How much is this strat worth?

CB91710

No GAS shortage here
Double Platinum Supporting Member
Feb 24, 2019
10,860
SoCal
i think i will be buying newer custom then some old strat....if the price will not go up significantly
If you are LUCKY, the price of the '77 will keep pace with inflation.

Note that, it originally sold for $600.
And keeping pace with inflation puts it at around $2800 today, so the asking price at $3100 is already $300 over the inflated price.
Chances are good that it will drop back and MAYBE keep pace with inflation over the next 10 years.

The Custom Shop model? Unless you can get a good deal on one used, it will NEVER match inflation for the cost when new.
Custom Shop guitars are like new cars.... they lose half their value as soon as you write the check.
 

Ebidis

Providing the world with flat bends since 1985
Nov 14, 2013
29,128
Alabama
Ok, people. If you blow up the image, it appears that the sticker on the headstock is a clear decal. That's why you can still see the STRATOCASTER logo. Not a big mystery really.

That looks like a totally legit '77 Strat to me. Just that some idiot put a stupid sticker on the headstock.
 

Ebidis

Providing the world with flat bends since 1985
Nov 14, 2013
29,128
Alabama

fenderjack

Strat-Talker
Dec 6, 2016
132
london
and the seller is weird...i asked him 5 times if the wiener sticker can be removed....i did not get a clear answer.....so is the sticker burned in the color? if it wouod be easy to remove the owner would already do it I think....what a moron
 

somebodyelseuk

Strat-O-Master
Jan 29, 2022
692
Birmingham UK
The area under the sticker is lighter than the rest because it's probably been there from new. Fender finished the necks in poly, but it reacted adversely with the logo transfer, so they nitroed the heads. The nitro darkens , because of air oxidation, not uv light, hence the bit under sticker didn't darken. You find the maple board models, like mine, have darker heads and light boards - unless the board is refinished in nitro when it's refretted.

I'm not seeing anything to suggest it's not original, but if you're not comfortable with it, move on. There's plenty around.

By the way, the going rate in the UK at the moment seems to be between £1500-2500.

My advice. Try these people - https://www.vintageandrareguitars.com/collections/fender-electric-guitars
They know their stuff.
 
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Jimbo99

Senior Stratmaster
Jun 5, 2021
2,303
Palm Coast, FL
Those saddles look like the saddles on my 2005 Squier Bullet SSS HT. Uggghhhh, gonna have to clean the cheese off them. Nasty like toe jam.

IMAG0461.jpg

IMAG0458.jpg
 

Jimbo99

Senior Stratmaster
Jun 5, 2021
2,303
Palm Coast, FL
Those are the kind of saddles that came on '70s era 3 bolt Strats.
I just thought they were cast & chromed fixed bridge top loader saddles that were trying to be styled after the bent steel saddles. I don't know that with the feet post screws that they came with that they could ever be attached to the intonation screws of a tremolo bridge plate, as low as they drill those holes without a lot of the screw sticking out of the top of the saddles.
 

Cerb

Anti conformist reformist
Jan 22, 2016
15,162
Sweden
I just thought they were cast & chromed fixed bridge top loader saddles that were trying to be styled after the bent steel saddles. I don't know that with the feet post screws that they came with that they could ever be attached to the intonation screws of a tremolo bridge plate, as low as they drill those holes without a lot of the screw sticking out of the top of the saddles.
a0FuPjiLZev4c.gif
 

Ebidis

Providing the world with flat bends since 1985
Nov 14, 2013
29,128
Alabama
I just thought they were cast & chromed fixed bridge top loader saddles that were trying to be styled after the bent steel saddles. I don't know that with the feet post screws that they came with that they could ever be attached to the intonation screws of a tremolo bridge plate, as low as they drill those holes without a lot of the screw sticking out of the top of the saddles.
The '70s Strat bridges were very different from the pre CBS units.

The whole unit, plate and block, were cast as one piece from pot metal, and they had the cast block saddles.

That was one of the reasons why this era of Strats was looked at as inferior to earlier guitars.
 

Jimbo99

Senior Stratmaster
Jun 5, 2021
2,303
Palm Coast, FL
See the E saddles, to get low action, the top of the screws stick up thru the top of the saddles on this 1970's Fender. Even the other 4 have less, but still sharp metal screws sticking up. On the top loader Squier Bullet, where the intonation screws would be for a tremolo bridge plate, is where the strings ball ends feed and the intonation screws are drilled higher. I ended up shimming the neck heel & raising the pickups to get the all the parts to be level, no screw tips sticking up and still get low action over the fretboard from nut to heel.

IMAG0459.jpg

1656067175859.png
 
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FuncleManson

Strat-Talker
May 23, 2021
434
Moline, IL
why are guitar bad investments? If you have a fender 65 it would be worth fortune today.... why is the 1977 strat better than the standard elite strat today, i mean the technology has improved...how can it be better?

Not all guitars are "bad" investments, but NONE are exceptional (I'm talking electrics) and it's hard to guess which ones will be good. Here's some food for thought that I posted on a different thread a couple weeks ago.

"Take the "gold standard" of appreciating guitars--the '59 Gibson Les Paul. I think they were $265 new and let's use a nice round value of $250,000 today. That's an annual return of about 11.5%, which is very good, but there are a lot of stocks that have outperformed that over a similar time frame and, according to Investopedia, the S&P 500 has averaged 10.5% since 1957."

So, you might think a '65 Strat would be worth a "fortune" today, but that same money invested in an S&P 500 index fund would be worth considerably more and invested in, say, Berkshire Hathaway? o_O
 

somebodyelseuk

Strat-O-Master
Jan 29, 2022
692
Birmingham UK
Not all guitars are "bad" investments, but NONE are exceptional (I'm talking electrics) and it's hard to guess which ones will be good. Here's some food for thought that I posted on a different thread a couple weeks ago.

"Take the "gold standard" of appreciating guitars--the '59 Gibson Les Paul. I think they were $265 new and let's use a nice round value of $250,000 today. That's an annual return of about 11.5%, which is very good, but there are a lot of stocks that have outperformed that over a similar time frame and, according to Investopedia, the S&P 500 has averaged 10.5% since 1957."

So, you might think a '65 Strat would be worth a "fortune" today, but that same money invested in an S&P 500 index fund would be worth considerably more and invested in, say, Berkshire Hathaway? o_O
Yup...
... and unless you are one off the lucky punters who bought a 'burst' when they were relatively cheap, you missed the boat.
Even 'bursts' haven't increased significantly in value over the last 15 years. The days of paying 'secondhand car' money for a guitar and it being worth more than a house in 50 years are over.
 

HSH Classic Vibe

Strat-Talker
May 29, 2022
308
Republic of Squierland
This is how the Strat looked in the 1976 Fender catalog.
2.png
3.png

If I were investing in vintage Strats, the 70s models with the 3 bolt necks are something I'd avoid as I can't imagine any generation will get teary-eyed nostalgic for them. And I'm a child of the 70s. But investing in guitars is a fool's game. My advice? Buy an instrument that you will enjoy owning, playing. Never consider what it's resale value might be unless you are always looking for rent money and know that you won't own it for long.
 


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