Is a vintage Hardtail a bad investment?

Parksie

Strat-O-Master
Sep 6, 2020
916
Sydney
I'm interested to get thoughts on early 70's hardtails as I'm thinking about getting one.

However I don't want to make the wrong decision.

I'm currently considering a 1973 which is in excellent original condition with a rosewood neck.

I really don't use the tremolo on my current guitar and therefore would like to add a non tremolo strat.

Ive heard the hardtails are light and sound like a strat and a tele combined.

The thing I'm most concerned about is are hardtails super hard to re-sell if I ever need to move it on?

A pic of the guitar is below.

Any advice is appreciated.

Cheers.

PG9A2991-clip-600.jpg
 
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hrstrat57

Strat-Talker
Jun 11, 2016
278
RI
I have a 76 hardtail it’s a lightweight monster. Sounds and plays fantastic- it’s near the top of my lineup. Not all are lightweight tho - many are boat anchors

The guitar pictured looks real nice, like one I’d love to own post more pics.
 

3bolt79

Dr. Stratster
Oct 16, 2018
14,367
Oregon
How much is it? I wouldn’t pay more than 2 K for any three bolt in excellent condition unless it was all original and had the OHSC.

It’s kind of funny but my 79 I bought for 1800, but it was quilted ash and a slab body to boot. It didn’t have the OHSC, which was one of those molded plastic ones that always seem to break down. The case was tossed long ago before I got it. It is my favorite guitar, with very light wear. It also had the original manual and strap, and cord. The manual alone could fetch a hundred bucks at auction.

The dealer that I bought it from tried to get me to sell it back to him. He offered me 2K, which means that he would try to sell it for 3-3.5K. I said no thanks.

While asking prices are sky high right now, I think that bubble will have burst in the next couple of years. I paid more that I probably should have, but it was “The One”. I bought it to play. Look at the pots and everything. The pickups, pots, saddles, pick guard, everything. People either love, or hate 70’s strats.

I had to pass on a 77 the other day. It was ready for a refret and the seller wouldn’t budge on his price. There wasn’t enough fret left to remove the frets. They were almost completely at the level of the board.
 

StratoMutt

Dr. Stratster
Mar 15, 2019
11,382
SE Pennsylvania
I love hardtails. And, despite all you may have heard...guitars are not really great investments.

My 64 was "valued" at $20k US in 2007. In 2008, about a quarter of that.
This. If you want a hardtail at a fair price just get it.

My Warmoth parts Strat aka StratoMutt is a hardtail. Simple, stays in tune very well. I'd not have it any other way.
 

nickmsmith

Dr. Stratster
Jul 28, 2011
14,251
USA
I'm interested to get thoughts on early 70's hardtails as I'm thinking about getting one.

However I don't want to make the wrong decision.

I'm currently considering a 1973 which is in excellent original condition with a rosewood neck.

I really don't use the tremolo on my current guitar and therefore would like to add a non item strat.

Ive heard the hardtails are light and sound like a strat and a tele combined.

The thing I'm most concerned about is are hardtails super hard to re-sell if I ever need to move it on?

A pic of the guitar is below.

Any advice is appreciated.

Cheers.

View attachment 512889
Everything is a gamble. The bigger the cost, the bigger the gamble. I would predict it will increase in value. But I’m no Vegas oddsmaker.

first and foremost I’d plug it in and play. If it plays well, then that’s what ultimately matters.

who knows where the market heads in the future? Kids aren’t playing in garage bands anymore. The amount of people that care about Clapton/Hendrix/SRV are dwindling by the day.

youre probably never going to retire off of the amount of money from the sale, so I’d buy to enjoy it.. or don’t buy, to enjoy something cheaper or better.
 


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