carpentry demo question: how do I trim this wood part?

lammie200

Senior Stratmaster
Apr 25, 2016
1,998
San Francisco
The old "use a bigger hammer" works!
Done plenty of work like this. A few cuts, a few scores, a pry bar and it’s out. Replacing with the size that they need, filling the joints and painting, and the job is finished. I am suggesting this because without the right tools and know how getting a straight cut to do what the OP wants to do will be very difficult both vertically and at a right angle to the surface.
Not in the trades are ya ?
Yeah, since I am a licensed architect, personally built and remodeled a few houses, and have all the tools necessary to do that I guess that I am a hack. What do you do?
 

Butcher of Strats

Senior Stratmaster
Feb 28, 2022
2,987
Maine
Done plenty of work like this. A few cuts, a few scores, a pry bar and it’s out. Replacing with the size that they need, filling the joints and painting, and the job is finished. I am suggesting this because without the right tools and know how getting a straight cut to do what the OP wants to do will be very difficult both vertically and at a right angle to the surface.

Yeah, since I am a licensed architect, personally built and remodeled a few houses, and have all the tools necessary to do that I guess that I am a hack. What do you do?
Well this was a hard question to answer, how to make a cut begs for more information.
If I want finished interior trim, I am not goung to get anything close to a clean finishcut running a jigsaw up a cabinet built into the wall.
I will carefully remove the pieces that are unsatisfactory, then make new pieces or cut the removed piece using a tool that makesclean finish cuts.
And finally nail it all gack together, caulk if needed and paint.

BTW I worked for the architect Paul Rudolph in NYC circa early 1990s making architectural models and also in his home which was modern freak show- clear plexi floors and all sorts of multi level confusion, a Steinway grand floating up in the corner on a platform, just crazy stuff.
 

simoncroft

Still playing. Still learning!
Silver Member
May 30, 2013
19,983
SE England
@circles, you are great at things I'm average at, like graphic design. From the questions and answers you've given, I'd do absolutely nothing. The trades are on their way. They're the guys with the skills to sort it all out. The last thing they want is your 'help' between the time they quoted for the job and the time they get on site.

I'm pretty handy when it comes to making things, and doing it right. But I also have big respect for the pros. I wouldn't dream of messing with a job after they'd given me a price.
 

Bob the builder

Dr. Stratster
May 2, 2016
11,290
Cranston, Rhode Island
Done plenty of work like this. A few cuts, a few scores, a pry bar and it’s out. Replacing with the size that they need, filling the joints and painting, and the job is finished. I am suggesting this because without the right tools and know how getting a straight cut to do what the OP wants to do will be very difficult both vertically and at a right angle to the surface.

Yeah, since I am a licensed architect, personally built and remodeled a few houses, and have all the tools necessary to do that I guess that I am a hack. What do you do?
IMG_20220915_094517_HDR.jpg IMG_20220901_162030_HDR.jpg


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IMG_20220816_105941_MP.jpg
I dabble with tools 🙃
 

tap4154

Strat-Talker
Jan 20, 2014
174
Southern California
I make cuts like that all the time to expand an opening for a built-in ovens or microwaves. I always use a sawzall with a good 6" metal blade about 14 teeth per inch. If it's your first time doing it, you're going to end up having the blade wander around, but with a little bit of practice it gets fairly easy. I don't know how clean you need the cut to be, but I usually cut over a little to the waste side of the cut if I need it to be clean, then sand it out with a small belt sander, or the sanding attachment on a multi-tool. Hopefully the cabinet frame is fastened very securely, so you don't have to hold the saw shoe against it, but usually those old cabinets are very well built.
 

