I fried my TS9. Help!

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the dark sailor

Senior Stratmaster
Dec 18, 2008
1,361
south jersey
If you switch out the diode, which i believe and a few others have mentioned is the problem, i had the same issue also with a MS-10, easy fix. Just be sure to put it in the correct direction. Take a pic of the OG before pulling it out of the circuit.
 

LedZepconcertvet

Strat-Talker
Jan 23, 2022
156
Sinks Grove, WV
So like an idiot I ran across a little power plug thing in my garage that fit the jack on my TS9. I'm not sure where it came from. Anyways, I plugged it in to see if it would power the pedal and POOF! Smoke came out and everything. I'll take the back off of it tonight and see if there's and obvious part that blew.
Has anyone ever done this? Any of you pedal builder know what I might have destroyed?
I can solder guitars no problem so I'm hoping I can scab this pedal back together.
Thanks!
Sounds fatal
 

SAguitar

Senior Stratmaster
Jun 28, 2014
2,186
Oregon
OK, now you guys have done it! I recently rediscovered my trusty old (early '70s) TS9 and started enjoying its specific tone flavors. And then it quit respecting its 9 volt input. I tried a few other wall warts but none of them worked either. I opened it up and investigated replacing the jack. Well, if I had one I could try replacing it, but I don't have one of those in my garage and I'm not sure how to find one. If anyone does know how to source one, please let me know.

But I did find this thread and that gave me a workaround. I ordered one last night from Sweetwater as a belated Fathers Day gift to myself!
 

Matopotato

Strat-Talker
Apr 11, 2021
117
Sweden
OK, now you guys have done it! I recently rediscovered my trusty old (early '70s) TS9 and started enjoying its specific tone flavors. And then it quit respecting its 9 volt input. I tried a few other wall warts but none of them worked either. I opened it up and investigated replacing the jack. Well, if I had one I could try replacing it, but I don't have one of those in my garage and I'm not sure how to find one. If anyone does know how to source one, please let me know.

But I did find this thread and that gave me a workaround. I ordered one last night from Sweetwater as a belated Fathers Day gift to myself!
And it is not "just" a cable to the jack that is off? In my humble experience those components usually endure while cables and solderings are more prone to disrespect the wall warts...
Ymmv
 

dbb541

Senior Stratmaster
Oct 14, 2010
1,429
Eugene
Sorry for moving so slow on this but finally getting started. Was on vacation since Wednesday,
Looks to me like the only burn spots I see are on the plug.
Should I replace it first and then go from there?
Thanks in advance for the help.
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duzie

Most Honored Senior Member
May 1, 2016
5,481
northwest nj
OK, now you guys have done it! I recently rediscovered my trusty old (early '70s) TS9 and started enjoying its specific tone flavors. And then it quit respecting its 9 volt input. I tried a few other wall warts but none of them worked either. I opened it up and investigated replacing the jack. Well, if I had one I could try replacing it, but I don't have one of those in my garage and I'm not sure how to find one. If anyone does know how to source one, please let me know.

But I did find this thread and that gave me a workaround. I ordered one last night from Sweetwater as a belated Fathers Day gift to myself!
An early 70’s TS-9 ?
I thought that series of pedals started in ‘81.
 

Matopotato

Strat-Talker
Apr 11, 2021
117
Sweden
That diode in shot #4 to the left of the plug looks odd to me. I don't have any TS though. The pcb has a drawing for it to go straight "parallel" with the jack/plug. And it looks kind of short imho.
Again I wouldn't know, although many posted that the protective diode could have blown.
 

Eric_G

Senior Stratmaster
Jan 10, 2021
2,814
Quebec
That diode in shot #4 to the left of the plug looks odd to me. I don't have any TS though. The pcb has a drawing for it to go straight "parallel" with the jack/plug. And it looks kind of short imho.
Again I wouldn't know, although many posted that the protective diode could have blown.
You got it. The protection diode is what you saw. It’s actually busted in two… smoke, crackle, pop !
 

dbb541

Senior Stratmaster
Oct 14, 2010
1,429
Eugene

dbb541

Senior Stratmaster
Oct 14, 2010
1,429
Eugene
Your problem is the protection diode.

Right here looks even broken in half…(in red)

View attachment 572575

it should be connected along the blue line I draw.

