Farewell and Play on

oatsoda

Puck of Paradox
Jul 10, 2011
8,922
The Shack, Nova Scotia
Maybe he was one of those guys that believes that if you close doors behind you, the monsters can’t chase you down.

We’ll give him just a bit of a head-start, then kick down the door and howl. Monsters never stop.
 

Stratafied

Dr. Stratster
Oct 29, 2019
12,809
North of South
Dear Fellow Strat Enthusiasts,

For the last couple years I have sat on the side of my bed reading through posts by the members of Strat Talk, and in recent months I have found myself more annoyed by the repeating posts and return to topics that were some of the reasons I myself joined the group originally.

I well understand the excitement of finding one of these wonders in my hands or standing in awe before one in a store (Wayne’s World). They are one of the most easily modified instruments on earth and there is a wealth of parts, advice and information available via the Internet and isles of music stores, but having come out the other end of the Strat experience, I have some thoughts I want to share:

Regardless of how hard you try, how much you practice, how much money you spend, you will never be Gilmour, Knopfler, Hendrix etc., but you will have a lot of fun along the way.

The Strat and many other guitars are the equivalent of an artist’s brush, and no artist can duplicate another’s scene. They can get close, but they’ll never be the same, ever, and that’s a good thing!

I’ve decided to leave Strat Talk, which is a good idea since I haven’t contributed anything in quite a while, but before I make my request to be removed I want to pass on some advice, and this is good advice from a guy who’s been in music over 55 years:

Buy a guitar that is better that you as quickly as you can when you begin playing, otherwise you will stall out and become frustrated. A crap guitar will do you more harm than good when you are developing your chops.

Make each note an intentional and a well-placed action. The best guitar solos can be sung; (Stairway) they are not a smattering of notes, although there is impressive technique in the guitar world, our brains actually prefer simpler solo lines.

Play with other people as often as possible. They will help you, but you’d be surprised at how much you can help them. Very important!

When you practice, don’t play the Smoke on the Water riff for 45 minutes. Ok, just once, then move on. It is a really bad habit to just jam on a phrase without an opening, verses, chorus, bridge and an ending. Learn them and teach the others in the group to have some discipline.

Anyone can learn a couple songs and play in a local bar, but don’t settle for playing in a place where everyone is an expert on sound and where you will not be respected. You will know you are there when the drunk in back still thinks yelling Freebird is funny. Additionally, if your audience has to pound beers to make the music more enjoyable, you might think about a different venue.

Tune your guitar often and don’t keep turning up your amp throughout the practice. Have some courtesy for the other group members and work to blend, not dominate. Drummers can also sit up and take note.

Take your guitar apart. Completely, except for the truss rod, string height and intonation adjustments. Save those for the next time. It’s ok to use an electric screwdriver with the correct bits to take apart your guitar, but use regular screwdrivers with the correct tips to put it back together. Take pictures of the wiring, watch videos and do not be intimidated.

There is a myth on this site that there is a sweet spot in the pickup height where the heavens open up and Utopia descends. It’s not true. It is a period of playing with a screwdriver in your back pocket and regularly tweaking them. It takes time.

Lastly, the more time you spend watching and wishing is time that could have been spent refining your skill, developing your own unique sound and style, and growing as a musician – regardless of your age. Turn off the screens, pick up your guitar and just play; you are smarter than you think and you are a better player than you think.

Ok, very lastly – Figure a way where your playing can benefit or be a blessing to others. I am big on fundraisers, but it can include church, community events and doing something you love that can help other is a win-win and always appreciated.

Now play on!
Good luck and take care.
 

Ibmorjamn

Strat-Talk Member
Jan 12, 2022
11
Oregon
Dear Fellow Strat Enthusiasts,

For the last couple years I have sat on the side of my bed reading through posts by the members of Strat Talk, and in recent months I have found myself more annoyed by the repeating posts and return to topics that were some of the reasons I myself joined the group originally.

