Monster Bolts that has sets of saddle screws and measurements of their height. Make sure to keep some of the shorter screws for the low and high E strings. The tall ones will have too much post sticking out, and it will bug your wrist a bit running over them when you pick.
 

Fender Phil

Strat-Talker
Jul 22, 2015
309
Windsor Ontario Canada
2-point trems weren't designed to be decked.
It sounds as if @Andrew Wasson's method could work.

But as you say - if you block it, the issue is moot.
image.jpg
I have Godin Session Custom. It has a two point trem set flush from the factory. Action is set extremely low on this one. When the bar is installed, it is easily maneuvered, and it stays in tune.

I have only had this guitar for a short period of time, and had thoughts of floating it. I have about 10 Stratocasters that are set up to float, and this Telecaster variant guitar seems to do so many things well, as is. So decked it will remain, because it works extremely well when the bar is installed. I don’t have a Strat set up like that. No need to venture into all out Strat territory on this Telecaster variant.
 

The Ballzz

Senior Stratmaster
Feb 26, 2014
2,671
LAS VEGAS , NV
Hey all. Picked up a new Strat today. I haven't owned a 2 point trem before and went about setting it up the way I like, only to discover I can't fully deck the trem. The post side sits about a 32nd off the body and can't go lower.

I'm OCD and this is irking me a little. Can I get shorter posts/higher threads or am I just stuck with the gap? I know it won't make a difference once I block the trem, just curious if it's a known thing and can be "fixed".

@SpringTank ,
Is your intention to have it "decked" and still useable as a trem, or to "deck" it and maybe even "block"it, never to be used again?
Different possible solutions for the different scenarios.
Just Askin'
Gene
 

KenB

Strat-Talk Member
Jul 30, 2022
14
Ohio
I have a Vintera 50s Modified Strat with the two-point tremolo.
I never plan to use the trem, and I find the tuning problems with a floating tremolo intolerable.

So I blocked it, MY way!

I made an oak block to place behind the trem block, carefully shaped to exactly fit the space there.
It has perfect contact with the metal surface of the trem block, and with the alder of the body to the rear.

THEN I made a hard maple wedge to place in FRONT of the trem block. The wedge is cut from an aged maple violin bridge blank.

Block & Wedge.jpg


The block and wedge are sized so that the bridge plate is perfectly parallel with the guitar top, with a small gap of about 3/4 mm between the bridge plate and the paint.
The gap is even all the way around, but the bridge plate is NOT actually touching the top.

Bridge Gap.png

The combination of the close-fitting oak block and the maple wedge LOCKS the bridge solidly in place, just as well as if the bridge plate was decked against the top.

Tapping on the top anywhere around the bridge, or ON the bridge, shows it to be as rock-solid as a hard tail bridge would be.

And, since I didn't change the (perfect) factory setup of the trem, a future owner can simply remove the wedge and oak block, and be ready to whammy!
 

Strat-Slinger

Senior Stratmaster
Feb 9, 2013
3,416
Somewhere in Space
If this was already mentioned my apologies for being repetitive however.. if not... Perhaps adding a spring will do the trick... this will intoduce enough pull on the bridge to bring the back of the brridge down flush on the body... sometimes 3 springs isn't enough depending on one's string gauges...
 

Miotch

Most Honored Senior Member
Jun 28, 2011
5,527
ok
The only two point I ever put down flush on the body was on a Warmoth body and I put the inserts in the body. It was a Fender bridge, but maybe I put the inserts down far enough that I was able to bring the whole thing down on the body and others don't have the inserts down far enough. Son has the guitar now and it's set up to be floating, so I'm not going to track it down and experiment, but I did have the entire trem flush and sitting on the wood.
 

StratUp

Dr. Stratster
Sep 5, 2020
10,878
Altered States
The posts on a two point have those grooves. By design, the knife edges center in those grooves. Unless you were to bring the grooved section down into the bushings (machining needed as noted by @Andrew Wasson), you won't get it down enough to actually deck. By design.

But as @The Ballzz asked: What's your goal? You can block it like @KenB did. If you only use the rear block, you will eliminate tuning issues and still be able to vibrato up (no dives). Of you can full block and the bridge can / will still rest above the body but won't be going anywhere. Horses for courses.
 

Jimbo99

Senior Stratmaster
Jun 5, 2021
3,401
Palm Coast, FL
Photos of the claw & springs. At a certain point the Tremolo is effectively decked anyway, if you never use the arm/bar. You wouldn't want it to be decked on the finish of the body anyway. Get a Robert Cray HT or a Bullet HT and have both a HT & Tremolo. I have the Squier Bullet SSS HT & Affinity SSS Tremolo. Best of Both Worlds as VH sang it out loud.

 
Last edited:

SpringTank

Strat-Talker
Feb 14, 2019
141
Canada
@SpringTank ,
Is your intention to have it "decked" and still useable as a trem, or to "deck" it and maybe even "block"it, never to be used again?
Different possible solutions for the different scenarios.
Just Askin'
Gene

Hi Gene. I never use trem and so my intention was to deck it, but if I can't then I suppose I'll block it.

I try to avoid adding unnecessary weight to my guitars, but it's only 7.4 lbs.
 

SpringTank

Strat-Talker
Feb 14, 2019
141
Canada
I have a Vintera 50s Modified Strat with the two-point tremolo.
I never plan to use the trem, and I find the tuning problems with a floating tremolo intolerable.

So I blocked it, MY way!

I made an oak block to place behind the trem block, carefully shaped to exactly fit the space there.
It has perfect contact with the metal surface of the trem block, and with the alder of the body to the rear.

THEN I made a hard maple wedge to place in FRONT of the trem block. The wedge is cut from an aged maple violin bridge blank.

View attachment 608943


The block and wedge are sized so that the bridge plate is perfectly parallel with the guitar top, with a small gap of about 3/4 mm between the bridge plate and the paint.
The gap is even all the way around, but the bridge plate is NOT actually touching the top.

View attachment 608944

The combination of the close-fitting oak block and the maple wedge LOCKS the bridge solidly in place, just as well as if the bridge plate was decked against the top.

Tapping on the top anywhere around the bridge, or ON the bridge, shows it to be as rock-solid as a hard tail bridge would be.

And, since I didn't change the (perfect) factory setup of the trem, a future owner can simply remove the wedge and oak block, and be ready to whammy!

Good work! It's well done.

That cavity is cut and painted so clearly, with the trim of bare wood showing around the perimeter.

I just picked up a Player Strat and although I love it, the cavity is full of shredded wood where the holes are drilled, and the cavity plate screw holes aren't the tidiest.
 

SpringTank

Strat-Talker
Feb 14, 2019
141
Canada
The posts on a two point have those grooves. By design, the knife edges center in those grooves. Unless you were to bring the grooved section down into the bushings (machining needed as noted by @Andrew Wasson), you won't get it down enough to actually deck. By design.

But as @The Ballzz asked: What's your goal? You can block it like @KenB did. If you only use the rear block, you will eliminate tuning issues and still be able to vibrato up (no dives). Of you can full block and the bridge can / will still rest above the body but won't be going anywhere. Horses for courses.
Why is it designed to not deck?

Looks like I'll be blocking it as I'm not a trem user and prefer the stability.
 

Colnago1

Senior Stratmaster
Sep 2, 2014
1,543
Where am I?
Yes, I did this a few years ago. On Amazon, there is a store called Monster Bolts that has sets of saddle screws and measurements of their height. Make sure to keep some of the shorter screws for the low and high E strings. The tall ones will have too much post sticking out, and it will bug your wrist a bit running over them when you pick.
I think you’re on a different topic here.
 


Top