Couple questions for anyone

Discussion in 'Sidewinders Bar & Grille' started by bigc, Oct 11, 2021.

  1. tery

    tery Dr. Stratster

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    Look at what there is a job market for .
     
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  2. Higgins1980

    Higgins1980 Strat-O-Master

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    Honestly if your not afraid of hard work and have a good aptitude for math look into becoming a welder or a machinist. Good pay and nobody is going into those fields. Additionally all the old timers are retiring and companies have nobody to fill the gap.
     
  3. Textele

    Textele Senior Stratmaster Silver Member

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    @bigc

    I sincerely apologize, I didn't mean for that post I made above to discourage you in any way from pursuing music.

    It did not read the way I intended it to. I was strictly thinking the business side of it.

    It's just a tough business, coming from someone who has been doing it Pro and semi-pro, for over 40 years.

    It can be done. And with the tough side of it, there are some really magical times. And if it's in your heart, you simply can't deny it.

    It doesn't need to be your primary source of income to have a blast.

    Anything can be done! :thumb:

    All the best to you, whatever you decide.
     
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  4. of this world

    of this world Senior Stratmaster

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    i'm so glad none you all were my parents... "get a cert". "work in the trades"... jeez... cant one of you side with pursuit of dreams...
     
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  5. of this world

    of this world Senior Stratmaster

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    also, there's not a damn thing wrong with getting a full education which surely doesnt happen in high school - if you think it does - it doesnt.

    knowing more is knowing more - less isnt more in this situation. having a complete education wont prevent you from getting certified in welding... and lets say you do get certified,.. then youre feaking welding all the time... what are you welding? things that make the world a better place? or oil pipelines pumping in our ruin? or some part of the war machine?

    this thread is full of arguments for the least imaginative life... way to go musicians.
     
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  6. Wayne Adams

    Wayne Adams Strat-O-Master

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    I was 32 when I decided to quit messing around and go back to school. Graduated top of my class and have now been a programmer/analyst/hardware/network/support tech for 32 years. Think I was just ready to learn. There are all kinds of grants, loans, and work-study available, but it varies with location. You need to sit down with the financial aid officer at the school you're interested in attending, and pick their brains deep. Then get on the internet and spend some time looking on your own. Apply for everything you even remotely qualify for, and some things you don't, because someone might have a surplus. And if there are any favors you can call in, don't be shy about it.
     
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  7. Wound_Up

    Wound_Up CUSTOM USER TITLE Silver Member

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    Apply for a Pell grant from the gov't. All, they can do is deny you. I used it to go back to school after my daughter passed away so I wouldn't be sitting at home all day doing nothing.

    Fill out your FAFSA info and select the check box for Pell Grants. Send it in and wait to see what they determine will be your Expected Family Contribution aka EFC. It could be as little as 0 depending on your income level.


    www.fafsa.gov
     
  8. Wound_Up

    Wound_Up CUSTOM USER TITLE Silver Member

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    I wish I had understood this in high school. It wouldve saved me a lot of wasted time.
     
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  9. Wound_Up

    Wound_Up CUSTOM USER TITLE Silver Member

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    Considering that he's asking about trades, that seems to be what to talk about. It's not that they don't believe in college. The dude asked about a trade. So they're talking about trades. Jeez.

    Seems like you're looking wayyyy too much into this or have a chip on your shoulder due to this subject already? Making something out of nothing.
     
  10. Cesspit

    Cesspit Strat-O-Master

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    Sorry to say I agree with the majority here. In the UK plumbers and electricians are the game to be in.

    However, I'd love to say pursue your dream. If I had no commitments I would have a go but it'll be tough and today most pros have to multi task to get by. Some gigs, some tuition, You Tube etc etc. I admire anyone who can make a living like that today. I guess you know this.

    I played in a semi pro band for a long time and we considered 'giving up the day jobs'. All I can say the gap and workload between semi pro and full pro is huge.
    I wish you well buddy.
     
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  11. Bob Spumoni

    Bob Spumoni Senior Stratmaster

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    Employers are struggling to find workers worth a d---n. They are offering inducements and free training for MANY jobs. In today's climate (I think generally over time), those who WANT a job get one. Those who don't don't. So get one.
     
  12. Chont

    Chont Most Honored Senior Member

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    I have a degree in audio recording. For me it paid off with some caveats. At the time I got my degree, I (fortunately correctly) sensed that the Music business was on the verge of a massive shift as recording gear got more affordable and people could set up their own home studio for a fraction of the cost. That would mean a lot less bonafide recording studios in to hit up for a Job.

