Is your strat the easiest guitar you own for barre chords ?

sourceg101

Strat-Talk Member
Jan 10, 2022
27
SeaTac, WA
It was never a guitar thing, it was a technique thing for me. I learned how to play bar chords the wrong way (self taught) and played like that for years, always wondering why some strings were muted no matter how hard I pushed down. Turns out it took one small technique adjustment and now they're super easy, regardless of neck or string gauge. The dreaded F Minor bar chord is a piece of cake now.
 
Last edited:

relativegain

Strat-Talk Member
Nov 21, 2020
20
California
I find my experiences to be pretty standard. Chording especially of the bar variety are more comfortable on the 7.25. A 7.25-9.5 compound radius is the ****.
 

mohnjossey

Strat-Talker
May 5, 2020
106
Rochester, NY
Interesting topic. I've been thinking about this a lot lately myself. My #1 is my Silver Sky with a 7.25 radius fretboard. That rounded fretboard def makes bar chords easier than my flatter fretboards. Think about how the index finger naturally lays on the fretboard. It makes more sense for it to be curved slightly as opposed to being stiff and straight. That's how my fingers work at least.
 

kdines

Strat-Talker
Dec 12, 2019
117
San Diego
Interesting topic. I've been thinking about this a lot lately myself. My #1 is my Silver Sky with a 7.25 radius fretboard. That rounded fretboard def makes bar chords easier than my flatter fretboards. Think about how the index finger naturally lays on the fretboard. It makes more sense for it to be curved slightly as opposed to being stiff and straight. That's how my fingers work at least.
This is also my experience - maybe it’s my poor technique but I definitely find 7.25 and 9.5s noticeably easier for barre chords. In contrast, it’s more of a conscious effort on 12 inch boards.
 

Mr Jagsquire

Strat-O-Master
Sep 26, 2020
723
Berkshire
I was 17 when I got my JV Squier Strat, which is a 7.25" radius (not that I knew that at the time). I'd been playing about 10 years by that point, so I can't really remember having problems with barre chords when I got the Strat. It was my only guitar as I'd had to trade in a LP style Ibanez to get it, which probably was 12" radius.

I've since read about people saying chords are easier on a 7.25" radius, but to be honest I don't find them any harder on my other Strat with 9.5" radius or on my Gibsons with their 12" radius.

I guess that once you've got barre chords down, then it doesn't really matter. I know some people don't like 7.25" and some will only play 7.25" too. I prefer to mix between them all and different neck profiles too. As I often say on these sorts of threads; being able to play a mix of guitars seems to help my ageing hands.

I also have this idea that one day there will be a shout ' Is there a guitarist in the house?' and I'll be able to play whatever they give me. Though I'll probably not know their set list, so that blows my dream away. :D
 

Miotch

Most Honored Senior Member
Jun 28, 2011
5,361
ok
My Strats are no easier nor harder than any other decent electric guitar (properly set up) that I've owned or played. I vaguely remember struggling to learn barre chords, but that was nearly 45 years ago, so it's no longer easy for me to put in perspective. I'm at the point with new chord fingerings that I'll spend 4-5 minutes with one and then decide if the reward is worth the time and challenge, because one thing you learn over the years is how to cheat a chord or just find an alternate fingering. The other thing is that new fingerings are just sometimes much easier and quicker to get you muscle memory groove on that they would have been when you were a beginner. If I'm still fighting a chord after 10 minutes or so, I'm probably moving on.
 

supersoldier71

Strat-Talker
Nov 29, 2009
105
Fayetteville, NC
I think it’s probably my PRS S2 Standard 24 with Pattern (Regular) neck carve. My Ed O’Brien Strat is close, but longer scale.

The neck carve matters more than anything else, I think.
 


Latest posts

Top