Help with Microphone

Eric_G

Senior Stratmaster
Jan 10, 2021
2,835
Quebec
I've been thinking of purchasing a microphone to record an amp and use as an input in a DAW. I'm not looking for high end studio quality, just a little something that would allow a good recording and to have some fun. I'm assuming that this can be done in the 75$US range, but I may be dreaming...

Any recommendation for a mic at an affordable price as a starting tool ?
 

Stu78

Senior Stratmaster
Apr 20, 2019
1,912
Scotland

Eric_G

Senior Stratmaster
Jan 10, 2021
2,835
Quebec
So if I understood the article, the SM57 is a better amp mic that can do voice and the SM58 is a better voice mic that can do amp...

One question tho, they are both unidirectional, so does this mean I would need a stand or can it just hang from above the amp ? In other words not directly pointing at the amp.
 

Stu78

Senior Stratmaster
Apr 20, 2019
1,912
Scotland
So if I understood the article, the SM57 is a better amp mic that can do voice and the SM58 is a better voice mic that can do amp...

One question tho, they are both unidirectional, so does this mean I would need a stand or can it just hang from above the amp ? In other words not directly pointing at the amp.
Well, kind of yeah. The caveat with the SM58 is that it will only do for recording SMALL amps. I would never stick one in front of a large cab. Can't handle the pressure. You would need a stand for both IMO.
 

dspellman

Senior Stratmaster
Mar 24, 2013
1,026
Los Angeles
So if I understood the article, the SM57 is a better amp mic that can do voice and the SM58 is a better voice mic that can do amp...

One question tho, they are both unidirectional, so does this mean I would need a stand or can it just hang from above the amp ? In other words not directly pointing at the amp.
They're cardioid microphones, so better pointing at the amp. I use a 57 for close miking, which means I select just one speaker and put it close in. Most folks listen to see where the best spot is on the cone, just outside of the center cap. You'll see some sound guys and/or guitarists put a small square of tape on the grill cloth to indicate the best location. Saves time and lets you know instantly if someone's kicked it out of place.
 

Eric_G

Senior Stratmaster
Jan 10, 2021
2,835
Quebec
Well, kind of yeah. The caveat with the SM58 is that it will only do for recording SMALL amps. I would never stick one in front of a large cab. Can't handle the pressure. You would need a stand for both IMO.

Ok so as primarily I'm thinking amp, SM57 would work best. From what you said, I understand that a SM59 in front of my Hot Rod Deville cranked to breaking point will not be happy.

They're cardioid microphones, so better pointing at the amp. I use a 57 for close miking, which means I select just one speaker and put it close in. Most folks listen to see where the best spot is on the cone, just outside of the center cap. You'll see some sound guys and/or guitarists put a small square of tape on the grill cloth to indicate the best location. Saves time and lets you know instantly if someone's kicked it out of place.

OK so I will definitely need a stand, my tab is increasing slowly :D
 

Deafsoundguy

CERTIFIED HACK
Silver Member
Mar 6, 2020
1,912
Area 51
Wow, some real off the wall info here…..
Okay dudes a SM57 and a SM58 are the SAME mic! The only difference is that one has a ball screen to act like a pop filter (the screen forcing your mouth a certain distance from the cartridge). Shure had to make the change so guys didn’t wrap their lips around the flimsy-ass SM57 cap. Once you wrap your mouth around the cap it defeats the anti-feedback ports going down the side of the mic side. Plus, the proximity effect becomes massive and stupid when singing hard into a SM57. Therefore, the SM57 should always be an instrument general purpose mic, and never a vocal mic (unless you sing off of it by a few inches). The SM58 can be anything. SAME MIC (element).

For recording remember that those mics add about a 6db presence peak centered around 5 or 6K. So youre adding a lot of highs and those mics aren’t designed to amplify low stuff. Those mics are good “general purpose“ mics. There‘s way better but everyone has their opinions and what you’re miking depends on what you should be using.