A 1N5817 diode would do as a replacement. I’ve got loads and will mail you a few if you want.
Thank you for taking the time to edit the picture and offering to mail me one. I looked on ebay and bought 10 of them for $3.45 delivered.
 

Matopotato

Strat-Talker
Apr 11, 2021
117
Sweden
Not sure you should buy, unless you have already but solder wick (narrow copper braid with flux) or solder pump helps getting the old holes cleaned out. I wouldn't invest for a one-time fix perhaps. (Unless you develop a wish to join the diyers) If hard to find or borrow then patience and don't overheat are your best friends in cleaning up. I've ruined a pcb by too much heat for too long and hard pulls (=impatience).
 

Eric_G

Senior Stratmaster
Jan 10, 2021
2,814
Quebec
Thank you for taking the time to edit the picture and offering to mail me one. I looked on ebay and bought 10 of them for $3.45 delivered.
Wow, I pay mine 6 cents each :D

Seriously, I could have mailed you 5, in a standard envelop for free... but now that you ordered...

So, there will be a few steps into swapping this. I think you had mentioned you had soldering experience on guitar wiring, but not PCB experience. That's fine, it's not more complicated, but needs a few different step to be sure you get it right.

1- De-solder the existing one and clean up the through hole connection points. Best way to do this is with de-soldering wick and a solder pump. You should end up with the 2 holes clears of solder and the ability to run the new diode legs right through.

2- Bend the diode at the right width and insert in the through holes. You want it to remain close to the board and will need to turn the board around to perform the soldering. I use blue tack gum, just apply a bit to keep the diode in place. You can also bend the leg lightly on the other side of the board, the V created by the legs will keep it in place.

3- Apply solder, put your iron on the PCB pad and apply the solder. With an iron in the 700F range, that should be made in 3 to 4 seconds max. More heat than that may damage the diode. Once in place cut the remaining of the legs, just up to the solder. Don't cut in the solder, you should have a little pick of the leg coming out of it.

4- Once in place, using a DMM, set to continuity and check you have continuity between the sleeve of the power input to both side of the diode. If all good you also want to check the you have continuity between the diode and the cap on it's left. This will confirm that the PCB was not damaged before or during the replacement. If you don't get connectivity, no biggie, we can slowly troubleshoot from there.

Finally, make sure you have the right power supply :D and test it... if it doesn't work, start tracing voltage, with you black probe on the casing (or any ground point on the board), take voltage measurement on the same testing point as number 4 above. Bothe side of the diode and both side of the cap.
 

dbb541

Senior Stratmaster
Oct 14, 2010
1,429
Eugene
Wow, I pay mine 6 cents each :D

Seriously, I could have mailed you 5, in a standard envelop for free... but now that you ordered...

So, there will be a few steps into swapping this. I think you had mentioned you had soldering experience on guitar wiring, but not PCB experience. That's fine, it's not more complicated, but needs a few different step to be sure you get it right.

1- De-solder the existing one and clean up the through hole connection points. Best way to do this is with de-soldering wick and a solder pump. You should end up with the 2 holes clears of solder and the ability to run the new diode legs right through.

2- Bend the diode at the right width and insert in the through holes. You want it to remain close to the board and will need to turn the board around to perform the soldering. I use blue tack gum, just apply a bit to keep the diode in place. You can also bend the leg lightly on the other side of the board, the V created by the legs will keep it in place.

3- Apply solder, put your iron on the PCB pad and apply the solder. With an iron in the 700F range, that should be made in 3 to 4 seconds max. More heat than that may damage the diode. Once in place cut the remaining of the legs, just up to the solder. Don't cut in the solder, you should have a little pick of the leg coming out of it.

4- Once in place, using a DMM, set to continuity and check you have continuity between the sleeve of the power input to both side of the diode. If all good you also want to check the you have continuity between the diode and the cap on it's left. This will confirm that the PCB was not damaged before or during the replacement. If you don't get connectivity, no biggie, we can slowly troubleshoot from there.

Finally, make sure you have the right power supply :D and test it... if it doesn't work, start tracing voltage, with you black probe on the casing (or any ground point on the board), take voltage measurement on the same testing point as number 4 above. Bothe side of the diode and both side of the cap.
Thank you for this. Extremely helpful.
 
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