Cost of repainting a strat body?

Discussion in 'Stratocaster Discussion Forum' started by Blank, Jul 20, 2021.

  1. Blank

    Blank Strat-Talk Member

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    That's a really good point I didn't think about - the resale value of the current body!
     
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  2. Intune

    Intune Senior Stratmaster

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    Yeah I’m pretty sure that’s not bare wood you’re seeing unless they did a flash coat nitro version of those strats. Give it a try. I’m not trying to steer you away. It’s just not as simple as people making it out to be.
     
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  3. Blank

    Blank Strat-Talk Member

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    It is definitely bare wood! I can feel the fibers!
     
  4. Clickitysplit

    Clickitysplit Strat-Talker

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    If you’re not experienced in spray-finishing, you probably won’t find it all that easy. You won’t want to do this anywhere in your living space. It takes many coats, lots of sandpaper, and many weeks of patience if you want anything like the original finish. You’ll need to know how to handle the inevitable drip, run, sag, and foreign particle/bug that lands on it. Plenty of videos online, and it certainly can be done, but it might not be very easy.

    Here on my Bari conversion I have 3 cans of VHT epoxy white (yes, epoxy…sacrilege, but I want this finish TOUGH). Has taken 6 weeks to get here and it’ll get one more can and another couple weeks before I clear coat it.
    40B23105-824F-4BA0-9AED-956E7847C9C4.jpeg
     
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  5. J4ME5

    J4ME5 Strat-O-Master

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    I'm just thinking – in my inexperienced-but-honest view – that a good luthier, with a keen eye, should be able to clean the mess – and respray / blend / sand and polish everything up? Nitro melts into nitro – so if you removed the messiest parts, sand / prepare and then (spot) shoot the nitro, blend, sand and polish up – you (or the luthier) should be good to go? I'm sure it's not *as* easy as I'm making it sound, but I can't imagine it is beyond a skilled luthier, who is used to repairing lacquer finishes?

    I don't know... good luck though :thumb: .
     
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  6. AlexJCRandall

    AlexJCRandall Senior Stratmaster

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    Why not?? Its black and there is no wood damage. You can simply sand the affected area flat and spray the local area with black and then clearcoat over the whole guitar and buff out.

    Fender have been using non nitro based sealer/basecoats since the 60's (and maybe even the late 50's) with nitro topcoats. They're well known for it.

    Because it works together compatibility wise
    Because it seals the body more effectively both physically (as in it sinks less over time and protects better) and from a 'time efficiency for application' way.
    Because its only people on guitar forums that seem to find issue with mixing paint types
     
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  7. Blank

    Blank Strat-Talk Member

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    There is bubbling in the surrounding area not very visible in the picture as well. If it could be done and blended well, it would require sanding a large area.

    Acetone would not dissolve polyurethane, would it? The rag only had acetone in it, and I can feel the wood fibers with my fingertips and fingernails.
     
  8. AlexJCRandall

    AlexJCRandall Senior Stratmaster

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    Well, you can choose to remove a greater area (the whole guitar), or choose to remove a smaller area and re-do that with less work. Either way, you have to prep the damaged area in question exactly the same way in order to get a smooth colour coat. If you are merely wanting to have a black guitar the way you have now, then you are only creating unnecessary work for yourself by stripping the whole guitar.
    If you are wanting to make a sunburst or another transparent colour then either of these scenarios will need a complete strip down and smoothing off of all base wood. Oil would need removal of all finish layers.
     
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  9. Roger66

    Roger66 Senior Stratmaster Double Platinum Supporting Member

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    Yeah, it is. Just open a window, slap it on and sand and polish all the drips out
     
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  10. Sureshot33

    Sureshot33 Strat-Talker

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    I might be able to help you. Could you take 2 more pics of it in brighter light? One from a few feet back from that one and one close up with the bridge in the pick (like that one)?
    I'm seeing blurred edges on your photo. Maybe it's just my PC. Give it a try.
     
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  11. Olddogmike

    Olddogmike Strat-Talker

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    Seeing the damage, it would not be a hard job for an experienced auto painter to repair and blend in without having by over paint the whole body.
     
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  12. GuitaristInProgre

    GuitaristInProgre New Member!

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    For what it's worth: I've done even worse things to a sweet guitar... managed to snap the headstock clean off a '60s vintage Les Paul through sheer carelessness. (I feel no shame in admitting I cried.) That particular injury took about 6 tries over the next 10 years to fix before I finally paid to have it done right. Along the way I got to try everything from "bargain" fixes, through these a crazy luthier way out in the woods with his own way of doing things that certainly looked good at the time, and through the ultimate real solution of paying a fortune and waiting 6 months for one of the west coast's top repair shops to do it right.

