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Earnie Ball Strings....cheap....or good quality.

Discussion in 'Sidewinders Bar & Grille' started by The-Kid, Jul 30, 2019.

  1. The-Kid

    The-Kid Most Honored Senior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

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    Balls#!#
     
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  2. problem-child

    problem-child Senior Stratmaster

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    EB for electric. Has been that way for decades now. I don't know why it's just what I found myself using. 10's by the way.

    For Acoustic steel string or classical it is typically D'Addario of some nature.

    As to quality? They both get the job done, are fairly consistent and seem to last a while. The EBs seem to have a long useful life.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2019
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  3. guitarface

    guitarface Senior Stratmaster

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    My personal preference is for d’adarrio, but EB are on the same level in terms of quality.
     
  4. s5tuart

    s5tuart Resource limit reached Strat-Talk Supporter

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    That’s been my experience too. I started using Newtone strings around 30 years ago. Any time I have to use anything else I remember why I stick with Newtone on my guitars.
     
  5. guitarface

    guitarface Senior Stratmaster

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    FWIW, and the answer is probably nothing, but EB has the best roster of celebrity endorsers.
     
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  6. lammie200

    lammie200 Strat-O-Master

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    I use EB tin plated steel trebles because I can get them individually and cheap. I use rather expensive Thomastik Infelds for the rest.
     
  7. The-Kid

    The-Kid Most Honored Senior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

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    I mean this....

    And I doubt they are in it just for the money.


    They use these strings and can use anything....but they use these.
     
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  8. Buzzgrowl

    Buzzgrowl Strat-Talk Member

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    They are good, slighty darker than Elixirs. The EB Paradigm are better. I've switched to them on all my electrics, 9-42 on Fenders and other 25.5 scale guitars.

    Used to use D'addario, normal and coated, they were ok but didn't feel as good as any EBs.
     
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  9. DeMelo

    DeMelo Strat-Talker

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    My opinion, YMMV.

    I never bought this string quality hype.

    Been using D’addarios like forever and never broke a string onstage. Not once.

    Yeah, I tried Elixirs, EBs and whatever else, but never noticed a real difference in tone.

    Elixirs might last *a bit* longer, but as a gigging player I change strings before every show or at least every set of gigs, plus they cost more.

    My own recipe is: use the string gauge that better suits you and keep the guitar with fresh strings. The rest is mostly talk.
     
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  10. Namelyguitar

    Namelyguitar Most Honored Senior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

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    The ST Archives appear to be full of positive EB comments.

    Yes, they’re keepers.
     
  11. ProSonicLive

    ProSonicLive Senior Stratmaster

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    Cant say I like Gibsons all that much. I DO like EBs (not even slinky)and cleartones, depending on what they are going on and what I am using them to play. As far as quality goes, it has been a very long time since I have broken a string, so I cant speak to that aspect.
     
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  12. kurher

    kurher Strat-Talker

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    Not really, especially compared to some European companies.
    They do have lower tension than most other strings and can be fine for a few days but the plating quality on the plain strings is usually quite poor.
    Also, they're not really cheap on most EU countries.
     
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  13. strat_strummer

    strat_strummer Most Honored Senior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

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    Ditto

    :thumb:
     
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  14. Swampash

    Swampash Senior Stratmaster

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    this
     
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  15. Funk McNasty

    Funk McNasty Strat-O-Master

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    This is exactly my experience! They are definitley darker than Elixirs (which are a little darker and more mellow than uncoated strings anyway).

    After playing the titanium coated EB’s for a few days now, I’m still undecided as to if I love em enough to switch, or use them exclusively on one particular guitar.

    I do really REAAAAALY love the feel of the EB’s though! I’ve always thought that “Super Slinky” was just a marketing tagline...like how could there really be a tension difference in the same gauge strings?? But the EB’s are noticeably easier to bend/use vibrato and have a softer feel. In terms of tension feel more compatible to the D’Addario 8.5-39 sets I use on a few of my Strats.

