Considering a Custom Shop...but..

Discussion in 'Stratocaster Discussion Forum' started by Shades of Blue, Feb 8, 2021.

  1. Wrighty

    Wrighty Most Honored Senior Member

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    Hope I’ve helped. The PRS will sell, just give it time and price to sell, sensibly with a small up,fit to allow for bartering. You’ll get the right guitar when it comes along, and you’ll know you have!
     
  2. AxemanVR

    AxemanVR I appreciate, therefore I am... Silver Member

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    I totally get the desire for a Fender Custom Shop Strat, but every time I see the price people are willing to pay I think: “Have they lost their freakin minds?!?”.

    There are partscasters that look, play and sound just as good as any CS model - for a fraction of the cost (heck, I own a couple of them).

    Worst of all, what if you pay all that money and never totally bond with it? (just like your PRS).

    If I don’t bond with a $500 partscaster I can at least recoup most of my costs - something not as easy to do when it’s more like $5000.

    I’m not saying I won’t give in some day and get a Custom Shop Strat myself, but I’m not going to regret it if I don’t, since what I got suits me just fine...


     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2021
  3. AGK13

    AGK13 New Member!

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    Keep going!!! Thanks!
     
  4. BuffaloHound

    BuffaloHound Strat-O-Master

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    We started with a lot of blues. The focus of the first lesson was to learn the 5 positions of the G minor pentatonic scale (no blue note), for which there’s really no short cut except that the highest frets you play on each string are the lowest frets on the next scale. And vice versa. Since then I’ve seen other people’s takes on this they they often start with G min penta too. Play each position on the lowest note and end on the highest in that position, then back down the scale. So don’t start and end on the tonic/root. Play each new shape slowly with intention until you can zone out and your fingers keep playing the right notes.

    The goal here is to play up and down position #1, then ditto with pos #2, ect... up to position #5. At which point you would work your way from position #5 back down to position #1 (and you can get even lower by playing position #5 with open notes).
    Once you can do that add in tonic notes. So I would play G min penta in position #1 then individually hit the three G notes that appear in the scale. Rinse and repeat with every position up and down the neck. Only positions 1 and 5 have 3 tonics in the shape. The others have 2.

    Along with this we learned every note on the fretboard by name. There’s a ton of ways to cheat this, and I suggest you do. If you know the names of E-shape and A-shape power chords then you can quickly figure out every note on 5 of the 6 strings. Also, playing major chords and naming what each note is in the scale. For example play an open 5-string C chord, then play each note individually and say out loud what each note is in relation to the chord. I.e. C-tonic, E-3rd, G-5th, C-tonic, E-3rd.
    Up next 6 to 2 string blues spider scales...

    DM me if you have any questions. I don’t want to hijack this thread from the OP.
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  5. Shades of Blue

    Shades of Blue Most Honored Senior Member

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    You make a great point. I think that with a relic job, finding parts that are cohesive and will all look good together can be challenging, but not impossible. I think that for me, I don't much care about relicing, but I think the allure of a Custom Shop to me is the neck. I just have this thought that the neck on a Custom Shop will play itself. Maybe, maybe not.
     
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  6. AxemanVR

    AxemanVR I appreciate, therefore I am... Silver Member

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    `
    You certainly do have more choices with the Custom Shop.

    I like thicker, wider necks myself, so when buying off the shelf I'm pretty much stuck with what's available and I have found that the thicker necks seem to only be available on the higher end models.

    I do like the thicker/wider "Mid 60s C" profile on the Vintera 60s Strat neck I recently purchased, but still prefer the chunckier U-shaped neck on my 2003 Fender AVRI 52 Telecaster. I'm currently thinking about trying out a Fender American Original 60s neck which has a "Thick C" shape, but at $700 a pop I have to weigh whether it's going to be worth the upcharge.

    So, yeah, there is something to be said about getting what you want...


    ~65 Neck.jpg

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  7. diogoguitar

    diogoguitar Senior Stratmaster

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    I had the chance to own a couple of fender custom shops and played a few PRS guitars made in usa, so I'll give you my perspective. It really comes down to personal preference, but if I were you I wouldn't buy this specific guitar.

    PRS and fender are different monsters, so you can't really compare the two. But, now that this is what you're considering, here are my thoughts
    1. PRS guitars are generally built better than Fender. Fender custom shops are well built, don't get me wrong. It's just that PRS has some edge.
    2. Many PRS heat-treats the neck so it's more stable
    3. PRS chooses a super hard fretwire to avoid wear
    4. Prs usually has many pickup combinations between humbucker and split coils
    Fender custom shop IMO are for diehard strat players. I've owned one and it has many vintage-correct specs that you may or may not like. Example: I liked the feel of the nitro finish, but I found the back of the neck a bit sticky. To play blues rock it was fine, but found a bit grabby to play some fast leads. Some people can play whatever without a problem, but I found it a bit sticky

    About heavy relics: definitely not for me. I think a regular relic is fine, since it adds to the feel of the guitar (like a jeans you've been wearing for years) - but heavy relic looks is just not for me.
     
  8. diogoguitar

    diogoguitar Senior Stratmaster

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    also, if it were my money, I would just get the American Original strat, which has 90%+ of the fender custom shop vintage-correct specs for half of the price.
     
  9. White Dog

    White Dog Strat-Talker

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    Because it is fake...and I've always hated anything fake (object) and any living thing to be fake. Hope that helps!

    My answer is PASS...and get a guitar that you like and will play until it is a natural relic.

    P.S.- I'm not slamming anyone that DOES like fake relics...just merely explaining why some of us don't.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2021
  10. moozak

    moozak Strat-Talk Member

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    I love custom shop strats as well and don’t mind a little relic’ing, however I don’t typically care for heavy relic jobs. That being said, I’m not against them for those that like them... and that one looks really nice!

    I would suggest that if you have ANY reservations at all perhaps it’s not for you - might cause you to eventually have regret.
     
  11. AGK13

    AGK13 New Member!

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    You are awesome! This should keep me out of trouble for a bit. THANKS!