    The job I did get after school was at a recording studio in Tampa FL that had an SSL 4000 in one room and ... can't remember what was in the other smaller room. They actually told me they prefer to get folks right out of highschool so they could train their way without dealing with the neurosis of kids who think they know everything coming out of audio school. But they liked me and took a chance on me.. I loved that job and stayed there a while but I knew it would be quite some time before I moved from assistant engineer to running my own sessions.

    Since audio for film was another passion and since Protools LE and similar products were bringing studios into bedrooms, I decided audio Post carried a bigger job market and a better path for employment so I made my way to NYC. I'll spare you my life story save to say for me that was a wise decision. Music studios became a lot more scarce and I was doing freelance sound editing work but eventually able to land a staff position which took the form of tech support thanks to my knack for dealing with Protools, video and audio decks and computers.

    The moral of the story ... as it applies to me and my 2 cents is research the job market before signing your life away to any student loans. I don't regret my decisions but had I known I could have just gone straight to that studio in Tampa without a degree, I might have changed the way I approached those decisions. There is a part of me that wishes I had gone to school for IT. That would have been something I could have taken anywhere.... but... I'm happy where I am now so no sense in dwelling on that.

    good luck
     
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  13. Chont

    Chont Most Honored Senior Member

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    It doesn't get much more soul crushing than trying to make it in a really tough job market while being weighed down with the heavy burden of student loans for a degree you might not be able to easily put to use. I see a lot of reality in this thread. I don't think anyone is discouraging anyone from following dreams and passions.
     
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  14. Engine Swap

    Engine Swap Strat-O-Master

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    At 22, I graduated with a completely unmarketable liberal arts degree. I held a string of low-paying jobs until I hit 30.

    Through music, I developed an interest in amps and electronics. Went back to community college and got a two-year degree in electronics systems. After 15 years in aerospace and consumer electronics, I landed a job with an audio company. Been there for 12 years.

    Would recommend a trade or community college. Lots of grants and aid available for someone in your position.
     
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  15. Chipss36

    Chipss36 Strat-O-Master

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    Learn a trade.
    learn a trade that pays real
    Money.

    do music around that.

    The current state of the music industry is , pretty much broke..

    I once made money hand over fist doing electronics repair and maintenance work for a few major studios. Still only on my spare time.
    In the best of times I could never make a
    Living at that. It’s cool, it’s interesting, I met cool people. But….

    at this point, if that all I had I would starve to death.

    I have seen very talented mix engineers with killer resumes, working as runners.
    They make zero dollars doing that…

    what’s a certified welder make again?
     
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  16. nickmsmith

    nickmsmith Dr. Stratster

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    Yep. Well put.

    I Don’t want to argue with anyone, but having gainful employment and being a musician are not mutually exclusive. And it’s not being a jerk or telling someone to quit their dreams, to recommend getting a job, when asked.

    Telling someone who is unemployed to rely solely on music as income in this day and age, considering that gigs/touring have not fully recovered from the pandemic, and the overall lack of people making a living from music... it sounds nice, but it’s not realistic advice that I would give, if someone were asking me, personally.

    especially when we don’t even know the skill level, or anything else about who we’re talking to.

    I am a weekend warrior, and I survived fine through 2020. Because I have a day job. Some friends who are full time musicians sincerely struggled. Did some virtual shows, but you can imagine it didn’t pay 1/4 of a regular gig.

    There are very few guarantees in music. The people that I know that are making a living in music have been doing it for 20+ years. Not fledgling startups. They built that reputation during a time when live music meant something. College rock, acoustic acts, young people were into it. Live music was profitable for all parties back then. And even they struggled mightily last year.

    It can happen, but I wouldn’t quite recommend that path to someone unemployed in their 30s.

    I may be a party pooper, but giving realistic advice is sometimes better than giving blind advice to a person that could be Mozart, or very much not Mozart.

    doing it is basically like starting a business. Only you are the entire product. I never gambled my entire livelihood on it, and I still get to get out and have a good time with it.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2021
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  17. nickmsmith

    nickmsmith Dr. Stratster

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    I preface this: I have a bachelor’s degree.

    Education is great. Being 21 years old and being saddled with debt that very well may follow you most of your life is not great.

    I think the importance of education is clearer than ever. People need to be able to discern BS online from a true story. But the current 4 year degree system is setting up hundreds of thousands of kids who don’t know better, into degrees that aren’t giving them real life experience or real job opportunities.

    I don’t doubt the importance of education. I doubt the requirement of burdening the youth with 50-100k of debt as some sort of narrow gateway to success.

    And colleges are gladly taking the money of these kids who aren’t cut out for it, until they drop out.

    there are colleges that give you real life skills, and take half the time and money spent. I’m all for that.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2021
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