    Even before learning the most expensive repair was the one that would finally hold for 20 years, I was happier having spent the money and time to get a real repair by a real pro. Trying to save money just wasn't worth it. After 6 months it came back *undetectable*. Since then, I just plunk down the cash, get it done the right way, the first time, and be done with it.
     
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  13. rolandson

    rolandson Dr. Stratster

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    I'd leave it be.
    Just as with anything else, it isn't the cost of the materials, it's the cost of the talent.

    Painting is a skill. A multifaceted skill, requiring a bunch of know-how, patience, and a suitable workspace. Read through the stuff here and then decide...
    https://www.reranch.com/basics.htm

    Then read their forum.

    Make no mistake, a person with a rattle can is able to achieve results that are indistinguishable from the factory, but that person spent a boat load of time getting to that point. It is a very rewarding pursuit, but the price of admission is the willingness to do it, then do it over, and over again, and again.

    If it were mine and I had the desire but lacked the know-how, I'd inquire of fender the cost of a factory refin. Because the resale value of your guitar is gonna take a hit...

    Do it yourself, big hit even if it's perfect.
    Factory refin, less of a hit.
    Do nothing, the least hit of them all.

    If it's truly messing with you, sure...a Stratosphere EJ body would be a solution...or an aftermarket body like Allparts or Warmoth (there are others but I don't know anything about them)...

    But seriously, the cosmetic damage is...meh. Some people actually pay extra for that.
     
  14. doublechinmask

    doublechinmask Strat-Talk Member

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    I would leave the same rag on other parts of body and call it relic.


    On serious note maybe pay some good luthier to relic it instead of refinishing it?
    Make it your special one
    Its just cosmetic and doesnt affect playability.

    Dont be too sad about it,**** happens.
     
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  15. Miotch

    Miotch Senior Stratmaster

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    If you want a beautiful guitar, buy new finished body and save that one to work on over time, or pay for refinish.
    Yes you can refinish it. And you can do it living in an apartment if you find a place outside where you can hang it on near-windless times to spray a bunch of coats. And hours of prep work and sanding. If you value your time at $15 an hour, you’ll save money by not doing it yourself.
    You’ll learn a lot. But you most of those lessons will be learned from mistakes you make. We all have made them. And there is a good chance you’ll never be satisfied in the end. On about half the guitars I’ve done, I’ve stopped, re-stripped and started over.
    So it all depends on what you want and how much time and effort you can put in it.
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2021
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  16. jvin248

    jvin248 Senior Stratmaster

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    If it's a guitar you'll likely want to resell sometime later .. find an original body in the exact color off Stratosphere/etc. Otherwise no matter what it's a 'refin' and you'll only get half the value, even if the repaint is perfectly done by a master painter.

    Find a fun sticker to slap on there and cover up the damaged area.

    Relic the rest of the body (look up Fender Custom Shop 'Heavy Relic' models for the recognized wear patterns). Pay attention to the 'peek through finishes' where they painted the body in two layers then wore back the top layer exposing some of the under-color:

    Scuff sand the existing body finish (don't try to take it 'down to wood') and rattle can over the body with the same or a different color. Do you have a balcony/patio off your apartment? Parking lot with a dumpster area that no cars park near can be useful so no over spray risks dusting cars (one guy I know painted his house with a spray gun, then had to pay to get several neighbor's cars professionally cleaned/polished). Rig up a little spray booth with plastic sheeting 'painters drop cloth' over a small wood frame made from dowels or 1x2s duct-taped or screwed at the corners or one of those closet clothing dust covers with the wire frame and plastic cover.

    Nitro is very flammable, do not spray it near potential ignition sources like hot water tank or gas stove pilot lights, apartment furnaces, smokers, typical consumer fans. Shops spraying Nitro are required to source 'explosion proof' fans.

    A guitar doesn't need to have Nitro covering it. You can paint pretty much any paint, even water based ones, over a guitar, and avoid all the safety hazards. There will be no tones lost. You'll want to do research for what paint can grip nitro. Using nitro takes weeks to cure between coats, the other paints can cure much more rapidly.

    Taking a guitar body 'down to bare wood' is a job most people dream about but then they only ever do it once because it is tedious and messy. You'll have a much better time of painting by scuffing the existing finish to key and lock in the over-coat.

    .
     
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  17. Blank

    Blank Strat-Talk Member

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    Thank you! This really made me feel better. I slept poorly thinking over and over again by this mistake I made.
     
  18. Blank

    Blank Strat-Talk Member

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    Thank you. Judging by the replies, I think maybe the picture was too kind. It looks pretty stark in person, mainly because it's not just the area where the wood is showing. There are adjoining parts where the finish (and paint?) has bubbled. It is really rough/sharp to touch. Maybe these pictures in daylight would help.
     
  19. Blank

    Blank Strat-Talk Member

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  20. Blank

    Blank Strat-Talk Member

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