Everyone said I needed one

Tratocaster

Strat-Talker
Mar 22, 2013
471
Colorado
I know what it does, I’m just not sure I can hear it doing it! Your reference to a Mediterranean spice plant have lost me……………..😀
sorry about the autocorrect..."dynamic" range.

Too many people are expecting some dramatic, grossly audible difference. Liek I said before, compression isn't going to give you dramatic results like say, a chorus, OD pedal, delay pedal, but because it's in the same form factor as every other pedal they think they're being ripped off because of the lack of an obvious change. This brings me to my original point of this...if you don't really know what the pedal is supposed to do, you aren't going to be able to appreciate what it does.

Saying you know what it does but can't hear what it's doing just means you really don't know what it does and/or how to use the pedal properly, or you're using it in a way that it's not going to be of benefit to you or your playing style, which then lead to the question being asked...why did you buy it in the first place?
 
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Ebidis

Providing the world with flat bends since 1985
Nov 14, 2013
29,805
Alabama
That's what compressors do. If you dont understand that or go to far with one, sure it's going to sound like crap, but if you're looking to smooth out transient peaks and made those quiet portions a little louder so it can be heard a little better, that's what they do.

Too many people get a compressor without even understanding what dynamic range is, crank the knobs all the way to one side or the other and say that the pedal either does nothing, or their sound is ruined and too squashed and the tone sucks now. It's supposed to be a subtle effect and one that you never even knew was applied...until you turn it off and then can hear the noticeable, but subtle difference unless you're actually going for that "pumping", compressed effect.

Compressors aren't like other pedals where you can jsut plug it in and get great sounds no matter where you set the knobs. It takes and understanding of what compression is and what the controls actually do to your sound. Kind of like the difference between driving an automatic and a manual. Everyone that can drive can drive an automatic, but not everyone knows how to drive a manual.
I know exactly what compression is, and what compressor pedals do, and I know how to use them. However, for what and how I play, I just have no use for a compressor pedal on my board.

Compression is an extremely useful tool in the studio, but studio level compression is far more advanced and versatile than any pedal. I've never met a pedal version that I like, or at least I have never found one to be necessary.
 

Tratocaster

Strat-Talker
Mar 22, 2013
471
Colorado
I know exactly what compression is, and what compressor pedals do, and I know how to use them. However, for what and how I play, I just have no use for a compressor pedal on my board.

Compression is an extremely useful tool in the studio, but studio level compression is far more advanced and versatile than any pedal. I've never met a pedal version that I like, or at least I have never found one to be necessary.
Coming from the person who says compressors "suck tone". Again, this shows you don't understand them. And we're not comparing rack mounted units with stomp box format compressors. Any compressor can ruin the sound of a signal pretty easily (aka: "suck tone" if you don't use it correctly, even your most expensive race mounted unit. Heck, just because someone owns a Fairchild, LA2A, 1176, etc., doesn't mean it's going to sound amazing if they don't understand how the controls work. Too many players think they "need" something to get them to the next level and blindly buy these things having no clue how to use them, when in reality they'd become better players and sound better if they just ignored what the inter webs tells them they need and just play more.
 

Forpie

Senior Stratmaster
Mar 24, 2019
3,055
Montréal
If you’re noodling on your own, a comp will look futile…
If you play in a band, over backing tracks or in a live environment, you will fall in love with it.
 

Wrighty

Dr. Stratster
Mar 7, 2013
11,892
Harlow, Essex, UK
It
sorry about the autocorrect..."dynamic" range.

Too many people are expecting some dramatic, grossly audible difference. Liek I said before, compression isn't going to give you dramatic results like say, a chorus, OD pedal, delay pedal, but because it's in the same form factor as every other pedal they think they're being ripped off because of the lack of an obvious change. This brings me to my original point of this...if you don't really know what the pedal is supposed to do, you aren't going to be able to appreciate what it does.

Saying you know what it does but can't hear what it's doing just means you really don't know what it does and/or how to use the pedal properly, or you're using it in a way that it's not going to be of benefit to you or your playing style, which then lead to the question being asked...why did you buy it in the first place?
It’s a circular argument. Took my whole new board along to rehearsal tonight. Awful experience, the boost pedal at the front gave a huge leap in volume with the pot fully anti-clockwise, the ‘essential’ compressor still did nothing much. The delay and OD worked reasonably but the biggest problem was that, even with every pedal switched off, they seemed to suck volume. In a small hall I had my Tonemaster twin on 8 (85 watt setting) and my 2004 Strat standard on neck and middle at 7. Never needed them that high before, ever. So, what to do? Well, the compressor’s gone, can’t be bothered. Ditch the boost too, there’s volume control on my guitar! So, delay and OD, ABY switch to change channels on the amp, and learn to use them. Through with the ritual ‘dance of the several pedals’. Your post has actually enlightened me, thanks! C0E46D24-D204-4B89-B2FE-85685377681C.jpeg
 

Tratocaster

Strat-Talker
Mar 22, 2013
471
Colorado
It

It’s a circular argument. Took my whole new board along to rehearsal tonight. Awful experience, the boost pedal at the front gave a huge leap in volume with the pot fully anti-clockwise, the ‘essential’ compressor still did nothing much. The delay and OD worked reasonably but the biggest problem was that, even with every pedal switched off, they seemed to suck volume. In a small hall I had my Tonemaster twin on 8 (85 watt setting) and my 2004 Strat standard on neck and middle at 7. Never needed them that high before, ever. So, what to do? Well, the compressor’s gone, can’t be bothered. Ditch the boost too, there’s volume control on my guitar! So, delay and OD, ABY switch to change channels on the amp, and learn to use them. Through with the ritual ‘dance of the several pedals’. Your post has actually enlightened me, thanks! View attachment 597231
Why would you put a boost in front of a compressor?!


