Changed the way I'm holding a pick. Is it harming my playing?

Discussion in 'Stratocaster Discussion Forum' started by andymusgrave87, Oct 14, 2014.

  1. dogletnoir

    dogletnoir V----V

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    Pat Metheny uses the round end of the pick. So does George Lynch.
    Eric Johnson has also been known to 'shoulder pick' from time to time.
    Rumour has it that SRV did also.
    None of them is lacking in speed or articulation, imo.
    If you like the way it feels and sounds, then go for it.
    i don't always use a pick, but when i do, it's either a Jazz III with the pointy tip or a Jazz I which has a rounded tip, so it's like shoulder picking when i use that.
     
  2. Steve112

    Steve112 Senior Stratmaster

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    This ^^^^^^!
     
  3. kchurch

    kchurch Senior Stratmaster

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    I hold my pick exactly the same way as you do Andy. It just feels more comfortable to me!
     
  4. Whittler

    Whittler Senior Stratmaster

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    I turn my pick to the round side when I want some squeals/harmonics when I'm picking. Just hold the pick close to your thumb (very little pick sticking out past your thumb) and as you pick the string will also rub on your thumb.

    Started doing that back in the 60s and liked how it sounded.
     
  5. fenderJBstrat

    fenderJBstrat Strat-O-Master

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    I exclusively hold my pick like this because the round end seems to glide more smoothly over the strings and actually changes the sound a surprising amount.
     
  6. trashedlostfdu

    trashedlostfdu Strat-Talk Member

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    i recently made the move to the jazz iii carbon fiber. they are so grippy that they don't fall out of you hands even when hot and under lights for an hour. also they are much more precise due to size. took a while to get used to them, but i love them.

    they aren't for everybody though.
     
  7. Pinkboots

    Pinkboots Strat-O-Master

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    Round the bend.
    The pick must be held between the upper and lower canines. Of course, you will then need to amputate your nose.


    Seriously, hold the damn pick any way you want to. I am afraid I don't understand the need for validation in relation to every single aspect of playing the guitar.

    Imagine if Dick Dale had been on a forum. Or Hendrix, or Jeff Healey, or any number of a gazillion other innovators.

    Just do. Don't worry about what a bunch of anonymous nerds sitting behind a keyboard think.

    And good luck. Enjoy.
     
  8. srvsayce78

    srvsayce78 Most Honored Senior Member

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    Go with whatever feels right to you, Robben Ford holds the pick butt ways, he can cut it that way but not conventionally!

    Look how Morse, Friedman, Lynch and Van Halen all hold their picks, for the rest of us would simply not work but for them that's all they need!

    I am a firm believer in go with what feels right but I do hold my pick as per normal, I use Dunlop iii XL's as they simply last and you can feel everything you're doing! I leave a small bit of tip showing so the flap factor on the strings is reduced.
     
  9. nuculer terrist

    nuculer terrist Senior Stratmaster

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    I never knew I had something in common with srv! Go with what works.
     
  10. gilmourish007

    gilmourish007 Senior Stratmaster

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    Yep that's how I hold my pick.
     
  11. davidKOS

    davidKOS not posting these days

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    Many artists can sound good doing all sorts of odd technical things.

    Maybe what I should have said is when I use a round pick, I'm lacking in speed and articulation, compared to using a good sharp pointy pick.

    BTW, NONE of the players that have been mentioned that use the round edge of the pick (Metheney, Lynch, Robben, etc.) are an influence musically to me. They may be greats, but they are not the guys I listened to most.

    I preferred John McLaughlin and Pat Martino and their aggressive styles - pointy pick guys - to Metheney's Midwest mellow jazz style.
     
  12. stratman in va

    stratman in va Most Honored Senior Member

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    I often use the round side of a standard pick on a mandolin in a pinch when I play mando to get the chop sound going.
     
  13. dogletnoir

    dogletnoir V----V

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    i hear you loud and clear... hey, Wes got rid of the pick entirely, and still managed to play fast, cleanly articulated jazz lines with just his thumb! :)
    i love McLaughlin and Martino, but even with the pointiest pick in the world i will probably never even get close to their speed and clarity of articulation.
    i just don't think i'm ever going to be a 'fast' player, but then neither was Charlie Christian by today's standards... and i'd love to sound that good !
    i think my 'point' (LOL) was really that OP should just do what works best for him. :)
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2014
  14. davidKOS

    davidKOS not posting these days

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    And many Bluegrass players love those thick round picks. I don't.

    Isn't that always true?
     
  15. dogletnoir

    dogletnoir V----V

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    Yes, but sometimes people can get hung up on doing things the 'correct' way...
    it's liberating to know that you can possibly get to where you want to be at by using a different method. :)
     
  16. Vindibona1

    Vindibona1 Most Honored Senior Member

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    Yes. I have found that different picks produce vastly different results in feel, attack and sound. Lately I've been using a Dunlop Stubby 3.0 for most stuff. Interestingly, a Fender Heavy produces similar results without the bulk. Then there is the Dunlop 208. Feels a lot like smooth wood. It has a dark, mellow jazzy tone. I don't use it much, but in addition it is also very fast, though the attack isn't as definted as the Stubby.

    I agree with Simon. So much less work to strum with a lighter pick. But I love the big stubby on my acoustic.
     
  17. BadBrad

    BadBrad Strat-O-Master

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    I like a thicker, more rounded pick for playing mandolin. I mostly use a D'Addario ProPlec 1.5mm rounded triangle.

    For guitar, I used to use thinner teardrop picks, but now I prefer the thicker rounded triangle picks like the Fender 346 Heavy.
     

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  18. SAguitar

    SAguitar Senior Stratmaster

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    A few years ago, I took a bunch of picks and filed down the pointy end until it was about the same shape as the other two. I like to use them sometimes, and find that they give me a more rounded, fatter tone from the strings. More chunk, less funk.
     
  19. BryMelvin

    BryMelvin Senior Stratmaster Silver Member

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    Do that too...it's also easier that way to flip the pick around and hold between the back of two fingers (like you would a coin to fascinate a child) leaving ring pinky and thumb to fingerpick on another passage all while playing
     
  20. GrassHopper51

    GrassHopper51 Strat-Talker

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    For better grip I experimented with drilling some small holes in a few picks. This pattern works pretty well for me:

    image-4056649683.jpg
     

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