Butcher of Strats

Senior Stratmaster
Feb 28, 2022
2,987
Maine
I make cuts like that all the time to expand an opening for a built-in ovens or microwaves. I always use a sawzall with a good 6" metal blade about 14 teeth per inch. If it's your first time doing it, you're going to end up having the blade wander around, but with a little bit of practice it gets fairly easy. I don't know how clean you need the cut to be, but I usually cut over a little to the waste side of the cut if I need it to be clean, then sand it out with a small belt sander, or the sanding attachment on a multi-tool. Hopefully the cabinet frame is fastened very securely, so you don't have to hold the saw shoe against it, but usually those old cabinets are very well built.
You got to in stall microwave ovens?
Custom kitchen, deliver eee eee eee?
 

CB91710

No GAS shortage here
Platinum Supporting Member
Feb 24, 2019
11,475
SoCal
The last thing they want is your 'help' between the time they quoted for the job and the time they get on site.
Unless there's some kind of issue that they allude to and when you say "So, if that drywall were not there when your crew arrives tomorrow...." "Oh ya, that will save 8 days and $10k of testing and remediation...."
 

Bowmap

80 seconds to midnight
Platinum Supporting Member
Dec 23, 2017
12,375
Third Door Down
I like the router method @Bob the builder mentioned the best. You will wind up with a nice flush cut that will not a lot of sanding. However, you will likely need to use a palm router like a Bosch Colt to work at that angle and maintain control. Palm routers do not have the mass of a full sized router and thus it is easier to get squirrelly with them.

A sabre saw (commonly called a jig saw) it very easy to cut into the side of the cabinet. Having a variable speed one and going slow you can get the job done. You can start the cut by curving into the line you want or a drill a hole on the cutoff piece to start it. I would not attempt a pocket start. You will have more sanding, and if you did deviate from course, a wood repair to be made.

Oscillating saw is another option and with that you might be able to flush cut from the inside out as the tool may be small enough. With those there is guide plate so it is all up to your skill using one.

No matter what tool, in looking at the pics again, is the wall to the immediate right an issue with getting a tool to rest on the face frame of the cabinet? That would quickly eliminate using a few of the tools without some sort of support.


Korbels? <perk> Nice touch.
 

circles

Resident Pinball Enthusiast
May 26, 2013
29,500
West Seattle
I make cuts like that all the time to expand an opening for a built-in ovens or microwaves. I always use a sawzall with a good 6" metal blade about 14 teeth per inch. If it's your first time doing it, you're going to end up having the blade wander around, but with a little bit of practice it gets fairly easy. I don't know how clean you need the cut to be, but I usually cut over a little to the waste side of the cut if I need it to be clean, then sand it out with a small belt sander, or the sanding attachment on a multi-tool. Hopefully the cabinet frame is fastened very securely, so you don't have to hold the saw shoe against it, but usually those old cabinets are very well built.
These things are rock solid. I plan to give it a go - at some point. Or when the next handyman is here I'll have them do it. I dunno.

This is small potatoes compared to what needs to be done in this old house overall. I had the bath tub and surrounding tiles demoed and removed. A walk in shower designed for handicapped access will be here. Eventually.


DSC_2576.JPG
 

trapdoor2

Senior Stratmaster
Oct 25, 2017
2,170
South Carolina
My favorite contractor would tell me to go to a movie...and when I got back, it would be done. When we got him to quote a bathroom remodel, it was too expensive.

"What if I do the demo?", I asked.

"More.", he said. "Much more."
 

CB91710

No GAS shortage here
Platinum Supporting Member
Feb 24, 2019
11,475
SoCal
Kitchens are more fun than baths IMO.
Well, ya... You can always BBQ and go for take-out while the kitchen is being done.

A Home Depot bucket in the back yard and a wet washcloth gets old REALLY quick.
 

lammie200

Senior Stratmaster
Apr 25, 2016
1,998
San Francisco
BTW I worked for the architect Paul Rudolph in NYC circa early 1990s making architectural models and also in his home which was modern freak show- clear plexi floors and all sorts of multi level confusion, a Steinway grand floating up in the corner on a platform, just crazy stuff.
Cool! Was it this place? He was discussed much in theory and history classes. One of the pioneers of brutalism. Would have been a punk rocker for sure.

McClintic_and_Cornell_House,_New_York_City,_NY.jpg
 


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