I think it’s TIME the system is revised.

dirocyn

Most Honored Senior Member
Jan 20, 2018
6,408
Murfreesboro, TN
Same here..small town..one industry..80,000 people.
Woah, they make small towns bigger where you come from.

The county I grew up in had a population of 3500 and no industry. We did have ag classes, wood shop and such, but I never took any of them. They weren't graduation requirements and most of them conflicted with Band. I would have taken Auto Shop class if it hadn't conflicted with Band.

But because I grew up rural, by the time I got out of high school I'd done most of the things on the list. I know I suck at riding horses and I've never tried milking a cow. I can milk goats, though. Didn't learn much of that at school.

Imagine if schools these days actually taught all the kids how to do that stuff. Ride horses. The high school nearest me has 3000 students, if "horseback riding" is a 1 period class that's taken for 1 year, that means about 750 students taking the class. If we assume one teacher can handle 30 students and 30 horses at a time (a BIG if, if you ask me) that means 25 classes. There are 7 class periods in the day but there's another limitation--the horses are not going to tolerate 7 different student riders in a day. Maybe 5 (I expect that's pushing it) but still--maybe. So we hire 5 teachers, buy 150 horses, build a barn that can hold 150 horses and their food, hire some people to actually care for the horses...it seems like a lot of expense, and that's before we get into insurance and maintenance. And what you end up with is a class that teaches kids how to ride around in a muddy circle. Which is not exactly something local industry demands.
 
Last edited:

bchaffin72

The Wizard next door................
Oct 4, 2008
13,403
Stratford,Ontario
But because I grew up rural, by the time I got out of high school I'd done most of the things on the list. I know I suck at riding horses and I've never tried milking a cow. I can milk goats, though. Didn't learn much of that at school.

I HAVE milked cows as well as goats. But, alas, must join you in the "suck at riding horses" category.:D
 

Sarnodude

Most Honored Senior Member
Sep 26, 2015
6,377
Mukilteo
Woah, they make small towns bigger where you come from.

The county I grew up in had a population of 3500 and no industry. We did have ag classes, wood shop and such, but I never took any of them. They weren't graduation requirements and most of them conflicted with Band. I would have taken Auto Shop class if it hadn't conflicted with Band.

But because I grew up rural, by the time I got out of high school I'd done most of the things on the list. I know I suck at riding horses and I've never tried milking a cow. I can milk goats, though. Didn't learn much of that at school.

Imagine if schools these days actually taught all the kids how to do that stuff. Ride horses. The high school nearest me has 3000 students, if "horseback riding" is a 1 period class that's taken for 1 year, that means about 750 students taking the class. If we assume one teacher can handle 30 students and 30 horses at a time (a BIG if, if you ask me) that means 25 classes. There are 7 class periods in the day but there's another limitation--the horses are only going to tolerate 7 different student riders in a day. Maybe 5 (I expect that's pushing it) but still--maybe. So we hire 5 teachers, buy 150 horses, build a barn that can hold 150 horses and their food, hire some people to actually care for the horses...it seems like a lot of expense, and that's before we get into insurance and maintenance. And what you end up with is a class that teaches kids how to ride around in a muddy circle. Which is not exactly something local industry demands.
I probably should have said "small city".
 

Old Guy

Strat-Talker
Aug 8, 2018
344
Calif.
Don't ascii me, I don't buy nary a word of it. I thought it was some kind of Hex he was putting on us.


Translation, Man ( what’d he say? )

I am analog and damn proud of it!


@Baelzebub got it.[/QUOTE]
 

Ironwolf

Senior Stratmaster
Gold Supporting Member
Nov 18, 2008
1,119
Boise, Idaho
Just so you know, larger school districts tend to have vocational/tech centers that high schoolers can take classes at in addition to their regular classes at their assigned campus. But that's only fairly recent as it has become more clear that schools have been lacking on real vocational training. And this is also a resource that is harder to come by in some districts because of money and then when you can have it, there are still barriers to some students in the population in terms of accessibility.

