I quit because it’s too loud….got me thinking…

bbarott

Most Honored Senior Member
Mar 29, 2010
7,517
Marietta Georgia
The other guitar player in the band I jam with has a Twin Reverb and progressively keeps turning it up to the point where I can’t hear my DRRi on a stand 3 feet away from me. Generally ignores everyone’s pleas to turn down.

You could always get a MusicMan and hand him his lungs ... just sayin ... loudest damn amps on the planet. Generally 500 or so used.
 

dspellman

Senior Stratmaster
Mar 24, 2013
1,217
Los Angeles
I just quit a band because it’s too loud and I hate it. We played a gig the other night where there had been complaints about the noise. We were asked to keep it down. Despite that we were still asked to turn it down twice. It was too loud.
Next day I’m listening to something on ear buds. It’s quite loud. I turn it down. Then it struck me….my preference is to play where it’s quiet but just loud enough. Their preference is to play loud, but just quiet enough.

I’m not into that macho wall of sound where you have to fight to be heard and your ears are ringing the next day.

What are your thoughts?
We just ate dinner at a small barbecue place in Stockton that has a relatively quiet jazz/easy listening band made up of 2 guitars/bass/keyboard/drums with everyone singing. They set up in a corner next to the front window of the establishment. Across the room where the bar/register is located, and up on a high shelf behind the bar is a dB meter with a display that's approximately 1' square. I think they must be limited to around 88 dB by the venue, because the outside of the display lights up at that point as well if they exceed that number.

Ear fatigue during the evening will usually have you pushing up the volume, but if you have some kind of measurement/warning device that keeps you honest, you can avoid that. Crowd noise (assuming anyone comes to hear you play) will also invite you to push up the volume, but again, some kind of accurate measuring gizmo will tell you where you are.
 

Nate D

Most Honored Senior Member
Apr 2, 2016
9,989
Philly, PA
One of the good things about the guys I jam with is paying attention to dynamics and sound instead of just volume.
My first amp was a cheapie solid state peavy (loved it as I was finally able to plug in a wonderful electric guitar- and I still get excited doing just that), but my second was a silver face Champ that I had for years. It was a great amp with great tone. It helped teach me that loud doesn’t equal good. I’ve played plenty loud before, but it’s all about it sounding good. :)
 

soulman969

Most Honored Senior Member
Jan 5, 2016
5,715
Fort Collins, CO
Then it struck me….my preference is to play where it’s quiet but just loud enough. Their preference is to play loud, but just quiet enough.

I’m not into that macho wall of sound where you have to fight to be heard and your ears are ringing the next day.

What are your thoughts?
Same as yours. For starters with the quality and efficiency of modern FOH PA systems there's no need for deafening stage volume period. It also allows over all house volume to be controlled by whose ever running the board.

If a venue is asking you multiple times to turn down and the stage volume is now overcoming the volume of the FOH PA then yeah, you were way too loud for the venue. I'm not interested in being a part of any band whose attitude is this one.

"Their preference is to play loud, but just quiet enough."
 

StratUp

Most Honored Senior Member
Sep 5, 2020
8,964
Altered States
I just quit a band because it’s too loud and I hate it. We played a gig the other night where there had been complaints about the noise. We were asked to keep it down. Despite that we were still asked to turn it down twice. It was too loud.
Next day I’m listening to something on ear buds. It’s quite loud. I turn it down. Then it struck me….my preference is to play where it’s quiet but just loud enough. Their preference is to play loud, but just quiet enough.

I’m not into that macho wall of sound where you have to fight to be heard and your ears are ringing the next day.

What are your thoughts?

My thoughts are that the loud band guys are why I have tinnitus now. I stopped playing with those guys to stop the advance and save the hearing I have left.

So, I'm in favor of the quiet band approach.
 

simoncroft

Still playing. Still learning!
Silver Member
May 30, 2013
19,667
SE England
I have to live with tinnitus every day of my life. So far, it rarely keeps me awake at night, but I know it's getting worse, so it may only be a matter of time. At that point, my life will be Hell.

