Fender Newporter Bridge Pins

Ian Ashdown

Strat-O-Master
Apr 16, 2019
844
San Clemente, CA
I just changed the strings on my Fender Newporter Classic for the first time. I fit a set of Elixir’s which I hope will reduce the noise of sliding on the string. I hate that noise! I need to improve my technique, I know . . .

When I came to fit the new strings, the Bridge Pins bottomed out, but not in the taper. It seems like holes are just a touch too big. I did manage to get all six to stay in place as the strings were tightened, and so for they are holding although I can’t think why!

How should these pins fit? Does this sound correct? Are slightly oversize pins available?

Sure does sound nice with some nice new strings!

Ian
SoCal
 

stormin1155

Strat-O-Master
Mar 18, 2014
551
Iowa
A secure fit is important, not only so your strings don't pop out, but for optimum transfer of vibrations from the string to the sound board. Different size and taper pins are available, but without knowing what you need... Over time, your holes may have enlarged due to wear. One thing you might try is using non-slotted pins (a quick hack would be to turn your pins backwards so the string doesn't rest in the channel). A good tech/luthier would be able to determine the correct pins for you or possibly fill and re-drill the holes so that the pins fit properly.
 

Ian Ashdown

Strat-O-Master
Apr 16, 2019
844
San Clemente, CA
A secure fit is important, not only so your strings don't pop out, but for optimum transfer of vibrations from the string to the sound board. Different size and taper pins are available, but without knowing what you need... Over time, your holes may have enlarged due to wear. One thing you might try is using non-slotted pins (a quick hack would be to turn your pins backwards so the string doesn't rest in the channel). A good tech/luthier would be able to determine the correct pins for you or possibly fill and re-drill the holes so that the pins fit properly.

The strange/sad thing is the guitar is fairly new and this was it’s first string change. It tuned up OK and nothing popped out overnight, but I confess to not feeling confident. I suppose the old strings stayed put from the time I bought the guitar to now . . .

Ian
SoCal
 

Scott Baxendale

Most Honored Senior Member
Gold Supporting Member
May 20, 2020
5,565
Sante Fe, NM
I just changed the strings on my Fender Newporter Classic for the first time. I fit a set of Elixir’s which I hope will reduce the noise of sliding on the string. I hate that noise! I need to improve my technique, I know . . .

When I came to fit the new strings, the Bridge Pins bottomed out, but not in the taper. It seems like holes are just a touch too big. I did manage to get all six to stay in place as the strings were tightened, and so for they are holding although I can’t think why!

How should these pins fit? Does this sound correct? Are slightly oversize pins available?

Sure does sound nice with some nice new strings!

Ian
SoCal
Bridge pin holes and how the pins are supposed to fit is done completely wrong on most newer and cheaper 1CD32AD2-74B6-4A33-9952-DBFB468F4097.jpeg 56CDE884-7293-47DB-A95D-0491151C9EF2.jpeg 314C6E66-9A67-4D5E-AD70-9ED3B2214E0F.jpeg 7A018329-062A-4844-9AD3-596D8C3847C3.jpeg guitars.

The bridge pin hole should look like a key hole and the string should have a soft ramp cut into the string slot so it doesn’t kink where it goes into the bridge. The notch in the key hole should hold the string so the ball end hooks under the bridge plate. Theoretically, if these are cut correctly you should be able to tune the guitar up and remove the bridge pins and the strings will stay hooked to the bridge plate. This said the pins should not fit real tight.
 

Boneman68

Strat-O-Master
Platinum Supporting Member
Apr 12, 2021
520
CA
Mr. Baxendale bringing science(another post) and now sketches to the forum! I love it, and thank you for your wisdom as always, the forum is lucky to have you.

Do I recall you saying 40 year old guitars won’t really have any problems with humidity levels as they would be fully cured by now so to speak? Or is a real high or low humidity always going to be a concern throughout a guitar’s life?
 

Gedster

Strat-Talker
May 11, 2021
147
NSW Australia
I just changed the strings on my Fender Newporter Classic for the first time. I fit a set of Elixir’s which I hope will reduce the noise of sliding on the string. I hate that noise! I need to improve my technique, I know . . .

When I came to fit the new strings, the Bridge Pins bottomed out, but not in the taper. It seems like holes are just a touch too big. I did manage to get all six to stay in place as the strings were tightened, and so for they are holding although I can’t think why!