My little high school in rural Idaho had Ag and VoTech programs, Electronics, Computer programming (when computers required an entire facility, and programming was in Assembly or Fortran) Home Economics, Music and all the other normal courses. We didn't require billionaire investers. Don't tell me it couldnt be done everywhere if the public had the will to demand it.
 

Johnny Danger

Senior Stratmaster
Aug 28, 2017
1,619
Denton, TX
My little high school in rural Idaho had Ag and VoTech programs, Electronics, Computer programming (when computers required an entire facility, and programming was in Assembly or Fortran) Home Economics, Music and all the other normal courses. We didn't require billionaire investers. Don't tell me it couldnt be done everywhere if the public had the will to demand it.

I addressed it in other posts, but it's worth saying again that rural schools never really forgot how to do vocational training. I'm talking about city folk who were previously laser focused on college prep and then realized they needed to offer extensive vocational training opportunities.
 

Dadocaster

Dr. Stratster
Mar 15, 2015
27,157
Sachse TX behind the cemetary
I addressed it in other posts, but it's worth saying again that rural schools never really forgot how to do vocational training. I'm talking about city folk who were previously laser focused on college prep and then realized they needed to offer extensive vocational training opportunities.

Rural schools never forgot how to do vocational training, but they were mostly terrible with regard to regular education. If your school was rural enough, you might well have learned enough to run your farm/ranch, but if you went to college, you found out first semester, that you had been taught very little about most general education.
 

Johnny Danger

Senior Stratmaster
Aug 28, 2017
1,619
Denton, TX
Rural schools never forgot how to do vocational training, but they were mostly terrible with regard to regular education. If your school was rural enough, you might well have learned enough to run your farm/ranch, but if you went to college, you found out first semester, that you had been taught very little about most general education.

I'm not here to defend rural communities, but I did happen to graduate from a very small school in East Texas in the 90's. For a huge chunk of those people, college prep was a non starter for lots of reasons and the vocational skills they picked up were enough to make sure they were a contributing member of their community that could hold down a job and raise a family. I don't see that as a negative. For the few who were driven and hit the books, there was plenty of opportunity for dual credit courses and other college prep. So I think any school can be effective at both.
 

Dadocaster

Dr. Stratster
Mar 15, 2015
27,157
Sachse TX behind the cemetary
I'm not here to defend rural communities, but I did happen to graduate from a very small school in East Texas in the 90's. For a huge chunk of those people, college prep was a non starter for lots of reasons and the vocational skills they picked up were enough to make sure they were a contributing member of their community that could hold down a job and raise a family. I don't see that as a negative. For the few who were driven and hit the books, there was plenty of opportunity for dual credit courses and other college prep. So I think any school can be effective at both.

How many in your graduating class?
 

Johnny Danger

Senior Stratmaster
Aug 28, 2017
1,619
Denton, TX
How many in your graduating class?

About 80. Having a hard time remembering how many went to college. This was in the era that it was being pushed a lot more, so I expect close to half, but probably not that much. A few went from college into education. The standouts are probably the two top of the class. One went on to a science degree and works in some related chemistry field. The other did law. I went to college, but was not disciplined and wasted a lot of time/money(debt) and later went back to get a STEM degree. But that was on me, not the school. More than one teacher told me to get my ish together, but I was too happy getting by doing basically nothing because I was smart enough to pass with minimal effort.

My previous school experience up to 8th grade was in Garland/Rowlett area.
 

Dadocaster

Dr. Stratster
Mar 15, 2015
27,157
Sachse TX behind the cemetary
About 80. Having a hard time remembering how many went to college. This was in the era that it was being pushed a lot more, so I expect close to half, but probably not that much. A few went from college into education. The standouts are probably the two top of the class. One went on to a science degree and works in some related chemistry field. The other did law. I went to college, but was not disciplined and wasted a lot of time/money(debt) and later went back to get a STEM degree. But that was on me, not the school. More than one teacher told me to get my ish together, but I was too happy getting by doing basically nothing because I was smart enough to pass with minimal effort.

My previous school experience up to 8th grade was in Garland/Rowlett area.

Wow. Obviously, my experience was not universal. ......a lot of the other stuff sounds familiar though.
 


Top