I fried my TS9. Help!

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Hanaywhat

Strat-Talker
Mar 23, 2022
461
Vancouver Island
Gees...

If we'd all just put in $1 for each post here we'd have bought the OP a new TS9 - and a night on the town.
View attachment 573294
The OP was told to buy a new pedal but he didn't listen. Instead its taken a month for him to place an order for a diode he could have pulled out of literally any old electronic he has laying around. Maybe he will get the part in August and then we can start debating on which soldering iron he should buy.
 

dbb541

Senior Stratmaster
Oct 14, 2010
1,434
Eugene
The OP was told to buy a new pedal but he didn't listen. Instead its taken a month for him to place an order for a diode he could have pulled out of literally any old electronic he has laying around. Maybe he will get the part in August and then we can start debating on which soldering iron he should buy.”
Damn dude! I googled hanaywhat. Don’t do it people 😂.
 

dbb541

Senior Stratmaster
Oct 14, 2010
1,434
Eugene
Bad news, I installed the diode and the pedal does not work. The pedal light does come on and I can play through it but when I click the pedal, no more sound. Well actually I can hear a little slight static sound when I turn the level nob up on the pedal. I looked over the board and am not seeing anything that looks obviously defective. This is probably as far as I'm going to take it, I'm just too busy and need to focus on my real passion, inventing new thermostats. Thanks for all of your help, this has been an interesting thread.
 

Matopotato

Strat-Talker
Apr 11, 2021
117
Sweden
As a non-TS9 owner I would have liked to troubleshoot it. If nothing else but to keep this thread rolling. Could become a book in the end. "Fried green pedal at someotherstop café" or "The little green itch that wouldn't go away", a childrens book to make sure they get GAS early enough to be able to set a new WR in pedals some years ahead.
Unfortunately I live in Europe so I'll just have to buy my own eventually.
 

Eric_G

Senior Stratmaster
Jan 10, 2021
2,834
Quebec
As a non-TS9 owner I would have liked to troubleshoot it. If nothing else but to keep this thread rolling. Could become a book in the end. "Fried green pedal at someotherstop café" or "The little green itch that wouldn't go away", a childrens book to make sure they get GAS early enough to be able to set a new WR in pedals some years ahead.
Unfortunately I live in Europe so I'll just have to buy my own eventually.
I connected with @dbb541, if he ships it, I'll get it working... I hope.

May not bring it back to this thread, but I could put a troubleshooting report once I'm done...
 

SAguitar

Senior Stratmaster
Jun 28, 2014
2,186
Oregon
An early 70’s TS-9 ?
I thought that series of pedals started in ‘81.
OK, I just checked and you of course are right. I must have bought this stomper in the early '80s. It has rocked for a good long time, and now I have a new TS9 to carry on the tradition.
 

Matopotato

Strat-Talker
Apr 11, 2021
117
Sweden
If the Zener is there to regulate input voltage to a predictable 9V (9.1?) so the rest of the circuit can go on and divide. And you apply say 9.5 or 10V. Then the Zener shunts to ground the excess, right? So be it 9.5 or 10, it still results in 9V/9.1V on (at?) the rails?
I understand that there is probably no fixed limit to this, so having a wall wart of 9.5V will work also over time. Having 18V applied (with +/- "intact"), the diode would have more to do. And I am assuming that over time it would break. And if not 18, then higher.
So can one say that when intended as a regulator, it has a protective function for over-power (over-voltage) as well? Sort of a fringe result/both aspects intertwined and useful concept?
 

Eric_G

Senior Stratmaster
Jan 10, 2021
2,834
Quebec
So the zener diode acts as a 9 volt regulator and does not protect against reverse polarity? Who knew?
Voltage regulator yes, but what I mainly disagree with you on the subject was when you stated this:
If it were a protection diode he wouldn't have fried his pedal. That zener diode is used as a voltage divider to send 4.5 to the rail and it wants 9 volts not 12. It's likely that other components are damaged as well.

The zener is definitely not use as a voltage divider…

Mea Culpa, I also didn’t know about zener diode for voltage regulation. But it’s all good, I owe you for inventing my wife ! :sneaky:
 

Derrick

Strat-Talk Member
Mar 23, 2020
88
MD/VA/DC metro
OK, I just checked and you of course are right. I must have bought this stomper in the early '80s. It has rocked for a good long time, and now I have a new TS9 to carry on the tradition.
Keep in mind that the original early-mid 80s TS-808 and TS9 Tubescreamers are very collectable and valuble pedals now in almost any condition. If you have a noriginal and now have replaced it... don't just throw the original away. Someone wants that original!
 

Eric_G

Senior Stratmaster
Jan 10, 2021
2,834
Quebec
If the Zener is there to regulate input voltage to a predictable 9V (9.1?) so the rest of the circuit can go on and divide. And you apply say 9.5 or 10V. Then the Zener shunts to ground the excess, right? So be it 9.5 or 10, it still results in 9V/9.1V on (at?) the rails?
I understand that there is probably no fixed limit to this, so having a wall wart of 9.5V will work also over time. Having 18V applied (with +/- "intact"), the diode would have more to do. And I am assuming that over time it would break. And if not 18, then higher.
So can one say that when intended as a regulator, it has a protective function for over-power (over-voltage) as well? Sort of a fringe result/both aspects intertwined and useful concept?
The more I look at the power supply circuit, the more I learn and the more I realized it seems poorly designed.

First, regardless if the zener was meant for reverse polarity or not, the circuit doesn't provide reliable reverse polarity protection. As pointed out, it would shunt the reverse power, but only for the duration of the zener life under such high current load. If that‘s enough to allow a user to realize that the power used is wrong and disconnect it on time seems very unlikely.

Second, after reading and learning about zener diode power regulation circuit, there seems to be a missing resistor before the zener to offer a load in the event of overload. In your example, in the event that a load is applied that exceeds the max capacity of the zener, it would fry the zener and then supply overload to the rest of the circuit. However, it might be that the W03C has a max forward load way above normal mistake condition.

I’m hoping to find some time and breadboard this circuit to understand it better….

If I get the TS9 from @dbb541, I will definitely mod it and add a Schottky diode in-line at the power source to fix the reverse polarity issue.
 
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