I well understand the excitement of finding one of these wonders in my hands or standing in awe before one in a store (Wayne’s World). They are one of the most easily modified instruments on earth and there is a wealth of parts, advice and information available via the Internet and isles of music stores, but having come out the other end of the Strat experience, I have some thoughts I want to share:

Regardless of how hard you try, how much you practice, how much money you spend, you will never be Gilmour, Knopfler, Hendrix etc., but you will have a lot of fun along the way.

The Strat and many other guitars are the equivalent of an artist’s brush, and no artist can duplicate another’s scene. They can get close, but they’ll never be the same, ever, and that’s a good thing!

I’ve decided to leave Strat Talk, which is a good idea since I haven’t contributed anything in quite a while, but before I make my request to be removed I want to pass on some advice, and this is good advice from a guy who’s been in music over 55 years:

Buy a guitar that is better that you as quickly as you can when you begin playing, otherwise you will stall out and become frustrated. A crap guitar will do you more harm than good when you are developing your chops.

Make each note an intentional and a well-placed action. The best guitar solos can be sung; (Stairway) they are not a smattering of notes, although there is impressive technique in the guitar world, our brains actually prefer simpler solo lines.

Play with other people as often as possible. They will help you, but you’d be surprised at how much you can help them. Very important!

When you practice, don’t play the Smoke on the Water riff for 45 minutes. Ok, just once, then move on. It is a really bad habit to just jam on a phrase without an opening, verses, chorus, bridge and an ending. Learn them and teach the others in the group to have some discipline.

Anyone can learn a couple songs and play in a local bar, but don’t settle for playing in a place where everyone is an expert on sound and where you will not be respected. You will know you are there when the drunk in back still thinks yelling Freebird is funny. Additionally, if your audience has to pound beers to make the music more enjoyable, you might think about a different venue.

Tune your guitar often and don’t keep turning up your amp throughout the practice. Have some courtesy for the other group members and work to blend, not dominate. Drummers can also sit up and take note.

Take your guitar apart. Completely, except for the truss rod, string height and intonation adjustments. Save those for the next time. It’s ok to use an electric screwdriver with the correct bits to take apart your guitar, but use regular screwdrivers with the correct tips to put it back together. Take pictures of the wiring, watch videos and do not be intimidated.

There is a myth on this site that there is a sweet spot in the pickup height where the heavens open up and Utopia descends. It’s not true. It is a period of playing with a screwdriver in your back pocket and regularly tweaking them. It takes time.

Lastly, the more time you spend watching and wishing is time that could have been spent refining your skill, developing your own unique sound and style, and growing as a musician – regardless of your age. Turn off the screens, pick up your guitar and just play; you are smarter than you think and you are a better player than you think.

Ok, very lastly – Figure a way where your playing can benefit or be a blessing to others. I am big on fundraisers, but it can include church, community events and doing something you love that can help other is a win-win and always appreciated.

Now play on!
Well constructed post , I am to new here to know your posts. I have been on another forum for 10 years and I get why you are leaving.
Kind of why I am here.

I know why you want to delete your account as well. I have not come to that yet.
Good inspirations you are leaving with.
 

Oldboy

Senior Stratmaster
May 17, 2009
1,559
Land Of 1000 Dances
For the last couple years I have sat on the side of my bed reading through posts by the members of Strat Talk, and in recent months I have found myself more annoyed by the repeating posts and return to topics that were some of the reasons I myself joined the group originally.

angry-user-screaming-to-laptop-angry-user-screaming-to-laptop-aggressive-man-working-notebook-office-133814226.jpg
 

tanta07

Senior Stratmaster
Feb 28, 2019
2,196
Colorado
Why does everyone think they can be "removed" from the site when they want to announce their departure?
 

Attachments

  • tenor (1).gif
    tenor (1).gif
    311.5 KB · Views: 5

Leofender

Plink... Need a restring!!
Silver Member
Aug 28, 2021
2,433
Australia
OH... ALRIGHT...
Best wishes, and thanks for the advice... (I'm pretty sure) the tone of your rarified post is a BIG raspberry to ST and MEMBERS... seems to be a thing NOW!

Accordingly, certainly the advice IMO WAS not worth the 9 years wait.
 


Top