If you’re NOT focused on recording vocals with said mic, you should think about a condenser mic. Like a used Audio Technica Pro37R for example. Excellent mic for the money, even sound great on pianos. Way better low frequency response and transients. I’ve turned a lot of bands and sound guys onto those mics. Also, a used Audio-Technica AE3300 or AE 5400 can be used as excellent vocal mics or for pretty much anything. Highly recommended

Oh BTW, I‘ve miked a million LOUD cabinets with SM57/58’s as well as a million other sound guys. They can take the pressure. :thumb:
 

Jimbo99

Senior Stratmaster
Jun 5, 2021
2,306
Palm Coast, FL
If affordability is the criteria, you won't be disappointed with one of these. I have the Pyle Pro, it was $ 13, came with a 16 foot mic cable and clip. Does exactly what any Shure SM57 does pretty much. I can buy 8 of them for what an SM57 MSRP is. Advantage(s) ? What if I need more than 1 microphone ? Backup microphones ? I'm not shut down, if the SM57 is flaky or outright fails. A spare tire has a purpose, spare microphone does as well. Kids ? We all know any child has friends, everyone gets a micrphone to sing along karaoke. Everyone is happy, except for perhaps anyone listening to the chatter ?

 
Last edited:

Scott Baxendale

Most Honored Senior Member
Gold Supporting Member
May 20, 2020
5,567
Sante Fe, NM
I've been thinking of purchasing a microphone to record an amp and use as an input in a DAW. I'm not looking for high end studio quality, just a little something that would allow a good recording and to have some fun. I'm assuming that this can be done in the 75$US range, but I may be dreaming...

Any recommendation for a mic at an affordable price as a starting tool ?
Shure SM57 is the only choice at this price point.
 

Baelzebub

Dr. Stratster
Nov 1, 2019
14,802
State of Disbelief
Wow, some real off the wall info here…..
Okay dudes a SM57 and a SM58 are the SAME mic! The only difference is that one has a ball screen to act like a pop filter (the screen forcing your mouth a certain distance from the cartridge). Shure had to make the change so guys didn’t wrap their lips around the flimsy-ass SM57 cap. Once you wrap your mouth around the cap it defeats the anti-feedback ports going down the side of the mic side. Plus, the proximity effect becomes massive and stupid when singing hard into a SM57. Therefore, the SM57 should always be an instrument general purpose mic, and never a vocal mic (unless you sing off of it by a few inches). The SM58 can be anything. SAME MIC (element).

For recording remember that those mics add about a 6db presence peak centered around 5 or 6K. So youre adding a lot of highs and those mics aren’t designed to amplify low stuff. Those mics are good “general purpose“ mics. There‘s way better but everyone has their opinions and what you’re miking depends on what you should be using.

If you’re NOT focused on recording vocals with said mic, you should think about a condenser mic. Like a used Audio Technica Pro37R for example. Excellent mic for the money, even sound great on pianos. Way better low frequency response and transients. I’ve turned a lot of bands and sound guys onto those mics. Also, a used Audio-Technica AE3300 or AE 5400 can be used as excellent vocal mics or for pretty much anything. Highly recommended

Oh BTW, I‘ve miked a million LOUD cabinets with SM57/58’s as well as a million other sound guys. They can take the pressure. :thumb:
Thanks for this post. I learned quite a bit from it that's particularly relevant, even though I don't do any mic'ing or recording as such, (yet, anyway), but because I was just exploring the system upgrade V2 for my Katana 100 MKII.

One of the new features added was an expansion of the Line Out setting option so that in addition the Air Feel settings of "Live/Rec/Blend" they've included two customizable options which allow selection of Mic Type, Distance (2-20 cm) and Postion (2-10cm).

Mic types include a CND451, CND87, RBN 121, DYN57, and DYN421.

Since I know squat about mic'ing and recording I was excited to see this, as it will allow me to experiment with these different settings to learn a bit about it without having to invest a ton in the relevant equipment, take up more space in an already crowded practice space, or have to physically manipulate the equipment.

Now, I know it's probably not the same, but for someone starting out on that avenue, on a budget, or who will actually have very limited opportunities to use these things, but is interested in how it all work, it's an incredible learning tool. I'd love to hear your thoughts on it.
 


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