    I put these strings on Sunday morning and have only been playing at bedroom volumes. Band practice tonight and live gigs Friday and Saturday will be the true litmus test to see how the EB’s hold up to higher output levels and tons of sweat. (I will say: though I love D’Addario too, a set of those usually feels crusty under my fingertips ‘bout halfway through the second set of a live show... they will last weeks before that tho, with regular playing at home)




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  16. Kayden33

    Kayden33 Strat-O-Master

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    I primarily use Daddario but will at times use Ernie Ball as my second option but I haven’t tried the specific set you show.
     
  17. dirocyn

    dirocyn Senior Stratmaster

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    I've tried a lot of different strings. Seems to me the biggest differences come from:

    1. The materials the treble strings are made of. Really only 2 choices, nylon and steel.

    2. The wrap style. Round, flat, or groundwound. There is a huge difference between flats and rounds.

    3. The wrap material. Pure nickel, nickel plated steel (NPS), steel, 80/20 bronze, Phosphor bronze, and silver wraps are all available. Several of these don't work with magnetic pickups--but there's a difference audible acoustically, and for the ones that do work with mag pickups there's an audible difference electrically.

    4. The string gauge. Larger gauge means more tension means acoustically louder and more resonant (up to a point) but gauge also changes the way you play. To a certain extent you can "eq" a guitar by increasing or decreasing string gauge. Some guitars sound dull and anemic if you use strings that are too small for that guitar. It is well worth some time to experiment to find out how a guitar behaves with different string tension. You don't even have to try a bazillion sets of strings--just tune up for more tension or down for less.

    5. String age. A brand new set of 80/20 strings is super zingy and bright, in 2 days that character is much more mellow and even (and I like it better), in a few months they go dark and dull. Most all strings change their voice as they age, with some of the biggest changes happening within the first 2 days of being on the guitar.

    6. String coatings. Elixers aren't quite as bright new, but they stay bright longer. Those flatwound bass strings with teflon coating sound real different from regular bass flats, too--although I think some of those are nylon core, which is likely part of the sound difference.

    Theoretically, the wrapped string's core shape and material also makes a difference, but I suspect that's a pretty small difference. I haven't personally put a hex core string and a round core string of the same gauge onto a guitar at the same time, nor a silk core string (classical strings are usually silk core, and Silk & Steel strings have been around since the 1920s or before) next to a steel core string of the same gauge and wrap material. I would suspect they do sound different.

    If we're talking apples to apples, I don't hear any difference between brands. A .009 steel string sounds like any other .009 steel string. And Stringjoy's pure nickel wrap strings sound just like Gibson's pure nickel wrap strings of the same gauge--to my ear anyhow.

    I do prefer if my strings come in sealed packaging. I bought a set of GFS cheapy strings along with a larger order, and those arrived rusty. Don't think I'll repeat that experiment.

    I like Ernie Ball strings ok, they're nicely inexpensive and there's a pretty good variety of gauges. I like D'Addario (Pro Arte is preferred set of classical strings). Gibson's pure nickel are great if you like mellow pure nickel strings, but some of their sets have really goofy string gauges and they cost the moon. I didn't like Martin's folk strings, they feel too stretchy--but their bronze and phosphor bronze are good. I only use Elixers on a guitar I keep at my mom's house; that guitar doesn't get played much and I don't want to change strings every time I visit.

    Fender Bullets strings--I like the way they fit into the trem block on a Strat--and I like how they fit into a Gibson style stop-bar. They don't rattle or buzz, they're never hard to remove. But they'd look wrong on a top-load Tele and they wouldn't work at all on a Bigsby.

    Lately I buy strings mostly from Stringjoy because I do care about getting the right string tension, and D'Addario for classicals.
     
  18. kurher

    kurher Strat-Talker

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    There are actually quite a few more factors that make a difference in the sound, feel and performance of a string including string geometry, alloys and most importantly the quality of the raw materials. Not all steel is created equal.
     
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