Playing so loud it damages your hearing, that of your band mates, the audience and the venue staff is selfish and idiotic.

I was that idiot. Now I can't even play a gig. Think about that. Better still, tell every idiot you come across who plays too loud the misery they are storing up for themselves and everyone around them.
 

=KARMA=

Senior Stratmaster
Feb 24, 2015
1,916
Londinium
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J-Mart

Senior Stratmaster
Jul 17, 2020
1,274
Tx
So we had a band meeting discussing this very topic... and I said... "hey, my buddies on this forum.. from all over the world... go through or have went through the same stuff."
 

Namelyguitar

Most Honored Senior Member
Jun 3, 2009
9,126
Mobile Bay, Alabama
The prospect of developing tinnitus should be enough to make everyone think about how loud they play.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noise-induced_hearing_loss

https://www.healthyhearing.com/report/53196-Musicians-tinnitus-and-hearing-loss
I've tried apps on my phone that displayed decibels in a loud room or environment. Simple reference numbers can let one know if they are entering the territory known as hearing loss/ DANGER ZONE, yeah- just like the song! ;)

The point: plenty of musicians (artists?) may not want to play at low volume. I didn't have plugs last night as an audience member. Fortunately, last night's band was not as loud as the British rock group- Slade. That band was l-o-u-d and rocked the entire coliseum when they opened for Aerosmith.
 
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Namelyguitar

Most Honored Senior Member
Jun 3, 2009
9,126
Mobile Bay, Alabama
The prospect of developing tinnitus should be enough to make everyone think about how loud they play.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noise-induced_hearing_loss

https://www.healthyhearing.com/report/53196-Musicians-tinnitus-and-hearing-loss
I've tried apps on my phone that displayed decibels. Simple reference numbers indicate entering territory known as hearing loss/ DANGER ZONE, yeah- just like the song! ;)

The point: plenty of musicians (artists?) may not want to play at low volume aimed at no hearing loss.
 

jjaaam

Strat-Talker
Dec 2, 2021
193
Michigan
Our band is 100% silent stage. Drummer has a nice set of Roland V-drums, keys obviously go direct, I use a POD Go, and the bass player uses an Ampeg amp simulator. We use IEM’s for monitoring.

I absolutely love it. We can be as loud or soft as the venue dictates, and we will always hear ourselves; we can even have our own individual monitor mixes. Mine is mostly my guitar and drums lol.
 

jd35801

Strat-Talker
Jan 17, 2012
368
Alabama
That would be fun but I’m not going to get into a contest over volume. I have always wanted a Super Reverb though and that might allow me to at least hear myself 😊
I used a Super Reverb as my primary amp back in the day. Believe me, you can DEFINITELY hear yourself! You can also get tinnitus and hearing loss, like me. These days it’s a Tweed Deluxe or Deluxe Reverb for gigs. And when listening to live music or playing, I always wear hearing protection.
 

StratUp

Most Honored Senior Member
Sep 5, 2020
8,964
Altered States
I've tried apps on my phone that displayed decibels in a loud room or environment. Simple reference numbers can let one know if they are entering the territory known as hearing loss/ DANGER ZONE, yeah- just like the song! ;)

And just like that song, I now have to ask about my tinnitus "where can I go now that I've gone to far".

The point: plenty of musicians (artists?) may not want to play at low volume. I didn't have plugs last night as an audience member. Fortunately, last night's band was not as loud as the British rock group- Slade. That band was l-o-u-d and rocked the entire coliseum when they opened for Aerosmith.

When I was young, and Aerosmith had just become a national band ( I think the "Dream On" album had just come that year), I saw them in a smallish club. Spent most of the night standing in front of the Marshall stacks.

I don't think that was of help in my tinnitus journey.
 
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