How bad is this Stratocaster neck bend?

Discussion in 'Stratocaster Discussion Forum' started by franblanc, May 25, 2021.

  1. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Most Honored Senior Member

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    back the nut all the way out and put a dab of oil on the back side.. sometimes they get corroded or a bit of rust will invade.. that increases the friction between the nut and the washers considerably..

    r
     
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  2. Intune

    Intune Senior Stratmaster

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    I like that saying “greedy action”. That’s what I do though. Pretty much zero relief and action as low as possible without buzz/rattle. I go by eye and not specific numbers other than the final action height at the 17th fret for each saddle.

    @franblanc after you get the relief set I’d get those strings off and properly install a new set. The wrap around the low E looks pretty intense
     
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  3. franblanc

    franblanc Strat-Talk Member

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    Thanks for the suggestion. Yes the neck has 22 frets. I checked the neck pocket as you suggested. The neck was mated to the body in the factory in 1992 and seems like a snug fit and it has never been removed since. The pickguard does not rub on the underside. There is a tiny gap approximately 0.5mm but it is there.

    I checked the relief at the eighth fret using a spark plug feeler gauge and a capo on the first position. It's measured in millimeters but 0.25 mm is equal to the recommended relief 0.010 inches. I used the Fender page here which has the measurements for a 9.5 inch radius neck.

    https://www.fender.com/articles/how-to/how-to-measure-neck-relief-on-guitar-or-bass

    The bass E string is spot on, somehow I fluked a sweet spot. The treble string is less than 0.25 mm but it's fractional and I can live with it. I am going to leave the truss rod alone now as the action has gone down to a comfortable level and I can manage my arpeggios a bit better in the ninth position. I know that if I mess with the truss rod I will break it and ruin the guitar. I will check it again in a couple of weeks and take stock. Thanks to everyone for all the good advice.
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2021
  4. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Most Honored Senior Member

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    then I would level the frets or have them leveled.. That will remove the "ski jump" and get it sorted and ready for a good setup..

    r
     
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  5. Fenderbaum

    Fenderbaum Strat-O-Master

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    Here is my strat.. Basically this is how much relief you should have for a normal setup. You are not able to see a bow when aiming your eye downward the neck.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2021
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  6. Archtops

    Archtops Strat-Talker

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    All necks need a slight bit of relief (bend) at the 12th fret.
     
  7. Maplelover

    Maplelover Strat-Talker

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    Onlyest thing to do , make a hurley
     
  8. StratUp

    StratUp Senior Stratmaster

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    The bow is made from wood layers intended to bend. A neck is made to generally stay stiff. Big difference.

    I'll agree that most of the movement is while you move the wrench, but the neck will settle to that position over time and stop fighting it. Or sometimes it fights back a little. If you need to move more than it wants to, you can let it settle and them move it some more. Or use the "lean on it" method that horrifies many.

    Either way the bottom line is the same: Set it to where you think it should be; play it for a few days; see if you need more adjustments.