How should these pins fit? Does this sound correct? Are slightly oversize pins available?

Sure does sound nice with some nice new strings!

Ian
SoCal

Scott has provided the complete answer there for you Ian. As @Boneman68 has said, we’re lucky to have him here.

I’ve got a (Player series) Newporter that I’ve been playing for the last 12 months (in preference to some very nice acoustics that I have) and I’m very fond of it! I’m sure the Classic version would be even nicer.

I was just looking at the bridge on my guitar and those bridge pins are quite a long way recessed into the bridge holes. Like, at least a quarter of the depth of the ball. As Scott suggested, they shouldn’t be a real tight fit in the taper, but these appear to sit a little below the top of the bridge. Just make sure they’re sitting all the way home., without pushing them too hard.

9DE45312-C715-43E0-93D0-FD5C7F5DD4BE.jpeg
 

Ian Ashdown

Strat-O-Master
Apr 16, 2019
844
San Clemente, CA
Bridge pin holes and how the pins are supposed to fit is done completely wrong on most newer and cheaper View attachment 499661 View attachment 499662 View attachment 499663 View attachment 499664 guitars.

The bridge pin hole should look like a key hole and the string should have a soft ramp cut into the string slot so it doesn’t kink where it goes into the bridge. The notch in the key hole should hold the string so the ball end hooks under the bridge plate. Theoretically, if these are cut correctly you should be able to tune the guitar up and remove the bridge pins and the strings will stay hooked to the bridge plate. This said the pins should not fit real tight.

Thank you for this insight. I suspected that the ferrule sat up under the bridge and the pin didn’t really stop it pulling upwards, but held it under the bridge. I was going to take a photo to confirm this, but now no need!

I like the lead for the string in the bridge, mine doesn’t have anything like that, but I think I might file a bit of relief in that area with some nut files.

Thanks again,

Ian
SoCal
 

Scott Baxendale

Most Honored Senior Member
Gold Supporting Member
May 20, 2020
5,565
Sante Fe, NM
Mr. Baxendale bringing science(another post) and now sketches to the forum! I love it, and thank you for your wisdom as always, the forum is lucky to have you.

Do I recall you saying 40 year old guitars won’t really have any problems with humidity levels as they would be fully cured by now so to speak? Or is a real high or low humidity always going to be a concern throughout a guitar’s life?
Yes, a 40 plus year old acoustic guitar has naturally torrefied wood which is stabilized so it’s much less affected by humidity changes. You can call me Scott. My dad was Mr….lol
 

Boneman68

Strat-O-Master
Platinum Supporting Member
Apr 12, 2021
520
CA
Yes, a 40 plus year old acoustic guitar has naturally torrefied wood which is stabilized so it’s much less affected by humidity changes. You can call me Scott. My dad was Mr….lol
Ahh, Ok then my brain cells aren’t all fried, lol, I thought I had read that once. Awesome, thanks again, and Scott it is. :thumb:
 

Ian Ashdown

Strat-O-Master
Apr 16, 2019
844
San Clemente, CA
Yes, a 40 plus year old acoustic guitar has naturally torrefied wood which is stabilized so it’s much less affected by humidity changes. You can call me Scott. My dad was Mr….lol

That would account for why my 40+ year old inexpensive Yamaha Classical guitar is steady as a rock tuning wise and sounds better than many 3-4 times the price!

Thank you for your knowledge!

Ian
SoCal
 

Scott Baxendale

Most Honored Senior Member
Gold Supporting Member
May 20, 2020
5,565
Sante Fe, NM
That would account for why my 40+ year old inexpensive Yamaha Classical guitar is steady as a rock tuning wise and sounds better than many 3-4 times the price!

Thank you for your knowledge!

Ian
SoCal
That is not the only reason. Yamaha’s, especially the older Japanese models, are one of the best inexpensive guitars ever made and it has everything to do with their design. Their superior design has stood the test of time against all other models in its price point.
 

Ian Ashdown

Strat-O-Master
Apr 16, 2019
844
San Clemente, CA
Here is a shot inside the Fender Newporter showing the position of the string ferrules. It confirm that the pins hold the ferrules under the bridge pad and do not carry any of the string tension.

Ian
SoCal
509694E3-53C1-4CED-9A4A-2E6E9AF57DBF.jpeg
 


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