It's good I mostly play originals

Bob M.

Strat-Talk Member
Nov 25, 2009
39
Waltham, MA
I have never learned covers easily and am still not good at it. I practice them but the part where you memorize the complete song such that it can be trotted out in a performnce eludes me. I need to be better at this.

Ideas?
To be a good musician, you have to learn to concentrate and focus intently for about 3 minute intervals (unless you're playing 'American Pie'). Some memorization is involved. Learn to break down the structure of a song rather than just playing a long succession of chords. Understand intros, verses, choruses, pre-choruses, bridges (middle eights if you're British), outros, codas, tags. Once you've learn to break most songs down to these component parts, learning gets alot easier, as you're usually only dealing with 8 bar systems or something similar. For me, I like to write a chart for a new and somewhat difficult song to memorize. The act of writing the chart aids in memorization greatly and I doubt you'll have any trouble remembering the song/arrangement after writing a chart.

Learn very simple 3 chord songs to begin with, then learn 12-bar songs and ice cream changes songs (I-VImi-IV-V). As you increase the song difficulty you'll get better.

Remember you'll get out of it what you put into it. You have to practice and study; there are no shortcuts to being a good musician.
Bob M.
 

Dadocaster

Dr. Stratster
Mar 15, 2015
28,485
Sachse TX behind the cemetary
To be a good musician, you have to learn to concentrate and focus intently for about 3 minute intervals (unless you're playing 'American Pie'). Some memorization is involved. Learn to break down the structure of a song rather than just playing a long succession of chords. Understand intros, verses, choruses, pre-choruses, bridges (middle eights if you're British), outros, codas, tags. Once you've learn to break most songs down to these component parts, learning gets alot easier, as you're usually only dealing with 8 bar systems or something similar. For me, I like to write a chart for a new and somewhat difficult song to memorize. The act of writing the chart aids in memorization greatly and I doubt you'll have any trouble remembering the song/arrangement after writing a chart.

Learn very simple 3 chord songs to begin with, then learn 12-bar songs and ice cream changes songs (I-VImi-IV-V). As you increase the song difficulty you'll get better.

Remember you'll get out of it what you put into it. You have to practice and study; there are no shortcuts to being a good musician.
Bob M.
Thanks Bob.
 

stratblast

Strat-O-Master
Jan 17, 2015
554
OMAHA, NEBRASKA
I have never learned covers easily and am still not good at it. I practice them but the part where you memorize the complete song such that it can be trotted out in a performnce eludes me. I need to be better at this.

Ideas?
Keep practicing. When I first started doing cover songs back in the 70 s I had trouble hearing even 3 chord progressions. Now I am able to pick out minor 7ths diminished chords ….you name it. The more you work with songs the easier putting a song together and retaining it in order to perform it becomes easier the more times you do the process start off with 3 chord songs at first then you can work your way up to the complex songs.
 
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Quikstyl

Strat-Talk Member
Nov 10, 2018
54
California
I have never learned covers easily and am still not good at it. I practice them but the part where you memorize the complete song such that it can be trotted out in a performnce eludes me. I need to be better at this.

Ideas?
Do it old school: sit with the songs lined up and play along. Burned out a lot of cassettes jammin along to learn tunes.
MK
 

stratblast

Strat-O-Master
Jan 17, 2015
554
OMAHA, NEBRASKA
I have never learned covers easily and am still not good at it. I practice them but the part where you memorize the complete song such that it can be trotted out in a performnce eludes me. I need to be better at this.

Ideas?
The internet has made listening to songs and playing them back so much easier over the years. I can set the screen to quarter speed and the notes will be in the same pitch. But paced down on speed by 1/4 if I choose or I can slow it to 1/2 or 3/4. This makes it sooooo easy. Back even in the 90’s if you wanted to do that…. you had to buy a device for over a hundred dollars and put your music cd in it. I almost bought one like my buddy had . Good thing I waited.
 

stratblast

Strat-O-Master
Jan 17, 2015
554
OMAHA, NEBRASKA
Do it old school: sit with the songs lined up and play along. Burned out a lot of cassettes jammin along to learn tunes.
MK
Who needs cassettes or cds or albums when you have internet.? All music is on YouTube for free nowadays. There may be some ads to sit thru now and then. But who cares about that ?
 

stratblast

Strat-O-Master
Jan 17, 2015
554
OMAHA, NEBRASKA
To be a good musician, you have to learn to concentrate and focus intently for about 3 minute intervals (unless you're playing 'American Pie'). Some memorization is involved. Learn to break down the structure of a song rather than just playing a long succession of chords. Understand intros, verses, choruses, pre-choruses, bridges (middle eights if you're British), outros, codas, tags. Once you've learn to break most songs down to these component parts, learning gets alot easier, as you're usually only dealing with 8 bar systems or something similar. For me, I like to write a chart for a new and somewhat difficult song to memorize. The act of writing the chart aids in memorization greatly and I doubt you'll have any trouble remembering the song/arrangement after writing a chart.