Also, putting the delay in front of the OS-2 is "interesting", but you do you...I mean, there are no rules, but...
 
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The_Whale

Strat-O-Master
Apr 11, 2020
646
Gaithersburg, MD
It

It’s a circular argument. Took my whole new board along to rehearsal tonight. Awful experience, the boost pedal at the front gave a huge leap in volume with the pot fully anti-clockwise, the ‘essential’ compressor still did nothing much. The delay and OD worked reasonably but the biggest problem was that, even with every pedal switched off, they seemed to suck volume. In a small hall I had my Tonemaster twin on 8 (85 watt setting) and my 2004 Strat standard on neck and middle at 7. Never needed them that high before, ever. So, what to do? Well, the compressor’s gone, can’t be bothered. Ditch the boost too, there’s volume control on my guitar! So, delay and OD, ABY switch to change channels on the amp, and learn to use them. Through with the ritual ‘dance of the several pedals’. Your post has actually enlightened me, thanks! View attachment 597231


stupid.jpg
 

Wrighty

Dr. Stratster
Mar 7, 2013
11,892
Harlow, Essex, UK
OK, the saga continues. Set up my rig (such as it is) in the kitchen and went through one pedal at a time. All was well until I hit MXR boost, the result was as per my post above. But, when I isolated it completely the problem was still there, nothing to do with it’s compatibility with the rest. The other problem is that, plug in but not turned on, it actually acts as an attenuator, significantly cutting the volume. So, off equals low out put, on but turned as low as it will go, gives a volume boost to significantly higher than ‘normal’ and engaging it takes it to somewhere North if 11. I’m sure that’s not right, it’s b*****d and will be removed.
 

Bladesg

Funk Meister
Silver Member
Oct 31, 2013
3,944
Australia
Everyone likes what they like. There’s no right and wrong and even if there’s ignorance from someone who doesn’t have a use for one, who gives a s….?

I have no use for a flanger or phaser and think they suck. Am I right? Of course I am, to those that agree 🤣🤣🤣
 

telepraise

Strat-O-Master
Feb 20, 2019
747
Tampa Bay
Everyone tells you you need one. Did they mention why you need one?

If you're trying to achieve Carlos Santana levels of sustain, then yes maybe.

I concur with the post that mentioned the blend knob, it works wonders for maintaining the tone of your guitar. They seem to be found on the compressors in the $200 range. I use a Wampler Ego, but not for sustain, all my guitars sustain plenty on their own. I got it for suppressing unintended spikes when playing praise music. The attack at 12:00 handles that. Sustain is turned all the way down. Blend lives at %50 most of the time. Volume is set a bit above parity. It's first in the chain and ensures that the pedals following it have a good consistent signal to work with.

As for sucking tone, it's totally the opposite with the Ego for me. With single coils it adds a sparkle and presence to the sound that is like pixie dust. When I turn it off, the guitar sounds dull and lifeless in comparison.

If you turn up the sustain, the sound floor will come up dramatically. Be ready for hiss. The tone will be closer to a humbucker fat blob. Turning up the attack makes the compressor clamp instantly- this combined with slap back delay gets you into chickin' pickin' territory.

It's a tool that most guitar players don't need. Having more pedals in the chain that are not true bypass is going to affect your final signal.
 

3bolt79

Dr. Stratster
Oct 16, 2018
15,600
Oregon
sorry about the autocorrect..."dynamic" range.

Too many people are expecting some dramatic, grossly audible difference. Liek I said before, compression isn't going to give you dramatic results like say, a chorus, OD pedal, delay pedal, but because it's in the same form factor as every other pedal they think they're being ripped off because of the lack of an obvious change. This brings me to my original point of this...if you don't really know what the pedal is supposed to do, you aren't going to be able to appreciate what it does.

Saying you know what it does but can't hear what it's doing just means you really don't know what it does and/or how to use the pedal properly, or you're using it in a way that it's not going to be of benefit to you or your playing style, which then lead to the question being asked...why did you buy it in the first place?
I use an MXR Dyna-comp. I have three distortions and a boost in front of it. It really does tighten up the sound, especially on the lower strings.

if I turn it up all the way I get feedback, and I don’t want that. The MXR has 2 knobs. I set them at 12 O’clock. It gives me a longer sustain that is really noticeable.

I have not tried it in front of the booster and Distortions. But after the Boost/Distortions, it tends to make the bass through midrange sound tighter, less flubby.
 

3bolt79

Dr. Stratster
Oct 16, 2018
15,600
Oregon
Why would you put a boost in front of a compressor?!


Also, putting the delay in front of the OS-2 is "interesting", but you do you...I mean, there are no rules, but...

Where is the best spot to put a compressor? Before or after the dirt boxes?
 


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