Learn very simple 3 chord songs to begin with, then learn 12-bar songs and ice cream changes songs (I-VImi-IV-V). As you increase the song difficulty you'll get better.

Remember you'll get out of it what you put into it. You have to practice and study; there are no shortcuts to being a good musician.
Bob M.
American Pie is one song I have never sat down and tried to learn from start to finish. All my years I have always played bits of it from memory. That is probably why when playing it. I get mixed up on the breaks at times. Same with seasons in the sun.
 

stratblast

Strat-O-Master
Jan 17, 2015
554
OMAHA, NEBRASKA
Regarding writing originals, I have, in the last two years, written around 60+ songs, and to be honest, I would say that, even though I like them, only about twenty or so would be good, though nine of them are really great, in my opinion. I've found that, even in the past, you have to write twenty to get, maybe, six that you aren't afraid to show people! 🎸 (In my opinion..)
I’m sorry. But was this thread about how hard it was to play cover songs or about whether it was better to just do originals as opposed to covers. ? I’m confused
 

stratblast

Strat-O-Master
Jan 17, 2015
554
OMAHA, NEBRASKA
I remembered cover songs by a few things typically 2 versus a chorus then a solo 2 verses a chorus and the ending back when I was doing a lot cover songs this was typically how they all were and you can remember them by highlights parts you like in each song but when it comes down to it...for me if I really liked what I was playing not always the case playing in a band
i would remember every part and the rest ? I've read stories about Brad Gillis being fired from ozzy for not remembering the parts of the songs in order Good luck !
Satisfaction by the Stones does not fit that rule. Neither does a lot of stuff Green Day. Zeppelin. Etc. And even most of the Beatles songs were 2 stanzas a chorus. A Lead. Then third stanza. then chorus repeated and then a repeated stanza to close with. And the rest of their songs fit this pattern perhaps without the lead
 

stratblast

Strat-O-Master
Jan 17, 2015
554
OMAHA, NEBRASKA
I
I find that each song I try to learn has some sort of pattern.
Verse, verse, chorus, verse etc.
once I get that in my head I'm not having to think about chords and fills anymore and concentrate on the words.
If I was playing out I'd certainly consider using an iPad as a prompt for the lyrics.
Then I'd set up a YT playlist and cycle them round and round.
I’ve even learned songs where they cone out of the chorus or bridge then they are playing a half note higher. Some so smoothly one does not even know this unless playing along with the song. That is when it gets tricky.
 

stratblast

Strat-O-Master
Jan 17, 2015
554
OMAHA, NEBRASKA
Yes. I can manage that especially if the drummer is good. I also do ok with playing my originals with the band or solo.

Right now I just need a good hour of covers to do acoustic guy who sings. It would not be life changing but I could make some cash while having fun.
There are a lot of easy 3 chord acoustic songs any where from Neil diamond to Neil young.
 

Dadocaster

Dr. Stratster
Mar 15, 2015
28,485
Sachse TX behind the cemetary
I’m sorry. But was this thread about how hard it was to play cover songs or about whether it was better to just do originals as opposed to covers. ? I’m confused
We are up to nearly 100 posts in this and there have been digressions and my title and first post mention playing originals and working on covers. At this point, I don't think most are going to read the 95 posts. No bid deal to me. I made open ended posts, and so people have talked about all kinds of stuff. meh
 

pazman6

Senior Stratmaster
May 28, 2014
1,963
Prairieville, Louisiana
I always wanted to put one of these teleprompters together. Lots of big acts use/have used them them - Ozzy, Motley Crue, Aerosmith, Bruce Springsteen, Tom Petty, Rush, - cooler than an ipad plus you can make your music notes on the lyrics sheet and have all of it in front of you in a larger font.

31W1rGQWeWL._AC_.jpg
 

Hanson

Senior Stratmaster
Feb 3, 2016
1,824
Mesquite, Texas
I always wanted to put one of these teleprompters together. Lots of big acts use/have used them them - Ozzy, Motley Crue, Aerosmith, Bruce Springsteen, Tom Petty, Rush, - cooler than an ipad plus you can make your music notes on the lyrics sheet and have all of it in front of you in a larger font.

View attachment 582354

Honestly a large monitor on a stand mounted at the foot of the stage does the same thing. From the audiences view they look pretty much like a floor monitor which is normal to see on stage.
 


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